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January 21, 1972 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-21

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Friday, January 21, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Friday, January 21, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

State Senate OK's

provision

to

restrict billboard location, size-

LANSING, Mich. VP)- A bill only in conimercial or industrially
that would legally chop down zoned areas. That would force
thousands of billboards in the tearing down of billboards in

state has passed the Senate.
By a 28-11 vote yesterday, the
Senate passed with minor amend-
ments a House measure that couldj
clamp tight restrictions on out-
door advertising along federal or,
federally-supported state high-
ways.
the billboard industry estimates
that five per cent to 85 per cent of
the structures in Michigan would
be illegal under the act, says Sen.
James Fleming (R-Jackson),'
prime Senate sponsor of the bill.
The bill stipulates that outdoor,
advertising within a two-mile lim-
it of a city or village be erected

strictly residential areas, for ex-
ample.
Billboards outside the two-mile
limit would be allowed only where
businesses operate continuously
along an 800-foot-long stretch of
highway. A small restaurant could
erect an advertising sign on its
own property, but could not put
one up down the road unless other
businesses were in operation there.
The bill would require billboards
to display a clearly-visible permit
from the State Highway Depart-
ment. The Highway Commission
would be allowed to lease land for
billboards only if the advertised

premises are within five miles of
the billboard.
The billboard bill also strictly
regulates the size, lighting and
spacing of outdoor advertising.
In counties of over 425,000 pop-
ulation, signs could not exceed
6.500 square feet. Signs in counties
below that population could be no
larger than 1,200 square feet.
Signs with changing illumina-
tion could only be erected in cities
or villages over 35,000 in popula-
tion. Any sign that "obscures or
interferes with the effectiveness of
an official traffic sign, device or
signal" would not be allowed.
The state would have control
of billboards as far as 660 feet

away from a federally-supported
highway in urban areas and 3,000
feet away from a highway in rural
places.
Under the act. a sign in a busi-
ness area or commercial or in-
dustrial area could not be less
than 500 feet from another bill-
board on the same side of the
highway. Billboards would have to
be at least 100 feet apart in cities
or villages.
With a nod to rugged terrain
in the Upper Peninsula, the Sen-
ate adopted an amendment al-
lowing signs to be erected across
the highway from the businesses
they advertise in rural areas. Pre-
viously, the bill stipulated that
signs must be on the same side of
the highway. but this would be
impractical along rock-bound or
forrested portions of the UP, ac-
cording to Fleming.
Each violation of the act would
carry penalties from $100 to
$1,000. In addition, the billboard
owner would have to pay the state
if state officials remove the struc-
ture.
Fleming noted the bill complies
with provisions of the federal
Highway Beautification Act. There
has been some concern that Mich-
igan could lose millions of dollars
in federal highway funds if a bill-
board law isn't passed by the be-
ginning of the next fiscal year in
July.

III

REFUGEE RELIEF FUND:
Money sought from students,
community to aid Bengladesh

! i

I

By JANET GORDON
In an effort to raise funds for
needy Bengali refugees, a local
coalition will ask students and
community members to sacrifice
dinner on Febraury 16 and donate
the cost of the meal to aid Ban-
gladesh.
A spokesman for the group
sponsoring the fast, the Refu-
gee Relief Fund. said, "The idea
is not just to raise funds but to
make people in their bodies
what it is not to eat. That is
what the people of Bangladesh
have been feeling for nine
months."
The coalition includes staff
from the International Center

and the Office of Religious Affa-
irs, and has the cooperation of
Student Government Council.
The relief fund staff will urge
students living in dormitories to
sign up for the fast from tables
set up outside dorm cafeterias.
University housing will then do-
nate a certain sum for each
student listed. It is hoped that
as much as $3,000 can be raised
in this way.
Community members are be-
ing asked to send contributions
to the Ecumenical Campus Cen-
ter.
Funds to be used for food,
clothing, medicalusupplies and
shelter, will then be channeled
through the offices of Church

Student advocacy unit
organized, seeks funds

World and Catholic Relief Ser-
vices in India and Bangladesh.
According to one spokesman,
Christine Murray, these services
are direct enough so that money
will not get lost in the bureau-
cracy.
Although some fasts have been
held for Bangladesh previously,
fast organizers say none have
been planned to include as many
constituencies as the one set for
next month. Students, commu-
nity members and church groups
are all being asked to participate.
SGC President Rebecca Sch-
enk, Ann Arbor Mayor Robert
Harris, LawSchool Dean Theo-
dore St. Antoine, and Rev. Her-
bert Gebhart, director of the
Washtenaw Council of Churches,
are among those on the spon-
soring committee for the fast.
That committee, according to
Schenk, will be involved in plan-
ning events surrounding the fast
and members will also try o use
their influence to encourage
other organizations to endorse it.
Rev. Paul Dotson, director cf
the International Center. discus-
sed the purpose of the fast.
"First, we want to acquaint the
larger University community
with the tragedy and the desper-
ate human need of the people of
Bangladesh. The ,fast will hope-
fully not only raise funds, but
will enable measure of symbo-
lic identification with their suffer-
ing."
Another spokesman emphasized
that it would be desirable if those
fasting got together on that eve-
ning to talk about the situation
or read Bengali literature.

(Continued from Page 1)
according to spokesmen. with
the belief that although students
have had some impact upon
society in the past, they have
not been able to bring about
many changes because of the
short duration of their efforts.
PIRGIM plans to operate on
a more permanent basis with one
effort in this direction being the
hiring of the professional staff
that will be abel to work un-
interrupted by student vacations,
classes or exams.
Women ask
4
HEW study
(Continued from Page 1)
"Even though it's not strictly
HEW's fault, she said, "HEW is
certainly complicit in the con-
flicts of interest."
HEW officials were unavail-
able for comment on WEAL'S
charges.
HEW recently came under fire
when it was assailed for wide-
spread sex discrimination in em-
ployment. A study prepared by
A HEW's Women's Action Program
revealed that women hold only
14 per cent of its top posts, al-
though they comprise 63 per cent
of its total work force.
Although Gates was hopeful
that the Congressional investiga-
tion would materialize, she was
not optimistic. "We haven't got-
ten many replies from Congress
yet," she said. "Nobody seems to
want to bother."
The lack of reply, however,
may be caused by Congress' re-
cess. Many members of Congress
have not yet returned to Wash-
4 ington.

One major problem faced by
all student groups is varying
degrees of student interest, Lew-
in says. He says, "Students are
in the mood" for this kind of
organization and cites evidence
to support his contention.
More than 30,000 students in
Oregon and nearly 50,000 stu-
dents in Minnesota have success-
fully petitioned for funds, ac-
cording to Lewin, received auth-
orization, set up the Oregon Stu-
dent Interest Research Group
(OSIRG) and the Minnesota Pub-
lic Interest Research Group
MPIRG and successfully prose-
cuted cases.

CREATIVE
SHABBAT
SERVICE
Every Friday-6:1 5 p.m
H I LLEL-1429 Hill
TV & Stereo Rentals
$10.00 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671
U of M Students,
Faculty and Staff
WINTER: LOVE IT
OR LEAVE IT
BAHAMAS-
Freeport
8 DAYS 7 NIGHTS
March 5 to 12
$159.00
HAWAII-
Waikiki Beach
8 DAYS 7 NIGHTS
March 4 to 11
$269.00
ALL TRIPS INCLUDE:
" Round trip non-stop jet
transportation
" Open bar and meal
service en route
" Accommodations for
seven (7) nights at:
Freeport: Freeport Inn
Hawaii: Hale Maki
For Details Call:
Owen Perlman-663-2044
Larry Kaufman-764-7692
Steven Eder-763-2790
or
Steven Zacks-Studentours
483-4850

Ii

MAOR Theater Presents
The Reading of the Play "Cain"
by John Nemerov
Followed by a discussion by Mr. Yaacov Orland,
Israeli playwright, producer, and director, on "Israeli
Theater."
Sat., Jan. 22, 8 p.m. at HILLEL, 1429 Hill
-Admission Free-
If you've received a

I

CUE

SURVEY

and haven't heard from anybody
RETURN your completed SURVEY
to the drop box in
ROOM 112, BASEMENT LAW LIBRARY
(2nd doorway on the right)

by MONDAY, JAN. 24
B., 763-2176 -thanx, CUE people

or call Alan

This Friday, January 21
Rabbi James Gordon
"A JEWISH RESPONSE
TO THE
JESUS PEOPLE"
8 p.m. at Hille-1429 Hill

i

MISS LONELY HEARTS?
Your evenings are empty and boring. You are clumsy in class and
in the office. You need grooming. Your boss is threatening to let

I

I

SEVEN
DAYS

SKI

you go.
Get help quick, Miss Lonely Hearts. Use those lonely nights to im-
prove your basic skills in Typing, Speedwriting, Dictation, and

Lake Tahoe

I

11

I

i

I

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