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September 16, 1971 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-16

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T ursday, September 16, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Thu rsdcy, September 6, 1 9 7 1 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

,Oakland
By The Associated Press
CHICAGO-The Oakland A's won
the American League West Division d
championship yesterday, riding Sal
Bando's two-run homer in theJ
eighth inning to a 3-2 victory overi
the Chicago White Sox and 20-
game winner Wilbur Wood in the
opening game of a twi-night dou- NI
bleheader. BILLA
The victory, coupled with run-
ner-up Kansas City's 6-2 loss to
California, gave the A's their first restu and g
title since 1931, when Connie Mack and ready,"
directed the Philadelphia Athletics
Ito the American League pennant. McLain n
Bando, who blasted a Wilbur DETROIT-
Wood knuckler after Reggie Jack- and Jim No
son doubled in the eighth, said night, sparki
clinching the pennant was a big to a 4-2 victo
relief to the A's. ton Senators
"We were trying too hard and McLain ther
not scoring any runs lately," said loser of thes
Bando. "It's a big load off our Joe Colema
minds because we were spinning first inning a]
our wheels and standing still." a personalr
Finley, who moved from the losses as he
press box after the first game to
a box seat behind1 the A's dugout seven hits an
for the finale, said "we haven't a career high
won the real American League Rodriguez,1
pennant, yet," referring to the A's with Coleman
playoff with the East Division win- withCom+
ner - probably the Baltimore last
I Orioles. Northrup hom
"It's been such a good year, the Tigers w
it would be a disappointment not Mickey Stan]
to be in the World Series," said a bases-load
the flamboyant owner who acquired 9-20, a 31-gym
the A's in 1961 and moved them
from Kansas City to Oakland in ago.
1968.
Regarding the A's pennant i B
clinching with 13 games left,
Bando said there were two ways Alex Karr
of looking at the long wait until waivers by
the playoffs. earlier this
"First, it's true, we may not last nightt

clinches,
Cubs crunch'
ily NEW YORK - Billy Williams
i clubbed a ninth-inning homer and
young Burt Hooton pitched a three-,
0 r is I hitter as the Chicago Cubs edgedl
the New York Mets 3-2 for a sweep-
I ing of a twi-night doubleheader
GHT EDITOR : yesterday.
ALTERMAN Bill Hands pitched a five-hitter
and drove in two runs in Chicago's
opening-game victory.
et our pitching primed Hooton pitched 623 innings of
M I no-hit ball, before the Mets broke
!the spell with two out in the sev-
wortified l enth. In recording the victory in
- Aurelio Rodriguez his first major league decision, he
'rthrup homered last struck out 15, breaking the club
i record.

AL.
Ty Cobb on the all-time RE
* * *

West

list.

Cards bucked
PITTSBURGH - Dock Ellis won
his 19th game of the season and
Al Oliver belted a two-run homer
as the Pittsburgh Pirates edged
closer to the National League East
title with a 4-1 victory over the St.
Louis Cardinals last night.
The victory built the Pirates',
lead over the second-place Car-
dinals to 8 12games. Any combina-
tion of five Pittsburgh victories
and St. Louis losses will clinch it
for the Pirates.

snapped a tie with a seventh-inning
home run and the New York
Yankees went on to whip the Bal-
timore Orioles 4-2 last night.
Murcer's 24th homer sent Bal-
timore's 18-game winner, Mike
Cuellar, his ninth loss and gave
the victory to Steve Kline, 11-13.
Ron Swobodp. sewed up the
game in the ninth for the Yanks
with a two-run single. Brooks Rob-
inson hit his 17th homer in the
ninth for the Orioles.
New York took a 1-0 lead in the
third inning on Ron Hansen's sec-
ond homer of the year but Balti-
.,. * ore amebacRto ie i intil

-Associated Press
TOM OKKER of the Netherlands initiated a new tactic in an attempt to return the volley hit by his
American opponent Stan Smith. The racket is designed to work by itself when a remote control
switch is pulled in a blade of grass. Okker and Smith were playing in the semi-finals -of the men's
singles in the U.S. Open Tennis Championships Tuesday. Smith' defeated Okker in that match and
went on yesterday to defeat Czechoslovakia's Jan Kodes in four sets for the Open title.

Lng thne Detrot lgers
ry over the Washing-
and making Denny
majors first 20-game
season.
an survived a ragged
nd won his 18th game,
record, against eight
held the Senators to
nd struck out 12, also
h.
who came to Detroit
in the McLain trade
nered in the first and
mered in the sixth for
'ho also got runs on
ley's RBI single and
ed walk off McLain,
me winner three years
ulletin
ras, who was put on
y the Detroit Lions
week, was reported
to have signed with
geles Rams.

* * *
Angels atgelic
KANSAS f CITY-Andy Messer-
smith fired a four-hitter and spark-
ed a four-run second inning with
a two-run homer as the California
Angels hammered the Kansas City
Royals 6-2 last night.
Kansas City's loss combined
with a victory by Oakland in the
first game of a twi-night double-
header clinched the American
League West pennant for Oakland.
** *
Astros turfed
HOUSTON-Phil Niekro pitched
a four-hitter and Hank Aaron
crashed his 44th home run last
as thesAtlanta Braves defeated
the Houston Astros 4-2.
Aaron unloaded the 636th homer
of his career in the fifth after the
Braves had seized a 3-1 lead
against Jack Billingham, 8-15.
It was Aaron's 14th homer in
the last 24 games, bringing him
within one of his personal one-
season high set in 1962 at Mil-
waukee. It also brought Hammerin'
Hank his 1,954th career run-batted
in, tying him for third place with

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

NATIONAL LEAGUE
East

Baltimore
Detroit
Boston
New York
Washington
Cleveland
Oakland
Kansas City
Chicago
California
Minnesota
Milwaukee

W L
89 54
84 65
77 73
75 73
58 87
57 89
West
94 55
79 69
70 79
70 79
68 78
64 84
Results

Pet,
.622
.565
.514
.508
.399
.388
.632
.533
.468
.468
.465
.431

GB
8
15/
1612
32
33Y2
-4 f
24
24
241/
2912

Pittsburgh
St. Louis
New York
Chicago
Montreal
Philadelphia
S. Francisco
Los Angeles
Atlanta
Houston
Cincinnati
San Diego

W
91
82
77
76
65
61
West
83
82
76
73
72
55
Results

L
59
67
72
73
82
88
65
66
74
76
78
93

Pct.
.608
.550
.516
.510
.442
.408
.561
.554
.507
.489
.480
.372

GB
13
14
24Y2
292
1
8
12
28

* * * more came back to tie it in the
l osixth on successive singles by
Ori es o eMerv Rettenmund, Boog Powell
BALTIMORE - Bobby Murcer I and Frank Robinson.
Major League Standings

NEW ERAy:
. King, Smith

Boston 6, Cleveland 5
New York 4, Baltimore 2
Detroit 4, Washington 2
California 6 Kansas City 2
Oakland 3-3 at Chicago 2-7
Minnesota 1, Milwaukee 0

Chicago 6, New York 11st
Chicago 3, New York 2 2d
Montreal 1, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 1
Atlanta 4, Houston 2
Cincinnati at S. Francisco, inc.
San Diego at Los Angeles, Inc.

win

I
Ai

1

I

FOREST HILLS, N.Y. (P)-Stan Smith, a 6-foot-4 beanstalk serv- Billie Jean said. "The people here
Smith of Pasadena, Calif., a tow- ing military duty at Fort McNair, have been good to me, but I al-
ering army private with a thun- Va., cut down giant-killer Jan ways seem to tense up at Forest
derclap service, and Billie Jean Kodes of Czechoslovakia 3-6, 6-3, Hills."
King, firebrand daughter of a 6-2, 7-6 in a match of go-for-broke Billie Jean clinched the match
K Long B e a c h, Calif., fireman, winners, few rallies and costly with an overhead smash, winning
smashed their way to singles titles double-faults. the tie-break in the second set 5-2.
in the 'U.S. Open Tennis Chain- IMrs. King. three times a Wim- Smith, an independent pro, col-
pionships yesterday for the first bledon winner but victor here only lected $20,000-a purse which he
American sweep in 16 years. once before, in 1967, won over her said he will turn over to the U.S.
A new era dawned for American longtime friend and former dou- Lawn Tennis Associatiop's Davis
tennis, overshadowed for nearly bles partner, Rosemary Casals of Cup fund. Kodes collected $7,500
two decades by an unending flow San Francisco, 6-4, 7-6. and he said he's kee ing it.
of Austrialians. "I love to win the New York" Asked if he would turn over his
~_ _ winnings to the Czech tennis as-
sociation, he said: "My govern-,
ment doesn't pay my expenses, so
why should they take my money?"
$5,000, plus $2,500 exp nse money,
defense Vwoes while Rosemary cclle cts $2.500,
plus expenses. Both cha mpions re-
B ceive new cars.
By JIM EPSTEIN . The last time Americans won
Quarterbacks have been a source of pride to Purdue University both the men's and womrn's sin-
over the last few decades, but, ironically, it was a lack of sufficient gles in the same year was 1959
quarterbacking which last year sent the Boilermakers to their first when Tony Trabert captured the
losing season since 1956. male title and Doris Hart the wo-
Coach Bob DeMoss, now in his second year as head coach, started men's crown.
the 1970 season in search of a man to fill the void left by the departed Both Smith, a big, slugging type
Mike Phipps. After a lengthy and well-publicized trial period, DeMoss of player, and Kodes, a clay court
settled on sophomore Chuck Piebes as his signal caller. specialist renowned for his quick-
Piebes proved not to be the answer to the Riveter's helmsman ness and lightning reflexes, were
woes, and after the sixth game, a 38-14 loss to Northwestern, he saw below the standard the set in
little action for the duration of the season. winning semi-final vicoies Tue -
* DeMoss turned to another sophomore, Gary Danielson, to take day over Tom Okkr of he J Neth-
erlands and Arthur Asher,- of
the reins of the offense, and he hit on 39 of 98 passes over the season Richmond, Va., respectively.
and was intercepted ten times. Kodes served eight double-faults,
Despite his inauspicious performance Danielson was dubbed two at break game points. Smith
starting quarterback for the 1971 season and Piebes has been ban- was sluggish in his volleying and
ished to the defensive backfield where he will play safety. reached his greatest heights in the
Pressing Danielson for the signal caller job is sophomore Steve tie-break that climaxed the match
+Burke who may start against Washington this Saturday if Danielson, I in the fourth set.
who injured his thumb, is unable to play. It was the sixth tie-brak in the
The Boilermakers have three Chicago area players to fill out tournament for Smith, and he's
their starting backfield led by halfback Otis Armstrong, who set the won them all.
single season Purdue rushing record last year as a sophomore. Arm- "It's a different kind of game,"
strong's 1009 yards rushing eclipsed the mark set by former all- Smith said. "You cram all your
American Leroy Keyes. . concentration, wits arnd guts into
v# Darryl Stingley, the Boilermakers' leading pass receiver at those last nine point."
flanker last year, has been switched to halfback as Armstrong's run- I :...
ning mate. 8 .
Four seniors and a junior anchor the offensive line and should
provide solid protection for the Purdue backs. Tom Luken, a pre- A Tae Kwon :o 1 arate
season all-America choice by some pundits, has: switched from guard demonstration and a quarterly
to tackle recently and should prove to be one of the best linemen in promotion tet wl he held at
the Big Ten. 7:00 PM a t"au on Hb : hool,
The defense is a lot younger as a unit, with seven juniors and one j Fuller Road "t urnr rkway'
sophomore figuring to start. Mammoth Steve Baumgartner (6-7, 250) i Friday, Septm sr 17.
will lead the charge from defensive end, while Jim Teal, a two
year starter and aonther pre-season pick for someone's all-America
team leads the linebackers.
Charlie Potts, a starter at cornerback in 1970 will hold down the W
ripper spot, Purdue's omninous sounding name for rover, this fall We t.
and will be joined by Piebes as the deep man. Arnold Carter, a senior,
and Chuck Knox, the only sophomore starter at this point, figure to OPEN 6 DAYS
win their battles for the corners.
The Purdue press guide has dubbed DeMoss the 'Upset Engineer' The D co s
and he will have a chance to fill the bill as his charges will be decided
underdogs in their first two encounters, against Washington and cross Arborland-E. Liberty
state rival Notre Dame. The outlook shows a comfortable spot in the Maple Village
*middle of the Big Ten pack for Purdue with a chance to upset any East U. at So. U.
of the leaders if everything clicks one day.

REDSKIN CLAIM VOIDED:
Iarras cops free agent status

From Wire Service Reports
The National Football League
voided the Washington Redskins'
claim on' defensive tackle Alex
Karras, a team Karras had
turned down earlier in the day.
The league office in New York
said the Redskins' "claim can-
not be effected because Karras'
contract is by its term non-as-
signable."
Washington had claimed the
veteran all-pro defensive star
when he was waived Monday by
the Detroit Lions.
The league statement said Kar-
-ras "has cleared waivers for
1971," which makes him a free
agent and able to sign with
whomever he chooses.
Shocked by the Lions' move,
Karras said he would only play
for a contender. It was rumored
he might sign with the Los An-
geles Rams.
"I'm grateful for the offer but
no thanks," Karras told Red-
skins' Coach George Allen during
a telephone conversation.
Karras, who has two years to
go on his $35,000 a year pact
with the Lions was just about set
to start his 13th season with the
NationalhFootball League Club
before the ax fell Monday night
as he was in New York pre-
For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
~'Wright
Lee
Male
$CIIECKMAT E
State Street at iberty

paring to tape a segment for the
Johnny Carson TV show.
"The whole thing. stinks," Kar-
ras said yesterday after a night's
sleep on his problem." I feel
worse than I did Tuesday."
The Lions' dismissal of Kar-
ras, long noted in the NFL for his
ability to demolish opposing quar-
terbacks, touched off a storm of
criticism of the Lions' front of-
fice.
Phone lines at the Lions office
rang yesterday with fans call-
ing to register their protests and
the Detroit News said its switch-
board received more than a thou-
sand protest calls.
Karras said he got the word
from Lions Coach Joe Schmidt
in the phone call.

"When they told me Joe wanted I
to talk to me, I figured he
wanted to talk something over
with me," said Karras. "Then he
mumbled something about me be-
ing put on waivers.'
"When I asked him 'Why', he
didn't have much of an answer,"
said Karras. "I asked him if it
was his decision or the front of-
fice andhe said it was his."
The outspoken Karras said
Wednesday, "I never got along
with Russ Thomas, Lions general
manager."
Schmidt told newsmen, "The
decision was made solely by my-
self. Nobody from the front of-
fice approached me and told me
to get rid of Alex Karras."

stay real sharp mentally. But, sec- the Los An;
ondly, it gives us a lot of time to

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OF THE
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ANNOUNCING-
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