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September 14, 1971 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-14

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 14, 1971

Pag Te TH MIHIGN DILYTueday Setemer 41 97

Blood, tear gas, and death meet
observers at Attica state prison

ATTICA, N.Y. UP)-Blood, the
stench of tear gas and tales of
terror greeted observers who en-
tered Attica state prison yester-
day after hundreds of law offi-
cers crushed a four-day inmate
uprising.
"If they resisted, they were
shot," said one policeman. "We
had a job to do."
Nine hostages died in the ac-
tion and one, police said, was

also sexually mutilated. Twenty-
eight prisoners were killed.
"Yes, there was a lot of blood,"
said Richard Smith a Buffalo
school teacher who had medical
training in the Army and work-
ed as a medical aide at the
prison after the rebellion was put
down. "There were a number of
deaths right in front of me. It
was very depressing."
Smith, whose green hospital

Sex bias ease appealed*
Clark charges U' sexist
(Continued from Page 1) facet of it won't really be dem
Harriet Mills, Clark's case isn't strated," she says.

non-

the ideal test case for the new ap-
peal procedure.
"One of the prime factors of the
new procedure is that it offers
more opportunity for obtaining in-
formation in a case. Since we've
already gained most of the infor-
mation about Cheryl Clark, that

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
Day Calendar
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
Physics Seminar: Dr. Marc Ross,
"Strong Perlpheraism pi n Scattering,"'
P & A Colloquium Rm, 4 pm.
Computing Center: "Basic Use of the
Keypunch," Seminar Rm, Computing
Ctr, 4, 5 pm.; "Advanced Use of the
Keypunch," Seminar Rm, Com. Ctr.,
4:30, 5:30 pm.
Physical Educ. Dept. is forming two
dance companies (dir. by E. Bergman
& V .Embree): Auditions held in Dance
Studio, Barbour Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Career Planning & Placement, 3rd
Floor, Student Activities Bldg., 764..7460.
ATTENTION: SENIORS AND GRAD
CTUDENTS RECEIVING DEGREES IN
71-72: GRAD II, free computerized sys-
tem for matching graduates with poten-
tial employers is avail; come in and
pick up forms: deadline for completed
forms, Oct. 11. (Engineering and Grad
Bus Ad students, consult your respec-
tive Placement Offices.)
INTERVIEWING TODAY: U.S. Navy &
U.S. Marine recruiters available to dis-
cuss career programs with interested
students. Stop in CPP.
JOBS IN TIE A.A. AREA: For more
info. call our office.
Classified Advert. Sales, for newspa-
per; prefer person with degree.
Finance Trainee in Det., 'B.S. in bus.
ad., finance, etc; high grades.
Bus. Mgr., Detroit, B.A. in bus. or
acctg; should have exper.
Coord. Professional Serv., Detroit,
grad degree in behavioral sci., exper in
supr.; MSW or certification for psych.
testing.
Security Guards, A.A. 3 jobs open,
two-40 hrs, one-32 hrs.
ISRAELI FOLK
DANCING
Every Wednesday
8:30
HILLEL
Social Hall
Eastern Michigan
University
presents
Mary Travers
with Livingston Taylor
SATURDAY,
Sept. 18, 1971
8:30 p.m.
BOWENFIELD HOUSE
Tickets: 3.50, 2.50, 1.50
Available:
U. of M. Ticket Service
Eastern's McKenny Union
All JL Hudson Stores
Tickets also available at
Michigan Union

But this makes Clark's case no
less important. Says Zena Zu-
meta, University women's repre-
sentative, "The outcome of this
case will be very indicative of the
future of sex discrimination cases
on this campus. If Clark gets a
fair hearing under the new pro-
cedures, it will be encouraging to
other women."~
Clark's lawyer, associate law
professor Harry Edwards, is hope-
ful that a more equitable settle-
ment can be reached under the
new appeal proceedings. "The pro-
cedural difficulties were so great
the last time the case was heard
that there was no conceivable way
to get any kind of justice," he said
yesterday.
"We are hoping that the pres-
ence of an impartial person on the
board which hears cases will
make a more equitable settlement
possible."
Under the new procedure, the
case is heard by a three-member
ber committee, one member of
which is to be chosen by the grie-
vant and one by the Dean or ad-
ministrative department head in-
volved. Those two members select
a third member from a 7-mem-
ber panel appointed by President
Robben Fleming after consulta-
tion with the Senate Advisory
Committee on Women, and the
Commission on Minorities.
It is hoped that the third mem-
ber chosen will be an unbiased
party who is in no way related to
the case.
President Fleming has yet to
appoint the 7-member committee
which will become one-third of
the decision making power in all
future bias cases. Until this task
is performed, proceedings for
Clark's case can not get under-
way.
A law passed recently by the
Michigan legislature will also give
Clark a better chance of achiev-
ing salary equity within the Uni-
versity. The bill, which made the
concept of "equal pay for equal
work" applicable to all levels of
employes defined discrimination
as anything which causes two
people doing the same work to
receive unequal pay.
The University, hoyever, did not
grant back pay to Clark last May
because she did not prove overt
or intentional discrimination
against her.

smock was streaked with blood
as he stepped out of the prison
gate for a breath of fresh air,
said "it resembled the after-
math of a war. That's the only
thing it can be compared to."
Most of the exhausted police-
men who stumbled through the
gates were grim-faced and hag-
gered. They refused to talk to
newsmen, and those who did
declined to identify themselves.
One of the latter said the bulk
of the action took place in an
S to 10-minute period. He said
the state policemen :ad used
tunnels and catwalks t invade
the area held by the rebels.
He said those hostages who
were not slaughtered were free
'about a minute and a half after
the firing started."
"They had us lined up and
were proceeding to execute us
by cutting our throats," said
Capt. Frank Wall, one of the
hostages who escaped. He was
saved by sharpshooters. "They
got the man who was going tc
cut my throat just as he began
to pull the knife across."
Asked when the slaughter of
the hostages took place, a troop-
er said, "as soon as that heli-
copter came over the wall."
Another trooper, who also de-
clined to identify himself, said
that many of the inmates lay
down quickly in surrender "when
the first gas was dropped."
Another of the hostages who
survived the ordeal was Gary
Walker, a guard who lives in
Attica a few hundred yard;s from
the prison. He said a black in-
mate had a knife at his throat
when the helicopters first swung
into action.
"I fell to the ground and roil-
ed under a =bench, closing my
eyes. The next thing I saw 'as
the troopers running across the
yards towards us."
Other troopers reported that
they found two prisoners killed,
apparently by fellow. inmates.
They were in the same cell in
cellblock B and were stabbed
and their throats slashed.
Police gathered baseball bats,
clusb, gasoline bombs and two
homemade spears and stored
them in 6-foot-long boxes.
Most of the prisoners surrend-
ered immediately, said one po-
liceman, who speculated that
many prisoners were forced into
the rebellion by "the muscles."
Cellblock D, center of resist-
ance, was littered with clothes
and makeshift tents of wood and
bedsheets. The captured pris-
oners were taken to another cell-
block, stripped, taken to the
showers, reclothed and placed
three to a cell in other sections
of the prison. Several hundred of
the prisoners will be maved to
other institutions within the next
few days.
Prison officials made she first
roll call in five days in late af-
ternoon and found 2,237 prison-
ers, with eight missing. They
could be hiding or dead, officials
said.
Police said the operation took
three days to plan. It started
with tear gas. "The idea was to
make them so sick that they
would have no will to resist,"
one trooper said.

37 killed z
0 e
rioting at
(Continued from Page 1)
ages to insure their acceptance.
On Friday, the prisoners added
a demand for complete amnesty
and mediators were p'ermitted to
enter and negotiate the hostages
release,
r Bysyesterday, authorities had
agreed to all but two demands-
complete amnesty and removal of
the prison superintendent.
With Gov. Nelson Rockefeller's
approval, State Corrections Com-
missioner Russell Oswald gave up
efforts to negotiate the hostages'
release after nearly four days of
trying. He said the mutineers "cal-
lously herded eight hostages with-
in our view with weapons at their
throats."
At 9:45 a.m., when Oswald's
one-hour ultimatum to the 1,200
rebellious prisoners to release the
hostages was ignored, he un-
leashed the state's armed forces.
They were armed with shotguns
and rifles, and had helicopter sup-
port.
The prisoners, driven back early
in the riot to Cellblock D and its
adjoining yard, had started out
with only clubs and their fists as
weapons. But they had since fash-
ioned homemade knives and a
state spokesman, Jerry Houlihan,
said later:
"We found some had tear gas
guns. They had erected barri-
cades and had electric wire fen-
ces"
Behind volleys of gunfire, the
massed force of troopers, depu-
ties and corrections officials
rushed the convict - controlled
cellblock. A heavy downpour
lashed the prison, its red brick
buildings spread over a 54-acre
compound behind gray, 30-foot
walls.
Above, National Guard heli-
copters dropped can after can of
tear gas into the yard, their
crews ordering the prisoners
over loud speakers:
"Place your hands over-your
heads and surrender to the
nearest police officer. You will
not be harmed."
It took about 90 minutes to
break the riot.
,By late afternoon, the violence
had subsided and authorities
had regained control of the pris-
on. A roll call showed eight pris-

oners missing-either hiding or
dead, officials said.
The violence at Attica spread
an aura of tension to others of
the state's prisons. Some in-
mates were kept locked in their
cells. Precautionary measures
w e r e common against large
gatherings of convicts.
In sheer violence and blood-
shed, the riot at New York's
Attica State Prison was far the
worst in recent American penal
history. The death toll of 37-
nine hostages and 28 inmates-
topped the breakout attempt at
San Quentin in California last
month when three guards and
three prisoners were killed.
Attorney William Kunstler, a
white legal advocate for black
militants, was among a group of
outsiders who tried to mediate
the deadlock over the hostages,
at the request of the rioters. He
accused Rockefeller in the as-
sault on Cellblock D of a "mon-
strous act."
"Officials n e v e r seem to
learn," Kunstler went on, "that
patience is a virtue and, in this

is police quell inmate
Attica prison system

,

case, would have been a life
saver . . . There would have been
room for negotiations if it took
six months, or a year."
Another of the so-called medi-
ators admitted to Attica at the
rioters' request was Black Pan-
ther Chairman Bobby Seale. He
returned to California Sunday,
saying he was delivering a mes-
sage from Attica prisoners to
the Black Panther Central Com-
mittee.
Seale claimed the rioters'
price for release of the Attica
hostages was freedom from the
nation's prisons of all "political
prisoners," including Angela Da-
vis and the Soledad Brothers.
F a c e d with demands they
deemed impossible to satisfy,
state officials came to the con-
clusion that further negotiations
were fruitless.
Rockefeller had refused de-
mands of the rioters that he
come to Attica to discuss their
demands with them. He said he
saw nothing to be served by his
physical presence in the prison
yard.

-Associated Press
HELMETED POLICE collect baseball bats and inspect make-
shift shelters in the Attica State prison yard Monday afternoon
after an inmate rebellion had been quelled.

I

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For Plain 'pants, skirts,
sweaters, sportcoats
59c.
ea.
:Reg. Price 89c
CLEANERS
619 PACKARD
Between Hill & State Street
limited time offer

0o
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a

-Associatea ress
STATE TROOPERS at the main gate of the Attica State Prison
wear gas masks and helmets to protect themselves against the
wind carrying pepper gas fumes from inside the prison.

ii ap

THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
TAE KWON DO CLUB
KOREAN KARATE
1st MEETING AND
DEMONSTRATION
THURS., SEPT. 16 at 7:00 p.m._
in WATERMAN GYM
BEGINNERS WELCOME {
FORMER JACKIE 763-6437
MEMBERS
CALL: DONNA 662-9727
INTERESTED IN CHANGE?
Join THE PROJECT COMMUNITY
(formerly U-M Tutorial Project)
THOMAS A. MOOREHEAD, Director

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189,382 Americans and South Vietnamese
Dead
134,305 NLF and North Vietnamese Dead
Vietnamese, Civilians Dead
And Now Nixon's Wage Freeze
Makes Workers Pay for the War
WNaln hkilA er hoFall An*_War A}Nnn

*

I

MASS MEETING
Wednesday, September 1 5
2nd floor Union Ballroom-7:00 P.M.
For more information contact The Project Community

/ii t

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