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January 22, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


1

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

Alice's Film Series
KING OF HEARTS
French dialogue/English subtitles
SUNDAY-JAN. 23

Ann Arbor, Michigan

claims

Saturday, January 22, 1972

/

Strife

in Rhodesia

NEW PUBLIC HEALTH BUILDING AUDITORIIJ

- ~ ^ ~ w i

M

A--7 Fir 9 P.M.
i

n esws briefs
by The' Associated Press

claims
victims

eight more

black

NEW ON CAMPUS
SPEED-A-PRINT
619 E. William St. at State
(former Barth Tailor location)

XEROX OFFSET PRINTING
COPIES WHILE YOU WAIT
* EVERYTH ING PRINTED 0 TYPESETTING.
Lee Composition & Printing Co.-761-4922

THE LAST OF NINE U.S. COMBAT DIVISIONS to partici-
pate in six years of Vietnam fighting will leave the war zone in
the next few days.
The units of the 101st Airborne Division, totaling some 2,000
men, will be gone from Vietnam before April 30 under President
Nixon's current pull-out quota of 70,000 by that date.
They will leave behind three of the 101st's battalions.
. ,. *
THE SAILOR WHO SOUGHT SANCTUARY in several Palo
Alto, Calif. churches since Monday in protest against the war,
was taken into custody yesterday and returned to his ship.
Richard Larson of Redland, Mich., surrendered voluntarily to
officials armed with an arrest warrant charging desertion from his
ship, the attack aircraft carrier Midway, docked in San Francisco Bay.
* * *
A FEDERAL JUDGE refused yesterdy to bar the Navy from
landing 900 Marines at Reid State Park in Portland, Maine as
part of the controversial amphibious exercise called "Snowy
Beach."
An ad hoc group had sought an injunction against the exercisej
arguing the park would be ecologically damaged by the landing and
bivouac.
The judge ruled insufficient proof existed that "the quality of
the human environment" would be affected.
* * k
FLORIDA PRISON OFFICIALS announced yesterday "stop-
gap action" to relieve overcrowding and allow the reopening of
the state prison system to new prisoners on Jan. 31.
Corrections Director Louie Wainwright issued orders Tuesday
to refuse to accept any new prisoners into state prisons because,
he had run out of room.
The stop-gap action includes the early release of 241 prisoners
originally scheduled for release within the next two months.
WHITES FLEEING INTEGRATED schools may force public
schools in the Miami area into another round of busing to re-
store racial balances.
The prospect has led to mass rallies by parents, school boy-
cotts, and protests.
The American Civil Liberties Union has asked the Supreme
Court to declare that Dade County does not have a unitary systemj
and to return the case to the local courts.
THE NATION'S GOVERNORS endorsed strongly yesterday £
the federal revenue sharing package authored by Rep. Wilbur
Mills (D-Ark.), all but abandoning the rival proposal being
* pushed by President Nixon.j
The endorsed proposal would give $3.6 billion to local city andf
county governments and $1.8 billion to state governments.1
The Nixon proposal would split about the same amount of:
money on a 50-50 basis.1

SALISBURY, Rhodesia ( -
Police killed eight blacks and
wounded 14 during rioting
Thursday night in an African
sector of Umtali, 135 miles
southeast of Salisbury, the
government reported today.
This brought the death toll to
15, all blacks, since rioting in var-
ious Rhodesian cities began Sun-
day in protest of the proposed in-
dependence agreement between
the British and Rhodesian gov-
ernments. Police killed three oth-
er blacks in Salisbury Wednesday
night.
Prime Minister Ian Smith blam-
ed the outbursts on agitators bent
on "barbaric destruction."
"What greater proof could any-
one have of their lack of matur-
ity, lack of civilization, their in-
ability to make constructive con-
tribution?" Smith said in a na-
tionwide TV and radio address
yesterday.
Meanwhile black were reported-
ly planning a demonstration in
the center of Salisbury for this
morning.
The violence was touched off
by the arrival of a British com-
mission to assess the reaction of
both the white minority and the
black majority to the proposed
agreement. It provides for some
enlargement of blackrepresenta-
tion in parliament, but post-
pones majority rule indefinitely.
In his address Smith said the
trouble was not unexpected and
that there had always been "mi-
nority reaction" when representa-
tives of the British government
visited Rhodesia.
"As we believe this will be the
last time that such a visit will
take place - whichever way the,
decision goes - we have gone out
of our way to meet the British
request to release the maximum
number of detainees for the pur-
pose of their test of acceptability,"
he said.
Rhodesia declared its independ-
ence from Britain in 1965 while
under pressure of Prime Minister
Harold Wilson's government to
give Rhodesia's black majority a
greater say in the government.

Policeman confronts black in Rhodesia

TEN MEMBERS:

Britain and Ireland among 5
new Common Market. nations

BRUSSELS,

Belgium A)

Britain, Ireland, Denmark, and
Norway are signing treaties today
to become members of the Euro-
pean Common Market - the big-
gest trading bloc in history.
The prime ministers of the
candidate countries will attend
ceremonies in Belgium's Egmont
Palace where they will sign a
four-foot pile of documents fol-
lowed by a gala dinner given by
King Baudouin and Queen Fa-
biola.

Other members of the Market
are France, West Germany, Italy,
Holland, and Luxembourg.
Already the 10 countries have
more population than the Soviet
Union or the United States and
carry on more of the world's trade
than both of them combined with
Japan.
Beside s having a large measure
of free trade with one another,
they possess other advantages in-
cluding a widening network of
special trade agreements involv-
ing dozens of countries. A unified
system of tariffs against all the
rest cover the rest of the na-
tions, including the United States.
The Market nations also have
a unified system of subsidizing
farmers and a unified volume of
business law.
Heads of the Common Market
governments will meet in summit
conference later this year to re-

rope. Common defense is part of
the dream.
Some British leaders think this
trading bloc can be transformed
into a foreign policy bloc. Through
it, Britain could regain some of
the influence over international
events it has lost since World
War II.
In entering the Market, Britain
has found a relationship with Eu-
rope. The United States and the
Common Market have not found
a relationship. The United states
wants more help in exporting its
products; the Common Market
wants to promote its own exports.

U.S. JET ATTACKS:
N. Viets rout Laotian forces

Nixon asks Congress for
action to end dock strike

VIENTIANE, Laos ()-Com-
munist forces overran some gov-
ernment positions on a key ridge
overlooking Long Cheng and
hand-to-hand fighting was re-
ported yesterday for control' of
the former U. S. Central Intel-
ligence Agency base in a con-
tinuing two-week conflict.
American military informants
said Laotian troops, who had
pushed an enemy regiment off
most of the ridge top three days
ago, were forced to abandon a
helicopter landing pad in the
counterattack.
It began Thursday night with
a heavy bombardment by North
Vietnamese mortars and artil-

lery followed by an infantry as-
sault against the government-
held bunker complex.
According to one U.S. officer,
American jets were experienc-
ing difficulty in knocking out
the North Vietnamese long
range artillery, which fires on
Long Cheng from the southern
edge of the Plain of Jars. So
far they have been able to de-
stroy only five of the estimated
20 guns:
The battle for Long Cheng, 78
miles north of Vientiane, is said
to involve 5,000 to 8,000 North
Vietnamese regulars and 3,000
government defenders. Thus far,
the conflict has cost eacn side

more than 500 dead.
Meanwhile, in South Vietnam
in the heaviest of a series of at-
tacks, Saigon headquarters re-
ported a barrage of 20 mortar
shells was laid down on a South
Vietnamese armored cavalry po-
sition just south of the demili-
tarized zone between the two
Vietnams. No South Vietnam
ese casualties were reported.
South Vietnamese military
sources reported killing 34 Com-
munist forces and capturing six
others in the series of attacks
across the country. Government
losses were put at five killed and
15 wounded.

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. (P) - -
President Nixon sent emergencyl

COMMANDER CODY and his Lost Planet Airmen will
make their only Detroit area appearance on this tour this
Sunday, Jan. 23 at Hill Auditorium. Tickets on sale now
thru Sat, at Mich. Union noon-6 p.m. and both Salvation
Record Stores. $1-$1.50-$2-$2.50. Also appearing will be
Buddies In The Saddle and The Boogie Brothers (Steve
and John) advertisement

view how far and how fast they j legislation to Congress yesterday
want to move toward the old to force striking West Coast long-
shoremen back to work imme-
dream of a United States of Eu- diately while a federal panel set-
ties the long-festering dock dis-
The Michigan Daily, edited and man- pute through binding arbitration.
aged by students at the University of!Twnyfu pot'erPa -
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second Twenty-four ports were para-
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-j lyzed July 1 when 13,000 members
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, 1 of the International Longshore-
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues- men's and Warehousemen's union
day through Sunday morning Univer-I
sitv ,year. Subscription rates: $10 by (ILWU) walked off their Jobs.
carrier, $11 by mail. Nixon invoked the Taft-Hartley
Summer Session published Tuesday Act in October and the dock
through Saturday morning. Subscrip- workers returned to work, but
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail. they resumed their strike Man-

day - three weeks after the cool-
ing-off injunction expired.
Without listing names, Nixon
blamed ILINU leaders for the
lingering dispute.
ILWU president Harry Bridges
said that "any legislation pro-
posed by the President will not
settle the strike."
But in San Francisco, the Pa-
cific Maritime Association said
through Secretary James Robert-
son that the shippers support any
legislation aimed at resolving the
strike.
"It is still our preference, how-
ever, to negotiate a settlement
across the bargaining table," Ro-
bertson said, urging the ILWU to
resume bargaining today or to-
morrow.

I

WORSHIP

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S BEST FILMS"
-Bella -Tom -Shirley t -John
Abzug O'Horgan Chisholm Simon

I

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years).
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
For transportation call 668-6427.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist
10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist & Sermon
7:00 p.m. Evening Prayer (chapel)
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Preaching: Mr. Waser

FIRST UNITED
CHURCH AND
FOUNDATION

METHODIST
WESLEY

State at Huron and Washington
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover
Rupert: THE DANGER OF SLEEPING IN
CHURCH.
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00 to noon.
Sunday, January 23:
5:30 p.m. Celebration and Supper inte-
grated as part of program, "Sharing of
Feelings and Concerns," Pine Room
Monday, January 24:
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion, "Chris-
tian Faith and the Inner Life", Pine Room.
Lunch 25c. Out in time for 1 p.m. classes.
Leader: Ed McCracken.
Wednesday, January 26:
12,-00 noon-Luncheon Discussion, "Po-
litical Consciousness as a Christian." Pine
Room. Lunch 25c. Out in time for 1 p.m.
Thursday, January 27:
12 noon-Luncheon Discussion, "The Life
of Jesus in HumanEncounter," Pine Room.
classes. Leader, Bart Beavin.
Lunch 25c Out in time for 1 p~rm. classes.
Leader, Bart Beavin
6:00 p.m.-Grad Community. Discussion
on Bangla Desh.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave:
Alfred T. Scheips; Pastor
Sunday services at 9:15 and 10:30
Wednesday service at 10:00 p.m.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
AND CENTER
801 South Forest at Hill
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m.-Matins
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion
6:00 p.m.-Supper
7:00 p.m.-Program
WEDNESDAY
5:15 p.m. Eucharist
CANTERBURY HOUSE
at 330 Maynard St.
(The Alley/The Conspiracy)

I

I

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149

Canterbury House, meeting at 330 Maynard
Street (The Alley/The Conspiracy) 11:00
a.m. The Eucharist. Hard thinking. Thanks-

11

. i

U bunda

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