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April 18, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-18

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, April -1-8,,1972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, April 18, 1972

LSA student government may
receive funding from Regents

DormshaveDAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

By PAUL RUSKIN;
After two years of depending onj
discretionary funding by the LSA
Dean, the LSA student govern-
ment finally has an opportunity to
attain financial autonomy, if the
Regents decide to allocate the
money.
A referendum which was passed
last fall by LSA students gives
the council the right to collect50
cents a semester from all LSA stu-
dents. However, these funds,
which will come out of tuition,
will become available only if a
tuition increase of half a dollar is
approved or present tuition funds
are reallocated.
Since University officials say
that it is very likely that tuition
will be increased, LSA council is
currently faced with the pleasant
problem of deciding how to util-
ize its new-found wealth. LSA
president Diane Rapaport has dis-
cussed a number of programs

son between minority groups and
the University administration. The
council would fulfill this function
by "finding out from various mi-
nority groups what their curricu-
lum, counseling, and other needs
are." Then, the council would "act
as a lobbying group to pressure
the administration into meeting
these needs.
Rapaport, who, is a member of
the Program for Educational and
Social Change (PESO), believes
that the council should support
groups such as PESC which are
attempting to implement educa-
tional reforms. In line with this
view, she proposes that the coun-
cil publish a manual similar to the
Disorientation Manual which was
published last summer by the'
Committee on the Undergraduate
Experience (CUE), an ad-hock
group formed by the LSA Execu-
tive Committee. Last year's man-
ual was designed to teach fresh-

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which she would like to see im- men "how to beat the bureauc-
plemented if the council receives racy" according to committee
the extra money. member Ron Alpern, '74.
One of Rapaport's hopes is that Two other plans for next year
LSA council will be able to revive are for a speakers' series spon-
some of the research that until sored by the council and for a bi-
last August was done by the Cen- monthly council newsletter, which
ter for Research on Conflict Reso- would hopefully end the wide-
lution. This center studied areas spread ignorance of council activ-
of international conflict and tried ities on campus.
to find solutions to world prob- Other LSA council plans for fu-
lems. -

ence on these decision-making
bodies.
One of the major goals of many
council members in this regard is
to obtain student-faculty parity on
the LSA Administration Board,
which currently has no voting stu-
dent members. This board is re-
sponsible for four major areas of
student life - the counseling pro-
gram, granting students exemp-
tions to academic rules, counsel-
ing people whose gradepoint has
fallen below 2.0, and acting as a
judge in cases of academic dishon-
esty.
An ad hoc committee of the Ad-
ministration Board composed of
four faculty and five students re-
cently suggested that students be
granted parity on the board. How-
ever, this proposal still has to be
accepted by the Governing Fac-
ulty, a body composed of all LSA!
faculty members.
A second goal of many LSA
council members is to bring about
a radical change in the grading
system. Three different systems
have been or are being developed
by various LSA committees - the
Curriculum committee, the Stu-
dent-Faculty policy committee.
and CUE. Since the final decision
on which, if any, of these systems
will be adopted is in the hands of
the Governing Faculty, the LSA
council now has little further say
in the matter.
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new classes
(Continued from Page 3)
would function in the Mosher-
Jordan program.
A second group of teaching
fellows would aid students who
are interested in establishing
community service or volunteer
work programs. In addition, theyI
would hold seminars in which
participants in the service proj-
ects would discuss their particu-
lar projects and exchange in-
formation about resources.
The last group of teaching fel-
lows would teach intensive,
eight credit courses in foreign)
languages including French,
German and Spanish. Students+
would be able to fulfill the LSAs
foreign language requirement by
taking two semesters of this
course.
A Mosher-Jordan program al-
ready in effect is the student
counseling office, which was
started at the beginning of the
winter term to decentralize
counseling and to provide resi-
dents with an easily adcessible
source of information. The
counseling office is manned by
20-30 Mosher-Jordan residents
who each work one hour a week.
In addition, other people have
agreed to counsel students who
have questions about specific
subjects.
If you use
tampons,
you already know
how to use
the intermal
deodorant::.
Norforms.

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYP2WRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
TUESDAY, APRIL 18
Day Calendar

tion;sstop in room 3516 S.A.B. anytime
Thurs.
Teacher Corps/Peace Corps will hold
a meeting May 2 to inform interested
students about 2 teacher education
programs; one is Teacher Corps only,
and leads to a B.A.vCandidates for this
program must have completed 80-90
undergrad hrs. be able to demonstrate
sincere interest in inner city pupils;
the other program combines the two
programs, and needs either BA people
with about 40 hrs. in Engl., or people
in elem. educ with minimum of 12
hrs. Engl., or BA with minimum of 12
hrs. educ. Call 764-7460 to sign up.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 RA

Music School: Trumpet Student Re- "IT I
cital, Sch, of Mus. Recital Hall, 12:30 INTERVIEW :
pm. Good Humor Corp. Detroit, Michigan.
LSA Coffee Hour: 2549 LSA Bldg., 3 Will interview Fri.. Apr. 21, 9-5; Return
pm. visit - your last opportunity for big
money this summer for the Detroit
Physics Seminar: G. Thomas, Univ. suburb area. Register for interview
of Rochester, "The Resistive Transition 763-4117.
of Superconductor: Burbles," 2046 Ran-
dall Lab, 3 pm.
Physics Seminar: M. Jacob, Nat'l Ac- Organization Notices
celerator Lab, "Correlations in Particle
Production," P&A Colloq. Rm., 4 pm. L.S.A. Student Government Execu-
Music School: M. Kruzas, clarinet, I tive Council, open meeting, April 19,
Sch. of Mus. Recital Hall, 8 pm. 7:30 PM, 1528 SAB.
Residential College Singers: Res. Coil. 7:00 PM 3M Michigan Union.
Aud., 8 pm. ...Ann Arbor Tenants Union, April 20,
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT Bike-A-Thon, April 23, 1:30 - 5:30
3200 S.A.B. PM, starting at Farmers Market. For In-
PEACE CORPS will be on campus formation, call 761-3186 or 764-4410.
Thurs. to talk to interested people Sponsored by Enact, Ecology Center,
about opportunities in their organiza- - Ann Arbor Bicycle League.

For Info & Forms Contact
662-566

211 Mich. Th. BIdj.
(above Marilyn Shop)
527 E. Liberty

STUDENTS ABROAD

Students and University Community
Summer Study/Travel Abroad
EARN UP TO 12 HOURS CREDIT
GRAD STUDENTS-SPECIAL INTENSIVE LANGUAGE COURSES
" LONDON 0 PARIS SPAIN
. VIENNA * ISRAEL 0 ITALY
FILM, THEATRE, LANGUAGE, ART, and More
Special Scholarships Available
U-M PROFS PROGRAM DIRECTORS
FROM $790 - INCLUDES: Round Trip Air, Inter-Continental
Connections, Tuition, Fees, Room, Board, Insurance, Special Ex-
cursions.

NEW
PENGUINS
AT YOUR

1

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trnQ atin rvole rounah iac

Rapaport suggests that the LEA AurtA. O.'fl',,*tVUjSvt' LUU&1U JSA*a-
councilaposor rkstshopshLnAthat the council appoints the stu-
council sponsor workshops on Identmmest l S tdn-
world peace next fall in an at dnt members to all LSA student-
temrtd cont e seafaculty committeesiand conse-
peaceful solutions to world prob- __hsoeidrt_ -
lems. Furthermore, she says that
it is probable that the University:
will offer seminars on peace as a SUMMER SUBLET
part of the Political Science 499;
course. As a final effort to salvage 2 Bdrm. Furnished
part of the center's program, Rap-
aport mentioned the possibility * Church Street near Hill
that the center's publication, the 0 Air Conditioned
Journal for Conflict Research, * $130 Available May 15
could be kept in print.
Another of Rapaport's ideas is ' 763-6039 Evenings
that the LSA council act as a lia- _
FRIDAY, MAY
MASONIC AUDIT
PETE SEE(
_ i Tickets: $5.00, $
Available at Masonic Te
Hudson Stores ($1.00 st
Box Office only).
AUSPICES: AMERICAN
Folletts bookstore does so RACKHAM
GOVER
much more for me"-.

.
-
_
-
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f
t
i

CAMPUS
BOOKSTOR

'1

THE
GOOD
PEOPLE:
(This partial listing of the
Harvard Summer School
faculty, 1972 session, indi-
cates the calibre of teachers
in the program and the
range of fields from which
they are drawn.)
George W. Albee
Psychology, University of
Vermont
Negussie Ayele
Political Science, Haile Selassie
University
Bethany Beardslee
Soprano
Wilson B. Bishai
Arabic, Harvard
Haskell M. Block
Comparative Literature.
City University of New York
H. B'ochier
Economics, Sorbonne
Jean Bruneau
Comparative Literature, Harvard
R. H. Chapman
English, Harvard
Marshall Cohen
Philosophy, City University
of New York
Maurice Cranston
Political Science.
London School of Economics
Robert Creeley
English, State University of
New York at Buffalo
Dante Della Terza
Romance Languages, Harvard
Jacques Dofny
Sociology, University of
Montreal
Hormoz Farhat
Music, Universty of Tehran
Donald A. Gibbs
Chinese, Harvard
Owen Gintgench
Astronomy, Harvard
Amos Vogel
Film
THE
GOOD
BOOK:

ELEC
TUESDAY-FR ID
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BAMN. Edited by Peter Stansill and David Zane Mairowitz.
A lively, one-of-a-kind anthology of writings from the inter-
national underground, including the Black Panthers,
Yippies, English Situationists, Women's Lib, the "Provos"
of Amsterdam, and more. $2.95
THE SIBERIANS. Farley Mowat. A myth-shattering, first-
hand look at today's Siberia and its people. $1.45
HER-BAK. Volume I: The Living Face of Ancient Egypt.
Isha Schwaller de Lubicz. This new addition to The Pen-
guin Metaphysical Library re-creates the spiritual life of
ancient Egypt in the story of a young man's training in the
Outer Temple. $3.95
SELF-LOVE. David Cole Gordon. Frankness and tolerance
characterize this discussion of the origins, practice, and
effects of masturbation. $1.00C
OVERCOMING THE FEAR OF DEATH. David Cole Gordon.
A forthright look at man's fear of death-drawing on psy-
chological insights of both East and Wlest, and setting forth
the author's positive philosophy of death as the ultimate
unification experience. $1.00
JUSTICE DENIED. The Case for Reform of the Courts.
Leonard Downie, Jr. An informed, thoroughly documented
indictment of the American court system. $1.45
Your campus bookstore carries scores of other
Important Penguins, including recently released
titles in The Penguin Metaphysical Library series.

=MW MAIL TODAY FOR FREE BROCHURE E
Or see your Travel Agent
e Please send me your free 1972-73 Russian Festival Tours brochure.
* Name
NeAddress .-
City_
State-- - Zip
Mail to: American Travel Association, 1000 Vermont Ave., N.W.,
Washington, D. c. 20005

*1

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