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September 19, 1971 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-19

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 19, 1971

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, September 21, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center
Subject:
"PING-PONG DIPLOMACY:

IRISH DRUB CATS

Top-rankied

BCOMING NIXON VISIT TO CHyINA"" The Associated Press seven interceptions, several Wild-
THEC NXLINCOLN, Neb. - Nebraska's cat fumbles and a blocked puntc
Speaker: Prof. Rhoads Murphey, Director, nationally top-ranked Cornhuskers into a 50-7 spanking of Big Ten
Center for Chinese Studies methodically posted a pair of first power Northwestern yesterday.
For Reservations, call 662-5529 Sponsored by the Ecumenical q u a r t e r touchdowns yesterday, On offense the Irish, alternating
Cost: 50c Campus Center gave Minnesota a play in the sec- junior Pat Stenberge and senior
ond quarter, then rallied for a Bill Etter at quarterback during1
35-7 football triumph before 69,187 most of the game, relentlessly
persons, largest crowd in Me- ground the Wildcats town with1
morial Stadium history. superior size and depth.
Quarterback Jerry Tagge hit Three interceptions and a pair
fleet flanker Johnny Rodgers on! of lost fumbles in the first half1
touchdown passes of 28, 20 and a dug the Wildcats, 0-2, a hole tooI
37 yards asd Jeff Kinney con- deep to climb out of.
y uu s :tributed two touchdowns on short The Irish, with Stenberge start-
A r a m a y S rp u plunges as Nebraska ran its un- in tqatrak a aGh
beaten string to 21 games. time getting untracked. But All-
Used Blue Jeans- $2.99 The win maintained for Coach America candidate Walt Patulski,
Bob Devaney a 'record of never a 6-foot-5, 235-pound defensive end
Wallace Beery Shirts-$3.00 losing to a Big Ten Conference stormed in to block a Wildcat punt
team in 10 Nebraska seasons, and at the Northwestern 32-yard line
British Fire-service Jackets- $11.00 gave the Huskers their seventh with 9:23 left in the first quarter.
Pea-coats from $239 9straight win over the Golden *
$23.9Gophers since 1960.
Well contained offensively dur- Washington squeaks
514 E. W ILLIAM ing the first period, Minnesota SEATTLE - Sonny Sixkiller hit
(abo e CmpusBike took command for a time in the Tom Scott with a 33-yard pass with
(above Carpus Bike) second quarter. Quarterback Craig two andta alf inuteet
Curry and fullback Ernie Cook toadahl iue etys
HOURS: 10:30-5:30 p.m. PHONE: 761-6207 / te d to move Minnesota 79 terday to give Washington a 38-35
y armsdntadrve MinesbyaJ7m intersectional football victory over
yards in a drive capped by Jim Purdue.
-- - -----Henry's six-yard touchdown run,
cutting Nebraska's margin to 14-7. Sixkiller's pass came just a
g s * n tminute after Purdue quarterback
Gary Danielson connected with
A-7030 STEREO TAPE DECK: An all-sold-state, single- Irish crush 'Cats Darryl Stingley on an 80-yard pass
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Gornhu
his third of the day-the first also
coming on a Sixkiller pass. His
second was on a 60-yard run.
* * *
Badgers tie
SYRACUSE, N.Y. - Wisconsin
linebacker Ed Albright blocked an
extra point kick by Syracuse's
Erle Baugher yesterday and pre-
served a 20-20 football tie for the
underdog Badgers.
Wingback Brian Hambleton had
tied the score for the Orangemen
in their season-opener by taking a
12-yard touchdown pass from Bob
Woodruff with 45 seconds remain-
ing in the game.
That score came less than two
minutes after Wisconsin's tight
end, Larry Mialik, scored on a 21-
yard pass from Neil Graff, carry-'

skers

bury

ing a defender on his back the last
five yards. An attempted two-I
point pass conversion to Alan
Thompson failed.
* *
Spartans silenced
ATLANTA-- Brent Cunningham,'
Georgia Tech's 170-pound speed-I
ster, dashed 28 yards for a fourth-
period touchdown yesterday as the
Yellow Jackets whipped 18th-
ranked Michigan State 10-0, spoil-
ing Coach Duffy Daugherty's bii
for his 100th victory at State.
' Cunningham's touchdown run
came with 10:32 remaining in the
game, three plays after Jeff Ford
intercepted a Michigan State pass
and returned it 12 yards to the
Spartan 36.
The Jackets had nursed a 3-0

lead through two quarters as Cam
Bonifay booted a 32-yard field goal 1
with 13:15 left in the first half. I
Fullback Rob Healy set it up with i
a 42-yard sprint to the Spartan 18. 1
Hoosiers victorious
BLOOMINGTON-Chris Gartner,
son of a Swedish bishop, kicked
four field goals yesterday for In-l
diana's football team and the
Hoosiers caged Kentucky's Wild-
cats 26-8.
The junior's soccer-style kicks
were good for a 32-yarder in the
first quarter, a 47-yard goal in the
secondquarter and two ofd37 and
39 yards in the final period.
* * *
Hawkeyes halted
CORVALIS, Ore.-Oregon State,

stung by its own mistakes, charged
back from a 7-0 deficit to defeat
the Iowa Hawkeyes 33-19 in college
football action yesterday.
Despite three pass interceptions
and four lost fumbles, Oregon State
earned a 10-7 halftime lead, then
added the clincher late in the third
period when fullback Mike Daven-
port took a pitchout in from 10
yards out.
Illini shut out .
CHAMPAIGN-Flashing tailback
Ike Oglesby piled up 175 rushing
yardsaand scored on a58-yard pass
play and a 3-yard plunge to lead
alert North Carolina to an 27-0
football victory over slightly fa-
vored Illinois yesterday.
Oglesby almost single-handedly
spoiled the home coaching debut
of Bob Blackman, former Dart-
mouth coach, whose Illini handed
North Carolina a gift first touch-

Goph ers

GIANTS, DODGERS LOSE:
Lolich, Tigers humble Orioles

down.

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A-70100 STEREO TAPE DECK: This deck offers you the same
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THOMAS A. MOOREHEAD, Director
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CONTACT
THE PROJECT COMMUNITY
Thomas A. Moorehead, Director
2210 Student Activities B1'dg.
Phone 763-3548
PROGRAMS '71-'72

11
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By The Associated Press
DETROIT-Mickey Lolich drove
in both runs and won his 25th
game of the season yesterday as
Detroit trimmed Baltimore 2-1
and sliced the Orioles' American
League East lead to five games.
The second place Tigers, who've
beaten Baltimore three times in
the last two days, have just nine
games left to play and the Orioles'
magic number for clinching their
third straight division title remains
at eight.
Lolich hurled his 26th complete
game in his 42nd start and in-
creased his innings pitched total
to 351. His record is 25-1l.
The Tigers tallied twice off
Oriole starter. Jim Palmer with
two out in the fourth. Bill Freehan_
bounced a single to left, but was
forced by Jim Northrup. Then
Mickey Stanley scratched a double
We Style Hair.
We Don't Just Cut It.
OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Arborland-E. Liberty
Maple Village
East U. at So. U.

off shortstop Jerry Davanon's
glove, the ball skipping into short
left field. Ed Brinkman was given
an intentional pass to load the
bases.
Then Lolich hit a high-bounder
past second base. Dave Johnson
fielded the ball but his throw to
first was late and both runners
crossed the plate on the infield hit.
* * *
Dodgers cheated
LOS ANGELES - The Atlanta
Braves wiped out an early 5-2
deficit and went ahead for good
with a two-run sixth inning to de-
feat the Los Angeles Dolgers 9-6
yesterday and further tighten the
National League West Division
-race.
Atlanta's victory moved the
third - place Braves within 5 1'
games of the front-running San
Francisco Giants. The Dodgers re-
mained two games behind the
Giants in second place.
A two-run homer by Willie Davis
in the first inning and a three-run
second had propelled the Dodgers
into an early 5-2 advantage before
the Braves made their comeback.
They scored a run in the fourth
on the first of Darrell Evans' two
home runs and tied the game at
5-5 with a two-run fifth keyed by
Earl Williams' RBI double and a
run-scoring ground out by Evans.
The Braves then snapped the tie
on Felix Millan's run-scoring,
bloop double down the right field
line and scored the eventual win-

ning run on Mike Lum's sacrifice
fly. It was the second game in a
row that Lum delivered the win-
ning run against the Dodgers.
Evans hit his second homer of
the day in the top of the seventh
off Pete Mikkelsen, the ninth
homer surrendered by Dodger
pitching in the last three games.
Richie Allen socked a home run
in the last of the seventh for the
reeling Dodgers, who lost their
fourth straight.
Williams also hit a-homer for
Atlanta, his 33rd, in a two-run
scored.
* * *
Padres triumph
SAN FRANCISCO-San Diego's
Clay Kirby pitched perfect base-
ball through seven innings and beat
the first place San Francisco
Giants 2-1 on a one-hitter yester-
day.
Kirby, a '23-year-old right-hand-
er, gave up a leadoff home run to
Willie McCovey in the eighth in-
ning after retiring the first 21
Giant batters. He struck out 10 and
walked one in making his record
14-13.
Gaylord Perry, 14-12, took the
loss despite a fine pitching per-
formance for the Giants, who have
lost 12 of their last 14 games.
Perry allowed just five hits and
one earned run.
The Padres scored in the third
inning on a triple by former Giant
Bob Barton and a squeeze, bunt
by Enzo Hernandez.

Ann Arbor Innovative
Education Project
Ann Arbor Day Care
Project
Black Liberation School
Matrix (Resource
Center)
Mental Health Halfway
House

Project Community
Courses
Solstis Free School
Washtenaw Community
College Project
Willis Community Action
Project
Willow Run Counseling
Proj ect

A

, ,

Ruggers
dump tough
Cleveland
By CHUCK DRUKIS
Michigan's ruggers rolled to
three wins over Cleveland yester-
day, as the Michigan Blue and
Gold squads squeezed out 6-4 and
12-9 victories, respectively, while
the Maize romped to a 17-4 win.
The Michigan Blue played a
"ping-pong policy" strategy in the
first half which resulted in no
progress for either side. At times,
it appeared that the Blue 'offense
was moving only to be stopped
either by a towering Cleveland
forward or one of the Blue back-
field's numerous fumbles. Cleve-
land met the same fate in the first
half.
The second half started out on
the up side for Cleveland. Bill
Dudley covered a short Michigan
kick and charged over the right
corner of Michigan's <goal to put
Cleveland ahead 4-0. Cleveland
continued to dominate the game
until Cleland Child saved the day
for the Blue.
Quickly grabbing the ball out
of a set scrum, he slipped past the
Cleveland scrum half, bolted down
the field only to be tackled several
yards short of the goal. Showing
remarkable endurance and second
effort, Child touched the b a 11
down, recovered his footing, and
carried the ball across the goal
for Michigan's only try.
Andrew Thorburn converted to
give the Blue the lead. Despite
aggressive runs by Cleveland's
George Stevenson and Eric John-
son, Cleveland could not s c o r e
again, leaving the Blue with a
hard fought victory.
After the game, Captain Terry
Larrimer commented on the Blue's
unimpressive efforts at moving
the ball offensively. "The big size
of their forwards upset our loose
play. Our backs never seemed to
fully recover from the jitters. The
result was that we were lucky to
win."
For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
^ Farah
Wright
Lee
Male
CECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

*I

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is pleased to present

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painting and drawing
elementary and jr. high students
Classes begin in late September
Registration and information: BETH URDANG
662-9363 BFA, MFA candidate

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CHRIS WOOD
and friends
(alias TRAFFIC)
inC
Welcome to the Canteen

EREO,'S
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To Michigan

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but the finest live entertainment in town.

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SPECIALITY: ITALIAN FOOD
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(512 E. William)

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