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September 16, 1971 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-16

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Thursday, September 16, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Thursday, September 16, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

ENGIN SCHOOL COURSE:

Environmental program

begins

Chishoim to become candidate
in presidential primaries

By HANNAH MORRISON
The new environmental sci-
ence engineering program of-
fers "a veritable shopping list"
of course options ,says its stu-
dent coordinator.
Proposed last year by en-
gineering students and faculty,
the program, which begins this
semester, will involve nearly
every department in the col-
lege. Although the department
of civil engineering offered to
sponsor it, student coordinator
Mike McGill says, "Everyone
wanted to have their foot in the

door with an issue as hot as
ecology.';
As a result, the program will
require twenty credit hours in
environmental science courses,
culled from the departments of
chemistry, meteorology and
oceanography, geology, zoology
and chemical engineering. It
will also offer a sequence of
courses to be chosen by the stu-
dent in conjunction with an ad-
visor, in addtion to the engi-
neering prerequisites.
Due to a lack of funds, there
is no separate budget for the
ecology . program. Instead, it is

being supported by the existing
departments.
The only course which has
been specifically created for the
program is a senior seminar to
focus on analyzing a particular
environmental p r o b 1 em.
This will be first offeredduring
the winter term.
Presently, ten students are
enrolled in the program. Prof.
Jonathan Bulkley, chairman of
the student - faculty committee
supervising the program, says,
"We didn't publicize extensive-
ly for this semester."

Peace activists release tapes
on POW anti-war movement

"In the winter term, when it
really gets going, the program
should be able to accommodate
"between 50 and 100 stu-
dents," he adds.
"Student interest has been
considerable," he says.
Participants in the program
are encouraged to earn another
degree says McGill, to be linked
to an established department.
"You can't lose anything by
taking two degrees," he claims:
"It's a matter of faith that
graduates of the program will
be employed, but the analysis
of environmental debris appears
to be an endless task which re-
quires special skills," Bulkley
states.
In addition, a general engi-
neering degree has been created
which Engineering Dean Gor-
don Van Wylen compares to the
Bachelor of General Studies, of-
fering minimal engineering re-
quirements and maximum elec-
tives. "We want to give flexibili-
ty to those who are uncertain
about engineering as a career,"
says Van Wylen.
Some of the existing depart-
ments have been either nar-
rowed or expanded. There are
now separate degrees offered in
both computer and electrical en-
gineering. The same is true in
the departments of metallurgi-
cal and chemical engineering.

NEW YORK (P) - Shirley I tiny towns, and wealthy contribu-
Chisholm, the only black woman tors have offered large sums to
in Congress says she will an- back her candidacy, she said. The
nounce formally her candidacy money has been pouring in at such
for the presidency on New Year's a rate that she has had to open
Day and enter at least three of a special postal box in her dis-
the Democratic primaries - if trict in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuy-
she can raise enough money to vesant.
finance her campaign. "My campaign might well be
The 47-year-old New York the downfall of my career but I
congresswoman said she would- feel I have to do it. I am a revolu-
enter primaries in North Caro- tionary at heart now, and I in-
lina, Florida and California if tend to act as a catalyst for
she can raise $100,000. She said change."
she believed she could take at She has emerged this year as a
least 35 per cent of the vote in prime mover in the new National
each primary through her sup- Women's political Caucus and
port from women. young peo- likes to remind critics of the
ple and the minorities. feminist political movement that
"I'm doing it to shake the sys- -- -
tem up," she said in an interview.
"This country is run by old,
old men from the South, and I *KNEED A PLACE T
want to make the people at the
national convention know they
will have to deal with me."
Chisholmsad atwohfmthe pres- m
idential aspirants - she would
not name them - have approach- still has a fe
ed her about being a possible vice
prosidential running mate. HUNGRY? Boo
"I tell them to wait and see,"
she said in clipped West Indian North Campus
tones. "It will be up to my peo-
ple. I am their instrument. I -mn-Family style lunch an
unbossed and unbought."
"Dollars for Chisholm" outlets -Free laundry
have sprouted in big cities and Cost2 $55 per month
* APPLY NOW AT 15
i1st OR CALL 663-6206

women represent 53 per cent of
the vote.
She said she scored another
coup by being selected as floor
manager for national day care
center legislation when it comes
up for House vote in a few
weeks.
"If I let the people who criti-
cize me for my policies and insult
me because of my race bother me,
I'd have either a breakdown or
an ulcer,"she said. "I'd like to
think tenacity of purpose and
strength of character are my best
personal assets. I don't want to be
remembered as the black women
who ran for president; I'd like to
be remembered for my guts."
TO LIVE?
)pus Co-ops
w openings for girls
ird at one of the
Boarding Co-ops
d dinner 7 days a week
plus 3 hours work per week
00 GILBERT COURT
FOR INFORMATION

APPLE ROSE
Natural Foods
is a melow grocery three
blocks west of Main with
free parking
404 W. Liberty
769-3040 9-6 Mon. -Sat,
For the student body:
& Genuine
y Authentic
Navy
PEA COATS
$25
Sizes 34to0
CHEtCKMATbEry
State Street at Liberty

WASHINGTON (P) - American
peace activists released yesterday
tapes which they said showed U.S.
prisoners of'war held by the Viet
Cong have formed an antiwar
movement of their own.
The tapes were brought back
by a pacifist delegation which
visited Hanoi last month and re-
present the first material relating
to POWs in the South given to
American visitors to 'North Viet-
nam.
Copies of the tapes and trans-
cripts were given to The Associat-
ed Press by representatives of the
Vietnam Veterans Against t h e
War and the Committee of Liai-
son with Families of Servicement
Detained in North Vietnam.
The four speakers whose voices
are .heard on the/ tape make anti-
war statements critical of the U.S.
role in Vietnam and calling for
support of the Communists' seven-
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16
Day Calendar
Physics Colloquium: Victor Wong
"A New Look at Elementary Excita-
tion in Helium," Phys. Lounge, Randall
Lab, 4 pm.
The Thomas M. Cooley Lectures:
Louis Jaffe. "Program Control," 100
Hutchins Hall, 4:15 pm.
School of Music: James Hemman,
organ, Hill Aud., 8 pm.
General Notices
Faculty Research Grant and Fellow-
ship applications due at Graduate Sch.
by Fri., Oct. 1; grant funding begins
Jan. 1, 1972; fellowship tenure may
be requested for Spring-Summer Term
'72. Fall Term '72, or Winter Term '73,
PLEASE NOTE THIS IS THE ONLY
APPLICATION PERIOD FOR FACUL-
TY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS DUR-

point peace program pending in
Paris.
One of the speakers identified
himself as John Arthur Young, a
green beret who was captured
near Da Nang in January 1968.
A~nother said he was Maj. Floyd
Kuchner. an Army doctor c a p-
tcred four years ago. The o t h e r
two were not identified.
"We as captured GIs have had
the opportunity to see it from
both sides," one of the unidenti-
fied voices said. "We feel this
m akes us qualified tosbring out
e the true nature of this war and
our administration's policies.
"We have already started a pro-
gram of action," the voice said.
"We have sent letters and re-
cordings to congressmen, the
American people and the GIs, to
ING THIS ACADEMIC YEAR; second
applic, period for Grants only, ends
Feb. 4, 1972: previously announced
deadlines were Sept. 24 and Jan. 28.
Placement Service
Career Planning & Placement, 3rd
Fl. SAB, 764-7460.
ATTZNTION: SRS AND GRAD STU-
DENTS RECEIVING DEGREES IN '71-
72: GRAD II, free computerized sys-
tem for matching grads with potential
employers available; come in and pick
ip forms; deadline Oct. 11, (Engineer-
ing and Grad Bus. Ad. students, con-
sult your respective Placement Of-
fices.)
Organization Notices
Each Club Meeting, Sept. 16. 8:00
PM .South Quad West Lounge Featur-
Lee & David Volckhausen (flute
& piano).
Gay Liberation, Open Meeting, Sept.
16, 8:30 PM, Michigan Union 3rd
Floor, North wing, Heath Lounge.
Gay Liberation Open House, Sept. 17,
6-midnight, Canterbury, over Mark's,
William St.
U. M. Amateur Radio Club, W8UM,
Organizational Meeting, Sept. 16, 7:00
PM in 2075 E. Engineering Bldg.

the antiwar organizations and
even the President to let every-
one know we are opposed to this
war."
Kushner's statement said he
had at first declined to make any
public statements on the war des-
pite the urgings of his captors,
But he said his mind was chang-
ed by news from the United
States.

Local restaurants swel
state liquor license ap

Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

i

p~icati0os

(Continued from Page 1)
to the state concerning the num-
ber of licenses to be issued, has
determined to activate ten new
licenses as soon as possible. The
rest will be issued at the rate of
one or two a year over the next
ten ,years,
Starting with a list of 35 appli-
cants who had filed their re-
quests for licenses with the
Michigan Liquor Control Com-
mission as of December, 1970, the
city's Special Liquor Committee
compiled a list of ten applicants
to which it gave tentative ap-
proval in July.
If the applicants pass the in-
spections by the city and the
state, the licenses will be issued
within the next few months.
Four of the ten are located in
the immediate central campus
vicinity: Best Steak House, Domi-
nck's Pizza, Charcoal House
Restaurant and the Bell Tower
Inn.
Also on the list for tentative ap-
proval are the Heritage House
Restaurant; Curtis Restaurant

c
,j,
i
3
t
£
i4
t
1

and Mallis Coffee Cup.
Among the applicants who have
applied in the last two months-
are the Brown Jug; the Wolverine
Den; and Cottage Inn.
Barring an unlikely interven-
tion by City Council, it will be

some time before any of these
three receive their licenses from
the state. However, due to the
foresight of those who applied
early, it seems likely that the
campus thirst will still be
quelched.

i

Faculty unions discussed

(Continued from Page 1)
ational policies".
A poll taken recently at the
University reflects this grow-
ing mood. The poll, taken by
the AAUP last spring showed
that a high percentage of the
faculty were interested in at
least exploring the possibilities
of unionization.

While a committee of Senate
Assembly, the faculty represen-
tative body, has urged caution
in taking up the step of unioni-
zation, their report, issued this
summer, opened the door for
further exploration of the sub-
ject.

I-

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FORMER JACKIE 763-6437
MEMBERS
CALL: DONNA 662-9727
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LAW SCHOOL
MIXER
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Music by Salmagundi
BEER, BAND, FOOD
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