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September 14, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

news briefs
By The Associated Press
NIKITA KHRUSHCHEV, former premier of the Soviet Union
and chief of its Communist party, was buried yesterday in
Moscow.
SHis death continued to be virtually ignored in the Soviet Union.
The only official acknowledgements of Khrushchev's death Saturday
were a one-paragraph announcement on the front page of the
Communist Party newspaper Pravda, and 'a funeral wreath sent by
the Communist Party Central Committee and council of Ministers.
CHILE'S NATIONAL AIRLINE is turning to the Soviet Union
for new jets after being refused a loan from the U.S. Export-
Import Bank to buy Boeing aircraft.
A spokesman for Lan-Chile said yesterday a commission ofF
technical experts from the airline will go to Moscow soon to nego-
tiate the purchase of three Soviet jetlines.
The announcement by Lan-Chile, which is owned by. the govern-
ment, was seen as a challenge to the United States by Marxist
President Salvador Allende's Popular-Unity administration.
LT. WILLIAM CALLEY will not be compelled to take the
stand as a defense witness in the murder trial of his former
commander, Capt. Ernest Medina, a military judge ruled yester-
day.

page three

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Datli

Tuesday, September 14, 1971 News Phone: 764-0525

Dollar devaluation

urged
ministers

by Common

Markel

BRUSSELS ()} - The six Common Market finance ministers
agreed last night to press for devaluation of the dollar and adopted
broad outlines for a reorganization of the ailing World monetary
system.
While the ministers didn't spell out dollar devaluation in their
communique, their intention was clear when they called for a re-
alignment of the major world currencies, "including the dollar."
The ministers also endorsed proposals from the Common Market
Commission to replace the dollar as the basic currency of world
exchange with special drawing----- ----- --
rights to the International Mone-
tary Fund. In Mr iSN

THE ALLEY CINEMA
PRESENTS
TONIGHT-TUES., SEPT. 14
SHADOWS
Directed by John Cassavetes, 1960. A young would-
be writer falls in love with a girl who is passing for
white. Music by Charlie Mingus.
SHOWS AT 7 and 9:30 p.m.
330 Maynard
across from Nickels Arcade
* NEW *0NEW tNEW
PROJECTION SCREEN SOUND
BOOTH SYSTEM
$1.00
sponsored by ann arbor film cooperative
Series A, B, D sold out
Series C subscriptions available
MENDELSSOHN LOBBY, Mon.-Fri., 12-4 p.m.

the
has

"I must concede," said Medina's lawyer, F. Lee Bailey, "that
statements that we seek would be incriminatory if Lt. Calley
a retrial."I

THE U.S. LABOR DEPARTMENT is bringing suit against
the United Mine Workers in hopes of setting aside the 1969
election of UMW President W. A. "Tony" Boyle.
Labor Department lawyers charge that Boyle supporters bought
votes, intimidated dissenters, refused to allow neutral polling place
observers and other violations of the Landrum-Griggin Act.
** *
SEN. GEORGE McGOVERN (D-S.D.), is examining the im-
prisonment ofhpolitical opponents of President Nguyen Van Thieu
as well as the U.S aid program that supports the South Viet-,
namese police force and prison program.
McGovern, Democratic presidential hopeful, may make the
problem of political prisoners and U.S. aid to S. Vietnam's police
force an issue in his campaign.
TUNNELING BANK BURGLARS eluded Scotland yard de-
tectives hot on their trail yesterday and escaped through a chain
of sewers with perhaps as much as 500,000 pounds - about
$1.2 million.
Discovered when a ham radio operator intercepted their short-
wave signals, robbers named Bob and Steve talked of having sand-
wiches and tea ready. Their only problem, they said, was that
smoke kept accumulating in the bank vault as they cut their way in.

Calley ri
Lt. William Calley arrives in Ft
the court martial of Capt. Ernest
FIND N. VIET BA:
S. Vilets e1(
SAIGON () - South Vietnam-
ese jungle troops pushed to with-
in half a mile of the Laos border
yesterday iri their week-old drive
below the demilitarized zone. They
uncovered a North Vietnamese
operations base and large amounts
of war material.
The find consisted of three big;
Soviet artillery pieces which, along

The agreement will enable the
Common Market to make its eco-
nomic power felt more decisively
in upcoming international mone-
tary conferences weighing Presi-
dent Nixon's economic measures to
improve the U.S. position in world
y trade.
The proposals were part of a
basic six-point package that also
called for stricter curbs on mone-
tary speculation, equilibrium in
-Associated Press international payment relations.,
S for trial an end to the U.S. one per cent
surcharge on imports and a
. McPherson, Ga., to testify in strengthening of authority of the
Medina. (See News Briefs). International Monetary Fund.
- EWhile envisioning a replacement
"I of the dollar as the world's re-
serve currency, the C o n o n
Market ministers' outline included
a continuing role for gold in in-
t L os ternational finarice. But it was
not clear how gold and Special
Drawing Rights - SDR - would
with the other arms and supplies, be tied together.
were left behind by Hanoi's forces "International liquidity should
when they pulled back into Laos continue to be based on gold and
underspounding by U.S. B-52 to a growing extent on instru-
bonmbers. ments collectively created and
Other material found and de- managed on an international
trhyerbyatheraouhVitndadescale. This implies adapting and
stroyed by the South Vietnamese Ideveloping a system of SDR's
included three Soviet made trucks, ytm o D'
6.000 liers t oetman 1,5r00 while decreasing gradually the imp
gallons of gasoline, 200 mortar portance of national currencies as
rounds, 5,000 meters, or slightly reserve units," the ministers said,
more than 5,000 yards, of tele- oMore pressing in their order
ie.-of priorities was the realignment
phone wire and 43 bags of ofarities which they said

backs strong
export drive
'WASHINGTON (MA---- A presi-
dential commission urged the Nix-
on administration yesterday to
launch a vigorous U.S. export
drive during this decade, w h i1e
pushing to wipe out all w o rl d
trade barriers within 25 years.
The 27-member Commission on
International Trade and Invest-
mentPolicy called fornthernation
to face what it called new realities
of international economic life and,
help restore the United States'
once-premier position in w o r 1 cl
trade.
Some of its recommendations al-
ready have beencadopted by Pre-
sident Nixon, including one to im-
pose a temporary import tax while
the nation's balance-of-payments
deficit persists.
But the presidentially appointed
commission came down hard on
the side of free trade, urging
against widespread restrictions
that could cause even more re-
strictions. It said the m a j o r
world powers should begin now
talks aimed at ending all s u c h
barriers within the next quarter
century.
"The world has changed radi-
cally from the one we knew after
World War II," it said. "We be-
liever it is imperative that t h e
United States, in its own interest,
bring its international trade and
investment policies into line with.
the new realities."
Recognizing the realities means
relaxing national policies that
have held back the volume of
what the United States sells to
other countries, the commission's
three-volume report said.

TRAINED BY CIA
U.S Outfits Laotian guerrillas
WASHINGTON {4') - T h e the Central Inteligence Agency. also is supporting some 40,000 Lao
United States is supporting about , Continuation of the operation, Communist Forces.
30.000 troops in special guerrilla supplementing regular Lao govern- Against this attack, Johnson
units in Laos, Senate testimony ment forces, was termed as essen- said, the Lao government has been
reported yesterday. tial part of the Nixon administra- able to raise about 85,000 soldiers,'
Ambassador G. McMurtie God-, tion policy of Vietnamization of including irregular forces.
Abs G.o the war in Indochina. Godley said the Lao irregulars,
1.%rgTUaSecretary of DefenseaMelvin

South Vietnamese troops also
reported finding bodies of 32 more
North Vietnamese soldiers killed
by U.S. air strikes. Military spokes-
men said this raised to 64 the
number of bombing victims found
since the Saigon forces began
their drive Sept.. 6.

V aI VV 1L1, V J Q ,
"willPiave to take place in such
conditions that sharing t h e
burden of adjustment takes in-
to account evolution of the re-
lative economic situation of the
currencies concerned."
See DOLLAR, Page 7

The operation, consisting of 13,-
500 South Vietnamese troops is! trie still on
centered in the northwest cornerS
of the country, in the Khe Sanh at O.C.C.C.
region.

ley, U.tS. ambassador at larg
the troops are recruited i
and are equipped and train
Read Dail
Classified

e, di Secretaxy of Defense Melvin
n Laos Laird told the Senate Armed Serv-k
ned by ices Committee in July, in secret
testimony made public yesterday,!
that to halve this year's $407 mil-I
lion budget for U.S. expendituresE
Y in Laos, as proposed by Sen. Stu-t
art Symington (D-Mo.), would
amount to abandoning the pro-1
s gram.
North Vietnam has about 80,-1
000 troops in Laos, he said, and

organized into special guerrilla
battalions of about 330 men each,
"have been the backbone of the!
military effort in Laos."
The units, he said, are supplied,
equipped, trained and paid by theI
CIA.
The U.S. also, he said, s u p-
ports an undisclosed number of'
Thai soldiers recruited for service
in Laos under Lao government
command.

So far, there has been no ground
fighting of any consequence. In-
stead, the major war action was
taken over by the Thailand-based
B52 bombers. B52 crews flew 24
combat strikes during the d a y
against North Vietnamese infiltra-
tion routes and troop positions in
the Khe Sanh area and in the
southern half of the DMZ.--

Striking teachers at Oakland
County Community College met
early yesterday and voted not
to obey a court order that they
return to classes this morning.
Strikers' demands include a
pay hike of 15 per cent and in-
creased hiring of instructors.
Meanwhile, the first teacher
strike in Lansing's history end-
ed yesterday with tentative
agreement on a new two-year
contract. The strike lasted six
days, and kept 33,500 students
from their classes.

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