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September 19, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday,. September 19, 1971

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, September 19, 1971

AT T ICA PANEL:
Lack offu nds
factor ini riots?'
ATTICA, N.Y. (N-The chairman of a congressional panel
investigating the riot at Attica Correctional Facility said
yesterday that "had there been enough money, much of this
tragedy could have been prevented."
Rep. Claude Pepper (D-Fla.) and members of his House
Select Committee on Crime, spent seven hours at the prison.
Pepper said afterward that because of ina equate financing
of penal institutions "all of us are responseble for what hap-
pened here."
Pepper said Gov. Nelson Rockefeller had told him earlier
that it would take between $100 million and $200 million to
bring correctional facilities up
" to an adequate level in New
Attica sto - York State.
Another panel member charged
Looking h ck there had been "indiscriminate
shooting" when a heavily armed

Study indicates GS degree
as harmless to grads' future

(Continued from Page 1)
knowledge of his subject and
interest in college," wrote one
BGS graduate.
Of those who sought jobs after
graduation only one felt that BGS
had in any way hurt his chances
of obtaining a job, while 35 per
cent felt it helped them gain em-
ployment and 60 per cent felt it
had no effect at all.
Those seeking employment typi-
cally felt that their grade-point
averages as well as having gradu-
ated from the University of Mich-
igan were the most important fac-
tors in gaining employment.
The BGS grads who answered
the questionnaire responded over-
whelmingly (91 per cent) that the
BGS program had benefitted their
education and nine per cent said
it had no effect at all.
"The freedom of the program

allowed me to enjoy school for the1
first time," reads one typical .com-
ment. Many felt that the freedom
of the BGS helped them tap new
areas of interest and mature in
making their own decisions.
"It gave me a control over my
education that made enough of a
difference to keep me engaged
with exploring my own interests
instead of just getting by or drop-
ping out," commented one BGS1
graduate.
"It freed me from the require-
ments of any one department. Pri-
mary in importance is that in
BGS a student escapes becoming
trapped in the structure and at-
titudes of one department," said
another.
Quite a few of those responding
were relieved that they no longer
had to deal with counselors.
The shortcoming of the program

BGS grads were most concerned
with was the restriction on the
number of hours a student may
take in one department.
The degree requires that a stu-
dent take 60 hours of 300-level and
above courses. No more than 20
of those hours in one department
can be credited toward the degree.
As well, there is a 40-hour maxi-
mum limit on all courses taken
within any one department.
Others felt the degree suffered
only from an undeserving reputa-
tion.
"The only shortcoming it had
was that when it was instigated it
was played up as a cheap BA and
as an escape from languages in-
stead of a new degree from one
of the most prestigious universities
in the world," remarked one.
One of1 the chief purposes of the
survey, according to Revitte, was
to answer many students' express-
ed fears about their future after
going through the BGS program.
"Not only do the results show
that the BGS did not hinder their
futures," Revitte says, "but almost
every student responded that the
BGS had in some way improved
his education at the University oT
Michigan."

Boy's school-fantasy?
LINDSAY ANDERSON'S
if....
Tues., Sept. 21-
7 & 9:30 p.m.
auditorium a-angell hall
ann arbor film cooperative
For the student body:
LEVI'S
CORDUROY
Slim Fits ... $6.98
(All Colors)
Bells ...... $8.50
DENIM
Bush Jeans . $10.00
Bells8.......$8.00
Boot Jeans . $7.50
Pre-Shrunk . $7.50
Super Slims $7.00
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

.~J..
AUDITION!
University of Michigan Arts Chorale
(Concert Choir)
OPEN TO NON-MUSIC- MAJORS ONLY
Rehearsals TUESDAYS and THURSDAYS, 3-4:30
Auditorium C-ANGELL HALL
This choir has been recognized as one of the outstanding choral
ensembles in Michigan, performing major choral works with or- {
chestra as well as music in a lighter vein. Qualified singers urged
to participate. Auditions during rehearsal schedule. For informa-
tion, call 764-2506.
The choir is under the direction of Prof. Maynard Klein, conduc-
tor of University Choirs.
1 Hour Academic Credit
orority RUSh
.....

4

A

(Continued from Page 3)
nine guard-hostages had died of
gunshot wounds.
Commissioner Oswald defend-
ed his decision to storm the re-
bel cell block D. He was backed
up by Rockefeller.
There were still many unans-
wered questions.
What were the orders of the
battle for the more than 1,000-
strong state trooper and guard
force that stormed the rebel bar-
ricades in cell block D on Mon-
day?
What accounted for the stream
of erroneous information of the
deaths of the hostages?
DAILY OFFICI
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
Astronomy Dept.: Open house at
Radio-Astronomy Observatory at Peach
Mt, 10280 Nf Territorial Rd, 2-4:30 pm.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20
Computing Center: Film, "Use of the
Teletype in MTS," Aud. D. Angell Hall,
8, 9 pm.
Engineering Mechanics S e m i n a r:!
Stanley Jacobs, "On Wind-Driven Lake
Circulations," 325 W. Engin, 4 pm.
Annual Competition for Overseas
Study to Close Soon: Fulbright -Hays
scholarships forgraduate students; ap-
plications and all information may be
obtained from campus Fulbright Prog.
Adviser, Dean G. E. Hay, 1010 Rack-
ham; deadline for filing applics. on
this campus is Oct, 11, 1971.
Engineering Placement Service
128-H, W. Eng. Bldg.
Placement Mtg. No. 3: "Employment
Interviewing and Plant Visits," Prof.
J.G. Young, 311 W. Engin. Sept. 20, 4
& 7:30 pm.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB
September 17
The Advance Systems Corp., Ohio.
Will interview Sept. 23, 1:30-5 pm.
Student reps needed. No investment
on your part. Full or part-time work.
Good money. Further details avail.
Register n person or by phone, 764-
7460..

force of state troopers and backup
personnel retook the prison Mon-
day. The prisoner rebellion and
the storming of the maximum se-
curity facility left 30 inmates and
10 prison employes dead.
Committee m e m b e r Charles
Rangel, a Democrat from Harlem
in New York City, said, "I believe
there was indiscriminate shooting
. .. that much of the gunfire was
unnecessary."
Rangel said what happened at
Attica when the prison uprising
was quelled was a "proper subject
for a grand jury."
-AL BULLETIN
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3rd floor, S.A.B.
On-campus interviews - begin Sept.
27. Appts. for first week may be made
beginning tomorrow, Stop by office for
bulletin about the recruiters that will
be on campus. All people graduating
'this year eligible to intervew at Career
Planning & Placement.
Recruiters coming the week of Sept.
27 include:
Univ. of Santa Clara Law School
Michigan Dept. of State Police
Henry Ford Hospital
New York Life Insurance Co.
Defense Supply Agency'
ATTENTION: Srs and grad students
receiving degree in 71-72: GRAD II,
free computerized system for matching
grads with potential employers avail.
Come in and pick up forms; deadline
for completed forms, Oct. 11. (Engr. &
Grad. Bkus. Ad. students, consult your
respective placement offices.)
Baha'i Group Informational meeting,
Sept. 21, 8:00 PM, Piano Lounge, AliceE
Lloyd Hall. Speaker: Joy Earle "History
and the Baha'i Faith." <
Graduate Outing Club, Hiking, rain
or shine, Sept. 19, 1:30 PM. Huron St.
entrance to Rackham Bldg.
Small Photo Club meeting, Sept. 19,
7:00 PM, 3524 SAB.
Ann Arbor Tenants Union Counselor
meeting, Sept. 20, 1:00 PM, 1528 SAB.
Students for McGovern, Mass Meet-
ing, Sept. 23, 7:00 PM, Union basement
Assembly Hail.

Missile fire threatens
to break Mideast truce

(Continued from Page 1)
continue to observe the truce
"meticulously."
They scoffed at Egypt's state-
ment that the transport was hit
in revenge for the shooting down
of an Egyptian fighter-bomber a
week ago by Israeli machinegun-
ners, the first plane claimed shot
down since the cease-fire began
on Aug. 7, 1970.
The officials said the Egyptian
Sukhoi SU7 had violated the cease-
fire by flying into Israeli airspace,
while insisting that the Strato-
Vietnam vets
(Continued from Page 1)
your system," he adds.
The group plans to ally itself
with other Vietnam veterans in
the Ann Arbor area instead of
forming formal ties with other
broad - based political coalitions
"that destroy our credability as
veterans," Lewis says.
"This is not just another mid-
dleclass end-the-war teaparty,"
Reade asserted.

cruiser never ventured over Egyp-
tian territory.
In Cairo,an Egyptian spokes-
man played down Israeli reports
of unusual preparedness measures
by. Israeli and Egyptian troops lin-
ing the Suez cease-fire line.
"Our troops have always been
on the alert," he said, "nothing
unusual about that."
The hostilities along the canal
coincided with a fresh outbreak of
ground fighting in Lebanon near
its border with Israel. The Leba-
nese military command said a
farmer and his wife in the village
of Rmaich were killed by Israeli
forces.
The military command in Tel
Aviv said the fighting was trig-
gered by Palestinian guerrillas
who slipped into Israel. The com-
mand said its soldiers killed two
guerrillas but a spokesman said
he had no knowledge of the Rmaich
shootings reported by Lebanon.
He said 'the guerrillas' bodies
were deposited at the border after
the fighting stopped. The Lebanese
area near the fighting is known as
a guerrilla stronghold.

1

icrt

V

Hey, Man,
Get It ALL
Together at
U Towers
2, 3, & 4-man apts.
--still available
8 month lease
- Great location
Swimming Pool
Air conditioned apts.
Single Liability
New Apartment Furnishings

II

I

RADICAL LAWYER
MihalTiga~r
(counsel to Angela Davis
and Seattle 8 Conspiracy)
The Government Use
of the Grand Jury to
Repress the Left,
MON., SEPT. 20--7:15 P.M.
LAWYERS CLUB LOUNGE
NO ADMISSION CHARGE

- .d

,Mr

IE -

Student
Wives

I

Graduate
Undergradl

uate

536 S. Forest

761-2680

I

i .3

L

join

MICHIGAN

DAME

s

T

HE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
KING KONG
TOMORROW-MON., SEPT. 20
SHOWS AT 7 AND 9:30
330 Maynard
Across from Nickels Arcade
$1.00
COMING TUES.--Bergman's Through A Glass Darkly
sponsored by ann arbor film cooperative

X

The National Association of University
Dames-Michigan Chapter-Ann Arbor
GENERAL MEETING

Tuesday, September 21, 1971, 8 p.m.
Huron High School Dining Room

Jl

LI

1

7

SHOP JACOBSON'S MONDAY-TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY
AND SATURDAY-9:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M.
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY-9:30 TO 9:00 P.M.
a pretty fancy idea for Miss J..e.
our dress with shortcut pant by
Judy Gibbs plays the party role
beautifully. The delicate white
top is puckered stretch nylon over
.black acetate crepe arranged for
a pretty show of leg.
Sizes 5 to 13. $44.
Mesh-front stretch boot of
white crinkle patent vinyl. $18.
U .U .

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