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April 20, 1972 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-20

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, April 20, 1972

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, April 20, 1972

Viewi
By JOHN MARSTON
There is more art in Ann Ar-
bor than people know about.
Once you've wandered through
the art museum and the exhibits
listed in the Record, there is
still a great deal of interesting
art to contemplate in galleries
that support themselves by
selling what they show.
The newest gallery in Ann
Arbor is the University Activi-
ties Center Art Gallery in the
Michigan Union. It has an at-
mosphere of determined confu-
sion. Not all the art is that
good, but there are a surpris-
ing number of very striking
pieces, and there's so much art,
in so many different forms and
styles, .that it gives the exciting
feeling that you might discover
something by accident.
The gallery started be-
cause the professional galleries
didn't want student art. Even if
it was good, they felt it repre-
sented too experimental a stage
in the artist's development.
They wanted art that reflected
a body of work, and the stu-
dent, in rtrying various media
while developing a style, is not
that consistent yet.

ng the
Anybody can submit art to
the. UAC gallery, although stu-
dent work has some preference.
There are three different review
panels and work rejected by one
panel may be resubmitted to the
other two. Al: the people who
work at the gallery are volun-
teers, except for the director
Don Mattson, an energetic man
who adds to the atmosphere of
constant activity.
Any kind of artistic endeavor
fits into the gallery. They have
had workshops, craft demon-
strations and poetry. I recently
saw a girl wandering around
looking for a quilting bee. Matt-
son was preparing for the spe-
cial "cildren's art exhibit," and
showed me some of the work,
"It's very up to date. That's
what the modern artists are do-
ing. They're just learning how
to be children." The pleasure of
the gallery is in its unrestricted
creative effort.
On Mrs. Forsythe's desk there
is an abstraction in a glass box,
which, a note explains, was
created when her grandson
dropped his model car on the
stove. Mrs. Forsythe own's the
Forsythe Gallery, upstairs above

art galleries

NIGHTLY A
7:00-9:15 -._.

MATINEES
Wed., Sat., Sun..
1:00,3:15

the Post Office in Nickels Ar-
cade, the oldest gallery in Ann
Arbor.
There is a certain conserva-
tive quality about the gallery,
although it is true, as Mrs. For-
sythe emphasizes, that works
vary from "the realistic to the
non-objective". The gallery has
more variety in media, than
most private galleries in town:
photography, ceramics and
sculpture, as well as painting
and prints. Nevertheless, with
the possible exception of the
model car, I didn't see any-
thing there that would have
been called daring, and prob-
ably wouldn't have considered
that a virtue anyway. Mrs. For-
sythe stressed that the gallery
was "very much interested in
draftsmanship and craftsman-
ship" as well as creativity. A.
child can make a good work of
art, she said, but it's an acci-
dent. Art shown must be good,
substantial pieces by profession-
al, artists.
She rejects the idea of art
created for the moment, or stan-
dards of art which may not
prove durable. "We haven't

jumped from one fad to an-
other," she said, giving as ex-
amples of fads pop, op, and
hardedge art.
The gallery does a lot of work
decorating offices and banks,
besides its private sales, Mrs.
Forsythe said. She also said
that she wanted students and
people who just want to look to
feel free to come to the gallery.
Further downtown is the Pyr-
amid Gallery, younger and less
comfortably established. It is a
rather sparse gallery, with a
large hardwood floor and white
walls. It becomes more relaxed
because people at the gallery
are quick to talk to you, offer
to discuss the paintings with
you, and begin calling you by
your first name.
They are very antagonistic
toward any elitism in art. "Art
is fun; it should be enjoyed by
just people", the director Marty
Nyrkkanan said. The gallery
would like to reach people be-
yond the small percentage who
have traditionally bought art.
A large part of the gallery's
business comes from what they
call the Gallery Exchange Pro-
See VIEWING, Page '7

They used every passion in their incredible duel!

0

Vanessa Redgrave "GendaJaCkSOnf(PG)
PatckMcGoohan' TimothyDalton 'NigelDavenport
i.
Trevor
C.tmng Howard"Daniel Massey Ian Holm
NO 5 O'CLOCK SHOW WED., SAT., SUN.

Creating your own television

Daily Classifieds
Bring Resu lts

1

cZNZ A xx

"We want people to realize
that TV is important in this
culture. TV is a tool that is con-
trolled by a few and we want to
decentralize ' the media."
Allen Rucker, member of mul-
ti-media and environmental
collective called Ant Farm, has
come from San Francisco to dis-
play and instruct people in the
use of the upcoming tool tode-
centralize the media -- video
tape.
"Video is the TV tool. Even a
four-year-old can operate the

certs, make correspondence
tapes, explore the possibilities of
video art, or make informational
tapes," said Rucker.
Rucker will appeat at a sym-
posium to be held at the Con-
spiracy tonight.
Also here for the week-long
workshop is Michael Shamberg,
author of Guerilla Television,
and member of Raindance Corp.
promoters of a "grass roots TV."
"The FCC has ruled that ev-
ery cable TV line must have one
.- nn r>t" C o "2r . Vi

Arbor will have one and any-
body can show their own tele-
vision programs on a first come
first served basis," said Sham-
berg.
Video tape has many advan-
tages over regular film. A video,
tape machine can play back in-
stantly or be retained for any
length of time. The sound track
matches perfectly. Tape costs
only about $12 for 30 minutes
while film would cost $120.
"Video can also capture people
as they really are," says Rucker.
" ~rr r' " ongt film must

be premeditated, but with video
you can just tape over if some
comes out wrong."
A n o t h e r advantage says
Shamberg is "that with a $50
adapter you can play a video
tape through any television set."
Tonight at the Conspiracy,
there will be a demonstration of
video taping and tapes. "We will
put the equipment in the hands
of the people who come and let
themrshoot each other," said
Rucker,
They may also tape the reac-
tions of people to their own
tapes "before they become too
self conscious," adds Shamberg.
"I can see the day when peo-
ple will be making tapes instead
of writing a final thesis or
books. Tapes are being made by
the Black Panthers, and the
Young Lords in New York and
getting on television. It's gonna
happen everywhere soon."

aud. a, angell hall

75c

shows at 7 & 9

TICKETS ON SALE AT 6 P.M.

I

END OF CLASSES MOVIE
WEEKEND EXTRAVAGANZA.1

OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT
1 p.m., 4:30, 8 p.m.
Mon.-Sat. $1.50 until 4:30
Mon.-Thurs. eve. $2.00
Fri. and Sat. eve. $2.50
All Day Sunday $2.50
603 E. Liberty
DIAL 665-6290

Friday MEDIUM COOL
(1969, Haskell Wexier)
Saturday- McLuhan & politics rneet at the '68 Chicago convention, the
final scene is a classic.

Sunday-

PRETTY POISON
(1969, Noel Black)
A high school cheerleader joins a mentally-ill arsonist to sabotage
a Mass. lumber mill for the CIA. A great film. Anthony Perkins,
Tuesday Weld.

1

A diagram of a video tape unit reprinted from Guerilla Television by permission of author, Michael
Shamberg.

COME AND GET IT
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Thurs.-Kodai Road
Fri.-New Heavenly Blue
People's Plaza 12-1
CH ASTITY'S COMING 4122
SHOP TONIGHT UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
FRIDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 9:00 P.M.

A

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April 22
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FRIDAY, MAY 8th, 8:30 P.M.
MASONIC AUDITORIUM--DETROIT
PETE SEEGER SINGS
Tickets: $5.00, $4.O, $3.00, $2.00
Available at Masonic Temple Box Office and J. L.
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Box Office only).
AUSPICES: AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION

I

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HEAR
Prof. PolyKarp Kusch
of Columbia University, 1955 Nobel Prize winner
in Physics, distinguished educator
SPEAK ON
"THE AGONY OF SCIENCE
IN THE UNIVERSITY"

TONIGHT,
8:30 p.m.
April 20th

Auditorium 3
Modern Languages
Building

f

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ALL ARE INVITED!'

..I

THE BEACH BOYS
at Central Michigan University
MT. PLEASANT, MICH.

Miss J travels on with a
canvas bag under lock and key
It's the smart way to go in
rugged canvas with a
double-zipped main compartment
and side zipped pockets.
16x12" in navy, red. natural

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