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January 22, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FPage Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, January 22, 1972

TH IHGNDIL audy anay2,17

1

Af~

MICHIGAN UNION BILLIARDS

Christiansen tabbed RANKED RELAYERS READY:
Stanford grid mentor Tankers primed for MSU invasion

FREE INSTRUCTION
THURS., JAN. 27th
7-9 p.m.

PLAY POOL 1/ PRICE
All this week
thru Saturday

By The Associated Press

Stanford picked a formeer pro
coach and Georgia Tech turned to
j California was expected to announ-
an' alumnus to head their football
fortunes, while the University of
ce its new coach in the next few
days.

i

OPEN 10 A.M. MON..SAT., 1 P.M. SUN.

FREE FILMS-MONDAY, Jan. 24
Angell Hall-Auditorium C
Struggle for Southern Arica
7:00 p.m.-FRUIT OF FEAR-Documents and con-
trasts the two societies, the black majority and
ruling white minority, the disparate social and
economic privileges.
8:15 p.m. - ONE NATION - TWO NATIONAL-
ISMS. With documentary footage examines the
Nationalist Party and apartheid policies.
9:30 p.m.-THE HUNTERS-Story of four bush-
men of the Kalahari Desert in Southwest Africa.
COMMANDER CODYS COMING
+.COMMANDER CODY'S COMING
COMMANDER CODY'S COMING
Sun., Jan. 23-Hill Aud.-8 P.M.
tickets available thru Saturday
at Michigan Union
and both Salvation Record Stores
AND AT THE DOOR
PRICES: $2.50, $2, $1.50, $1

Stanford named Jack Christian-
sen, 43, head coach of the San:
Francisco 49ers for five years and!
a Stanford assistant since 1968,
to succeed John Ralston, who step-
ped down recently after two con-'
secutive Pacific-8 championships &l
Rose Bowl victories to become
coach and general manager of the
Denver Broncos of the National'
Football League.
The Stanford job was offered to
Mike White, Ralston's assistants,
but the 35-year old White decli-
ned the post" in favor of yet anot-'
her decision which I have not yet'
made."{
White also has been offered the
head job at California his alma
mater, as well as a spot on Ral-I
ston's staff at Denver-

If White takes the California'
post, he would become the 12th
new coach among the nation's 118
major football playing colleges sin-
ce the end of the 1971 campaign. It
would leave Oregon, where Jerry'
Frei resigned Thursday, as the
only school without a head coach.
Bill Fulcher a 1957 graduate and
a member of the Georgia Tech'
staff from 1963-9, was summoned
from the University of Tampa,
where he compiled a 6-5 record in
one season as head coach, to re-
place Bud Carson, the only coach
Tech has ever fired.
Fulcher who will be 38 next
month, played guard and line-I

t
i

BULLETIN
The University of Califor-
nia's newly appointed athletic
director, Dave Meggard, named
former Stanford assistant Mike
White the Bears' new head
football coach last night.

l
_
E

OPEN HOUSE

PICTURE YOURSELF AS
A PAULIST.
.. 4
picture a re- « <:
ligious Com-
munity. A
Community *
founded by
an Ameri-
can convert
in, and for, the.
benefit of
North Amer-
ica.
Picture a
founder who
was a century
ahead of his
time. A man
with a vision
that came true.
A man with
a belief that
a Community could be modern
and flexible enough to meet the
needs of the Church in every age
as they arise. A Community that
wouldn't lag behind the times on
leaden feet. A Community that
would communicate through the
spoken and printed word and one
that wouldn't be hampered by
specific activities when new needs
arise.
Next, picture the men in this
new Community. They would be
flexible. Each one would use his
own individual talents in his own
way and would be given the free-
dom to do so.
These are the Paulists. The
modern religious Community.
Keeping pace with the times.
Concerned.Involved.
If you can picture yourself as
a Paulist, why not write for more
information to: Rev. Donald C.
Campbell, C.S.P., Vocation Di-
rector, Room No. 400
415 West 59th Street
New York, N. Y. 10019

,
t
f
l
t
«I
T
i S
ii

backer for three years on Geor-
gia Tech teams that went to three
bowl games. He later played for
the Washington Redskins from 1957
to 59.
"This is the fulfillment of a
life's dream," said the Augusta,
Georgia native. "I've been dream-
ing of this day ever since I arrived,
at Georgia Tech in 1952 as a skin-
ny guard.'
Christiansen starred as a defen-
sive back with the Detroit Lions
from 1951-8 before joining the 49ers
as an assistant coach. He is a'
member of the pro football Hall'
of Fame.

t

By GEORGE HASTINGS
The Michigan State swim
team may not exactly seem to
be another Indiana, but Michi-
gan swim coach Gus Stager is
taking nothing for granted
when his swimmers meet the
Spartan team at Matt Mann,
Pool today.
Stager admits that the times
of the MSU swimmers in their
two Big Ten meets in -January,
in which the Spartans have
narrowly defeated Minnesota
and been soundly defeated by
Wisconsin, both of whom the
Wolverines thrashed in Decem-
ber.
However, he insists, MSU has
not yet lived up to its poten-
tial, and if it should come up
with peak performances, the
IWolverines could be in for a
tussle. He points to the usual
intensity of the Michigan-
Michigan State series in any
sport, and says that if the
Spartansnare to improve, it will
probably be for this meet.
While MSU has been busy
this month, swimming three
dual mheets (the other a non-
league win over Iowa State),
the Michigan team has not been
involved in dual competition
since early in January against
Southern Illinois. However,
Stager says his swimmers have
been having some good prac-
tices recently, and he expects
fast times and perhaps even a
few pool records during the
meet.
,The entire, Wolverine team is
in good shape and ready to go,
and as usual it will be led by
the 400-yard medley relay team,
along with individual stars By-
ron MacDonald and Stu Isaac.
The relay squad, consisting of
Isaac, MacDonald, Chris Han-
sen, and Larry Day, has al-
ready turned in the fastest time
in the nation, and should have
little trouble today. Their time
of 3:31.8 was tops in the latest
NCAA listing for this year.
MacDonald, also has an in-
dividual number one in the na-
tion listing in the 200 yard but-
terfly, with a time of 1:54.48.
Michigan is well-stocked in this
event, with Larry Day having
the sixth best time in the coun-
try. Augusto Gonzales the elev-
enth, and Don Peterson the
twelfth. However, MacDonald
has just returned from the Aus-
tralian National Champion -
ships and Gonzales from the

Peru Championships, and nei-
ther may be too well rested.
Isaac, another nationally
highly-ranked swimmer, should
take both the 200-yard individ-
ual medley and the 200 yard
yard breaststroke. In the med-
ley, his 1:59.26 time is number
five, while his 2:11.23 clocking
in the breaststroke is third best
in America. However, his team-
mate in the breaststroke, Mike
Whitaker (fourteenth, nation-
ally), is also just back from the
Australian meet, where he and
MacDonald represented Canada,
and he may not be in top form.
In the long freestyle events,
Stager expects that MSU's John
Thuerer will force Wolverines
Mark Anderson and Dan Fish-
burn to swim their best times
in order for Michigan to win.
Stager also expresses concern
over the backstroke, in which
MSU's Alan Dilley poses a
threat. His times as of yet this
year are not too impressive,
but as Stager says "He always
seems to beat us." However,
Michigan's Chris Hansen, with
the nation's fourth best time,
must be considered the favorite.
The diving competition should
also be close, but the free-style,
sprints should be easy for Mich-
igan's Jose Aranha and Ray
McCullough. However, if Mich-
igan has a safe lead Stager
may experiment with other
swimmers in the sprints.

*

DETROIT PISTON forward Curtis Rowe (18) decides there's no
way to go to the basket, being guarded by Baltimore's Jack Marin
(24) and Stan Love (10) in last night's National Basketball As-
sociation gabe at Cobo Arena in Detroit. The Pistons won the
game 107-102, led by the scoring of All-Star guard Jimmy
Walker who drilled in 37 points.

OUTSIZE OPPONENTS

Ge"' ce Abav to
Pc o a Ona.
bOV a t-
Chec

Baby 11ue
By RANDY PHILLIPS
Michigan's undefeated Fresh-
man cagers will get a well de-
served breather today when they
tackle Wayne State's frosh at
Crisler Arena. The game will be
at 11:45-
Sporting a 6-0 record and com-
ing off a tough come from be-
hind 94-80 win over Detroit last
Saturday, the Wolverines will
host a team that has Just broken
even for the year, 3-3. The Tar-
tans have lost to Detroit as well
as Highland Park and Ohio Nor-
thern. The victories have been
against weaklings Windsor, Shaw
College, and Oakland.
Michigan coach Dick Honig
thinks that "they'll be decent, but
I'm sure we'll, outman them."
The Wolverines will surely
out-height the Tartans as the
tallest probable starter for Wayne
State will be 6-3. The Tartans'
top scorer and rebounder, Tyrone
Henton, will probably be playing
for Wayne State's varsity when
the Tartars tip off against Akron
today. Henton has scored at a
19.6 clip and has pulled in 15.6
rebounds a contest.
The Tartans use a patterned
shuffle offense and a man-to-man
defense, but they will be hope-
lessly outsized inside and may
have to go into a zone defense.
C. J. Kupec at center and
Campy Russell and John Ash-
worth at forwards give Michi-
gan a four to five inch advantage
all along the front line.
Russell had his best day shoot-
ing in last week's victory over
Detroit when he poured in 38
points.

cagers fight Tartans

McKapain has a 15 point av-
erage while forward-center Larry
Fitzpatrick has scored in double
figures all season and has pulled
down 12.7 rebounds a game. Fitz-
patrick will be assigned the task
of covering Kupec.
Kupec has been figuring into
Michigan's offense more in re-
cent games and has added a
steady scoring average to his
steady rebounding and defense.
Last Saturday he put in 15 points
and was fed the ball more at the
high post on a variation off the
Wolverines usual guard through
offense.

That variation moves Kupec
around so that he can get open
both outside and inside. Kupec
has a good shoot from 10-12 feet
out and Honig wants to "get him
into position where he can do
more shooting."
The Wolverine's press has been
very effective all season, and it
was this tactic that broke De-
troit's back. Honig says that it is
the quick, aggressive personnel
on his squad that makes the press
go. It is likely that Michigan will
strategically use the zone press
against the Tartans.

'U.

Matmen grapple with
underdog Hoosiers

I I TV & Stereo Rentals

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January 23 thru 29

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NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
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Corner South U and Washtenaw
Phone 663-3534

AUSTIN
DIAMOND

1209 S. University

663-7151

U

' by BOB BcGINN,
Today in Crisler Arena, after
Campy, Henry and friends have
vacated the spotlight, Michigan's
wrestling squad will take on Ind-
iana. The Wolverines have won
their last four dual meets and
finished an impressive fourth in
the Midlands Tournament and coa-
ch Rick Bay's charges should be
a factor in the Big Ten Champion-
ships in late February.
Indiana enters today's match
with a squad described by Bay
as "not bad." He feels it could be
fairly close and that hiswteam
could be upset if they wrestle
poorly. The Hoosiers of coach Char-
ly McDaniel, who must be a pa-

RIDES

WEST QUAD
MARKLEY
BURSLEY BUS STOP

SUN. 4-8, MON. & TUES. 6:30-7:30

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tient man to have spent 27 years
at Indiana, have defeated Illinois
and Wisconsin in splitting four
Big Ten dual meets.
Michigan's lineup will be missing
a familiar face. Veteran heavy-
weight Rick Bolhouse has left
the team for reasons unknown to
Bay. His absence will definitely
hurt, especially since Bolhouse did
not lose a deciding match in two
years.
The strength of Michigan's team
continues to lie in the lower wei-
ghts. At 118, freshman Jim Brown
(7-2-1) has done a great job and
should be a champion in the future.
Bill Davids (11-2) has been equally
brilliant at 126. He leads the team
in falls with four. Bay needs and
expects two victories here.
At 134 and 142 Rick Neff and
captain Mark Kingwill not start
today. Neff was beaten out by
accomplished senior Jim Hagan
(1-1) in this week's challenge mat-
ches, while King is injured and will
be replactd by freshman Bill
Schuck (3-3). Schuck faces a rug-
ged foe in Bill Willetts, defending
Big Ten champ and the Hoosiers
premier grappler.
Jerry Hubbard (8-2), Mitch Men-
drygal (6-5), and John Ryan (3-3)
will handle the middle weights
for Michigan. Hubbard, only a soph
omore, appears to be even better
than last season when he was Big
Ten champ and placed fourth in
the NCAA Finals. Mendrygal will
meet tough John Willson in what
looks like a tight match.
The Wolvtrines have had trou-
ble breaking even in the upper wei-
ghts all year. Today Bay will
start Dave Curby (4-3) at 177-,
Therlon Harris (5-5) at 190, and
Gary Ernst (3-2-1)-at heavyweight,
Ernst's opponent will be Gary
Donatelli, who finished third in
the Big Ten last winter.

SHEET MUSIC
Constantly Building New Stock
717 North UniversityA

226 W. LIBERTY

663-6474

STRUGGLE FOR
SOUTHERN AFRICA

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PHI DELTA THETA,
a living situation of fun, friends, comfort, and
a wide variety of activities and outlets
IN THE UNION ASSEMBLY HALL, UNION BASEMENT
SUN. JAN. 23rd 2-5 & 7-10

T-Th at 9

Poli. Sci. 351
Lec. Rm.2, Mod. Lang. Bldg.
NO PREREQUISITES

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COLD & HUNGRY?
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