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September 22, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-22

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

STARTS TONIGHT!
"UNFORGETTABLE! IT IS SO BEAUTIFUL
THAT IT REQUIRES MORE THAN ONE VISIT!"
-The New Yorker.
"A STUNNING, RICHLY ROMANTIC EVOCATION
OF TIME AND PLACE! Visconti's Venice is a cine-
matic dream. Bogarde gives a superior perform-
ance!" -Playboy
"MIGHT WELL BE VISCONTI'S MASTERPIECE!
Fascinating, enigmatic, overwhelmingly seductive in
its inner logic. Its physical grace and beauty are
breathtaking !" -Show

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, September 22, 1972

"EXTRAORDINARILY BEAUTIFUL!"

-Rex Reed

"VISCONTI IS A GENIUS!"

-Gannett News Syndicate

"REMARKABLE! A STUNING VISUAL RECREA-
TION!" -New York
"A MASTERPIECE OF POWER AND BEAUTY!"
-Cue Magazine
THE CELEBRATED STORY OF A MAN OBSESSED
BY IDEAL BEAUTY.

Inews briefs
By The Associated Press
PRESIDENT NIXON wound up his survey of post-freeze pro-
posals yesterday, and will reportedly be ready to unveil his "phase
II" program for the economy in mid-October.
The timing of the announcement is planned to "give everyone
30 days to prepare themselves" for what will follow the freeze, accord-
ing to Senate Minority Leader Hugh Scott (R-Penn.).
Meanwhile, the House Ways and Means committee approved
the controversial business tax credits portion of Nixon's economic
plan making only minor alterations in the original p1'oposal.
* * *
TERRORISTS touched off a bomb yesterday at the home of
a labor leader once mentioned as a possible running mate for
President Nguyen Van Thieu.
The target of the attack, Tran Quoc Buu president of South
Vietnam's million-member Confederation of Labor escaped unhurt
from the blast which destroyed his living room.
The incident came at the end of a politically turbulent day as
student demonstrations and opposition blasts against the one-man
candidacy of Thieu continued.
*
BUSSING from minority dominated schools to integrated
schools improves the education of black and Mexican-American
elementary students a recent report states.
The report, based on a survey taken in Sacremento, Calif. shows
that in tests of arithmetic and reading ability minority students
studying in integrated situations consistently outscored their coun-
terparts in minority dominated schools.
Dr. Donald Hall of the Sacramento Board of Education said
there was no noticeable drop or gain in scores by whites after minor-
ity students were bused into their schools.
* A*
FRENCH NATIONAL RADIO speculated last night that Mao-
Tse-Tung was either dead or seriously ailing.
The Chinese Embassy in Ottawa Canada said yesterday it had no
information concerning the health of Mao, and monitors in Tokyo re-
ported nothing new about him in broadcasts from Peking.
French press speculation is apparently based on a series of
puzzling incidents including refusal of Chinese off icialp to talk to
newsmen, and reports that the celebration of China's National Day,
Oct. 1, had been called off.
BUSING OPPONENTS in Pontiac said yesterday they will
seek passage of a constitutional amendment permitting parents
to determine where their children will attend school.
Sponsors of the amendment say they will attempt to collect 250,000

China debate
nears as U.N.!
session opens
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (R) - The United States expressed
"overflowing" confidence of success in seating "both Chinas"
as the United Nations General Assembly opened its 26th
session yesterday.
The United States said it had rounded up a dozen spon-
sors for two resolutions aimed at seating the People's Republic
of China in the General Assembly and on the Security Coun-
cil and retaining Nationalist China's place in the assembly.
Delegation spokesmen said the proposals would be put forth
this week.
Eighteen backers of the People's ~~
Republic of China, however, have
submitted a resolution that would T ends
seat Peking and oust Chiang Kai-P r t s en
Shek's Taiwan regime.
Informed diplomats expect the
pro-Peking delegations to fight L a. prison
the U.S. proposals in the steering
committee today or tomorrow, NEW ORLEANS, La. ()-Fifty-
with claims that the U.S. plan is four prisoners who had barricaded
both a duplication of their own themselves in the Orleans Parish
and a dodge to bar Peking, which Prison during a five-hour dis-
has said it will not come to the turbance Monday night surrend-
United Nations as long as Na- ered without resistance after noon
tionalist China is a member. yesterday, officials said.
The committee's agenda recom- The 54 were the last of a group
mendations will be subject to ap-
proval of the full assembly, which of more than 250 inmates who
caused severe damage to the three-

U. N. SECRETARY GENERAL U THANT (left) greets U.S. Am-
bassador to the United Nations George Bush prior to the opening
of the 26th General Assembly of the United Nations in New York
yesterday.
NEW RULING:
State- game statutes to*be
enforced against Indians

WARNER BROS PRESENTS AILM LBY J
WINNER GRAND PRIX CANNES 25th ANNIVERSARY AWARD
p LUO40 \!SGAru
WARNER BROS, PRESEN7,E A FILM BY LUCH'INO VISCON T
STARRING DIRK BOGARDE N "DEATH IN VENICE" / BU' / NDRESEN
sUESLVANA MANG('AN / C^ /SCREENPLAYBYCOA
USTN /UAM G TECNAV0SON* SCPP┬žAtBYVISCONTI BADALUCCO
FRO THE NOVELtBY THE)MAS EfAN/ PRODUCED' & ( TI ASOCATEEXECUTNE
SCTBY LUCHI IN XJUVISCO N / CE ROBE GORDON 'OM
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER - MARIO GALO ! FROM WAER OYBEOS .A KINNEY LESURE SERVI~C[tp Q

LANSING U) - The Michigan
Natural Resources Department
said yesterdayrthat starting next
Monday it will resume applying all
state fish and game laws to In-
dian fishermen, hunters and trap-'
pers.
The Department said it will "ri-
gidly enforce" the laws and "re-
quire full compliance" by all In-
dians throughout. the state except
the L'Anse and Vieux DeSert
bands of the Chippewa tribe along
the Keweenaw Bay area covered
in a recent state high court opin-
ion.

fishing rights under five disputed
treaties were rescinded when
Michivan became a state and
gained title to lands held by the
federal government.
The department said "com-
passionate" commercial licenses'
will be available to Indians in1
areas where additional netting
"will not place undue pressure on,
Great Lakes fish stocks."
It said it also will back legis-
lation allowing Indians free sport
fishing and hunting licenses.
A court battle by Indian fisher-
men contesting the department's
decision is expected.

meets rFriday.
Debate and voting on th China
resolutions is expected on the
10-day period beginning Oct. 18.
Indonesian Foreign Minister
Adam Malik, newly elected presi-
dent of the assembly, focused on
the China question in his address,
urging the organization to forge
"a universality of membership" for
the United Nations.
Leading issues besides China
among the 109 items on the pro-
posed agenda for the session are
how to make peace in the Middle
East and who should be U.N. sec-
retary-general after U Thant leav-
es at the end of this year.

story structure during the Inci-
dent.
Officials had reported early in
the day that the disturbance was
"all over," but Warden A. J. Fal-
kenstein acknowledged at mid-
mornihg that the 54 were locked
in the cell blocks of one tier and
had refused breakfast.
Criminal Sheriff Louis A. Heyd
Jr. said the last 54 surrendered
shortly after noon. He said they
were being searched for possible
concealed weapons.

O PiH DPorUM
SIFTH AVENUE AT LIBERTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 761-9700

SHOWN
6:45 & 9 P.M.

Subscribe to The Daily
Phone 764-0558
SHOP WEDNESDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M.

signatures statewide to get the issue on the November 1972 state The court's ruling earlier this
ballot. spring held that Indians under
Pontiac's busing program ,ordered by U.S. District Court Judge several centuries old federal trea-
Damon Keith has been upheld by the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Ap- ties are exempt from conservation
peals and is presently on appeal by the Ponitiac School Board before laws because they were granted
the .S.Supeme our. :unrestricted fishing and hunting
the U.S. Supreme Court rights in exchange for deeding
lands to the federal government.
A FEDERAL JUDGE yesterday ordered the massive Tennes- The ruling raised a storm of
see-Tombigbee water way project in Mississippi halted until he controversy among white-orient-
can determine its effect on the environment. ed sportsmen's groups and the,
The decision, the third such victory for the Environmental De- court later issued a clarifying,
fense Fund, was termed "judicial tyranny" yesterday by Mississippi statement that not all Indians were
Senator James Eastland, a Democrat, covered by the ruling as'had been
The proposed project would create a 300-foot-wide waterway widely supposed.
in the northeastern part of the state. Department re-examination of
old Indian treaties, one source
.I .CUPON) . said, made it "patently clear that
( )it was the intent of the drafters
: M rM n i's that the rights were temporary
s and precarious and subject to re-
FRESubmarine ' vision."
The department position, work-
FREE SOFT DRINK with ed out in coordination with Atty.1
each Mr. Mini's purchase * Gen. Frank Kelley and Gov. Mil-
r liken's office, is that apart from
.* Offer good thru 10-1-71 at I tetet oee nteArl
S. University location only u the treaty covered in the April
jin~mm~~Supreme Court case, hunting and

GOVT. DECL ASSFIES
Pentagon Papers released

I
i

WASHINGTON ( P) - The Pen-
tagon Papers which caused such
a hullaballoo when they first ap-
peared in the press were sent to
the printers yesterday enroute to
general sale.
The officially declassified docu-
ments dealing with U.S. involve-
ment in Vietnam were sent to Con-
gress yesterday and rushed to the
government printers. at once. Four
volumes reportedly dealing with
peace negotiations and prisoner-
release nnegotiations were not re-
leased for publication.
Public printer A.N. Spencer said
they'll be ready ror public sale
within a week-but he foresees no
heavy demand for them at $6 a
set.

THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

-. 5
7 .

House Armed Services Commit-
tee Chairman F. Edward Hebert,
(D-La.) said only 20 of 435 House
members have looked at t'e "top
secret" copies of the 47-volume
Vietnam study that have been
available to them in his commit-
tee room for three months.
Rady Johnson, Secretary of De-
fense Melvin Laird's legislative-
affairs assistant, notified four con-
gressional committees that four of
the original 47 volumes had been
eliminated entirely.
"They deal exclusively with sen-
sitive negotiations seeking peace
and. the release of prisoners of
war," Rady said in a cover let-
ter.
"Their disclosure would adver-
sely affect continuing efforts to
achieve those objectives."
Pentagon spokesman Jerry
Friedheim however said yesterday
that among documents which will
remain classified is a special Pen-

tagon study of the Tonkin Gclf in-
cident. The incident inspired the
Tonkin Gulf resolution mandating
to President Lyndon Johnson the
power to prosecute the war in In-
dochina.
Disclosures of the Tonkin Gulf
study appeared along with ac-
counts of other Pentagon docu-
ments in newspaper accounts this
summer.
Friedheim said an early Penta-
gon study of the Tonkin Gulf in-
cidentthat was sent to Congress
along with the Pentagon papers in
June has not been declassified and
is not among the papers released
for the public.
The Pentagon said about 5 per
cent of the material in the remain-
ing 43 volumes had been censored
out by some 100 Defense and State
Department personnel since June
22 when Laird announced a de-
classified version would be releas-
ed in 90 days.

Af

Miss J and her

"A UNIQUE
AND OFTEN STUNNING
SPECTACLE! DEMONIAC MAS-
QUES AND BLASPHEMOUS ORGIES...
AS A GLIMPSE OF HELL, IT IS SUPERB-
LY FRIGHTENINGLY EFFECTIVE."- TIME MAGAZINE
"KEN RUSSELL'S TURBULENT MOVIE ON-=
SLAUGHT...HE HAS BREWED HIS OWN
'RUSSELL'S INFERNO' BRILLIANCE
IS THERE WITH HARROWING
FFECT. - CUE MAGAZINE

special little dress
by The Cottager will
be seen in all the best
places. It's that kind
of dress in soft nylon
jersey gathered slightly
and sashed in back.
5-13P sizes.
Wine or black. $22.

MICK JAGGER. And MICK JAGGER.
Vice. And Versa.
PERFORMANCE
JAMES FOX, as runaway gangster, meets recluse rock-star and
ritual. Brilliant color photography.
"Then came PERFORMANCE; that confused, remarkable, psy-
chedelic radicalizer. One can interpret the, film as a vicious as-
sault on capitalism . . . as well as a sermon on the potentialities
of the drug culture for defusing its terror." Richard Neville, p. 30
CREEM magazine, October, 1971.
THURSDAY-September 23-ONLY
auditorium a 35 mm. 7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
angell hall Rated "X" Still Only 75c
the ann arbor film cooperative
TUESDAY-John Huston's MOBY DICK with Gregory Peck

. ..

0W6J~j

VANESSA REDGRAVENOLIVER REED
IN KEN RUSSELL'S FILM OF

'"

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