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April 18, 1972 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-18

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

U of M PHOTO SERVICES
0 PHOTOGRAPHY-PRINTS

0

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, April. 18, 1972

* OZALI DS-PHOTOSTAT
H
* PHOTO SUPPLIES

-S
. 764-9216

Rm. 540 L.S.A. Bldg.

I!1

NEED RESEARCH AND
REFERENCE WORK DONE?
CHECK OUR LIBRARY
TERMPAPERS UNLIMITED
5744 Woodward Ave., Detroit
CALL-(313) 874-0770

n ews b,,rie fs
by The Associated Press
THE URUGUAYAN "INTERNAL WAR" against the leftist
Tupamaro guerrillas continued yesterday as nine persons, includ-
ing an army captain, were reported killed in a predawn gun
battle around a district office of the Communist party.
The victims, other than the army officer, apparently were sus-
pected Tupamaros who sought refuge in the Communist party build-
ing and from party militants standing vigil in the headquarters to
defend it from right-wing extremists.
Newspapers and radio stations in Uruguay were barred from dis-
tributing accounts of the fight because of censorship imposed in
the declaration of a 30-day anti-guerrilla war approved Saturday
by Congress.
The measure was voted after Tupamaros killed a former gov-
ernment official and three security mn in daylight ambushes Friday.

Are You Interested
In Consumer Problems?
We need volunteer help this
summer at the
Consumer ACTION Center
LSA CREDIT AVAILABLE
Call Harry for information at 769-0236

Apollo 16
moon trip
Continues
Space Center, Houston (M -
Apollo 16 continued on its way
to the moon yesterday, with
only a minor problem marring
the mission.
Engineers said the problem, a
substance peeling off the Apollo
16 lunar lander, appeared to be
bad paint. However, they said it
was, unneeded for Thursday's
moon landing.
Astronauts John Young and
Charles Duke Jr. were directed to
make general inspection of their
moon machine, Orion, last night
to make certain it remained fit
and Thomas Mattingly II was or-
dered by the flight plan to stay
aboard the command ship, Cas-
per.
A spokesman for Grumman
Corp. which built Orion, said the
.001-inch thick coating of white
Ssiliconepaint was designed to pro-
tect the moon machine from the
heat of the sun during its three
days on the moon.
The paint was needed, he said,
only if the launch of Apollo 16
had been delayed a day, causing
the sun to be higher and hotter
at the mountain plateau landing
site when Orion touched down.
But, the launching Sunday was
right on schedule.
Young said there were "a lot of
these little square rectangular
strips up to two inches long" flak-
ing away.

* * *
BERNADETTE DEVLIN, a member of British Parliament,
was ordered to jail yesterday for taking part in an illegal parade
held in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, two months ago.

-Associated Press

Hoffa testifies

Jimmy Hoffa, former head of the tea
tentiarv at Lewisberg Pa .gives testin

amsters' union and recently paroled from the federal peni-
mony yesterday at a House Judiciary Committee hearing in
cedures under consideration.

4G143Qj'd4 G~S UL , 1., Y 6 41
Devlin and Frank McManus, another British legislator, were Washington. The group has parole pros
sentenced to six months in jail each for joining a February march - -- - ---------
to protest the killing of 13 civilians by British troops il London- E E NT CLASSES:
derry on Jan. 30. REIEN LASS

NOW

I

The Last Grad Coffee Hour
of the semester

Meanwhile, hundreds of 'teen-agers fought British forces in a
battle that raged most of the day in the Catholic Divis Street dis-.
trict of Belfast. Two guerrilla snipers were killed and a nine-year-
old boy playing near the scene was wounded in the stomach.
DR. ADELE SIMMONS, was appointed Sunday as dean of
student affairs at Princeton University.
It is the highest post ever held by a woman at Princeton. Sim-
mons, who takes her new office Sept. 1, emphasized that she viewed
herself "as someone dealing with all students, not just women stu-
dents." She describes herself as "very active in woman's liberation."
She is.presently dean of Jackson College at Tufts University
and an assistant professor in the Tufts history department.;
* * .*
THE SUPREME COURT yesterday agreed to decide whether
the states may go beyond federal authorities in guarding their
water against pollution.
Next term the Justices will hear an appeal by Florida designed
to save a state law that imposed full liability on shippers for oil
spills. The federal law on the same subject is not that tough.
The Florida law requires shippers to pay clean up costs regard-
less of whether the oil spill was their fault. Under the federal Water
Quality Improvements Act of the same year a shipper must pay
only in cases of willful negligence or willful misconduct.
By agreeing Monday to hear the Florida case the court indicated
it may decide states are not compelled to defer to federal authorities
in all pollution matters.

ARAB
N OU

Could Be A Beginning
For You
Come On
WED., APRIL 19
8-10 P.M.
4th Floor Rackham

Dorms experiment with new
ideas in education, counseling

I

By PAUL RUSKIN
Following the lead of the Res-
idential College and the Pilot
Program, residents of two other
University dorms, Couzens and
Mosher-Jordan, have recently
attempted to institute similar
innovative counseling and edu-
cational programs.
Couzens offers students a
chance to take any of eight
slightly non-conventional cours-
es for academic credit. Taught
by University teaching fellows,
the Couzens' courses were se-
lected by dorm residents from a
larger group of courses suggested
by interested grad-students.
Four of the Couzens courses
-Images of Women, The Amer-
ican System of Criminal Jus-
tice, Alternatives to the Welfare
System, and a course designed to
allow students to work in a half-
way house for retarded people
and then to discuss their ex-
periences - have been especial-
ly popular with participants.

The welfare system course is
studying the inadequacies of the
present welfare system, which
is, according to course organizer
Gary Ulrich, "a demeaning sys-
tem that prevents many poor
people from receiving benefits.'
During the second half of the
course, students examine various
income maintenance proposals,
then develop their own plan for
an effective welfare system.
In the Images of Women
course, students study the role
of women in contemporary fic-
tion. Participants in the course
are also tracing the development
of that role from classical to
modern literature.
Mosher-Jordan is trying to
get literary college support for
a three-pronged program which
proposes to bring teaching fel-
lows into the dorm to carry out
various functions.
According to the proposal, one
group of teaching fellows would
serve as resource people for stu-

Banker's testimony
-0tF C £21fEA

dents who wish to develop an in-
dependent study program. They
would be responsible for ascer-,
taining which University profes-
sors and TF's are willing to
work with independent study
and how interested teachers
See DORMS, Page 8

LEMONADE AND COOKIES FOR ALL

i
I

g Uien OriJf
WASHINGTON UP) - A New
York investment banker testified
yesterday he started his study of
billion-dollar divestitures of In-
ternational Telephone & Tele-
graph Corp. (ITT) subsidiaries by
reading an ITT director's analysis
supplied by the White House.
The study written by Richard
Ramsden has been named by Jus-
tice Department officials as a
principal reason for the out-of-
court settlement of three antitrust
suits pending against the firm.
Ramsden told the Senate Judi-
ciary Committee, however, his
study was a very narrow one, al-
most exclusively limited to show-
- - - - - -- - -

DoesiftG
realize the da'
corporatep
There was a time, fifty or sixty
years ago, when a major corporation
in America might expect profits of
twenty or even twenty-five cents on
the sales dollar.
Those days are over. But not
everybody realizes it.
What would you call enornous?
In 1970, Fortune's Top 500 indus-
trial corporations realized an average
profit of about 4 cents on
the dollar.
General Electricfared
slightly better than
average. Last year,
our profits amount-
ed to about 5 cents
on the dollar.
We are occasion-
ally attacked, along
with business in
general, as being
"too profit-oriented."
People argue that if social progress
is to be made, business must make it.
And that profits stand in the way of
social progress.
Wewould argue quite the opposite.
The business of business is not just
business.
The purpose of a busi-

.ne
its

ral

Electric

}.

i enormous
are over?

"A MASTERPIECE!"
-PAUL [. ZIMMERMAN, Newsweek
WINNER OF 2 ACADEMY AWARDS!
Plus Oscar-Winning Cartoon
"The Crunch Bird"
FEATURE2
AT
r' Dial

I
S. State St.
iI 662-6264

1 1 1 IS A
ing how ITT stockholders would
lose if the conglomerate were
forced to drop the giant Hartford
Fire Insurance Corp. of New Ha-
ven.
Ramsden said he was asked by
White House aide Peter Flanigan
last May to study the Hartford di-
vestiture proposed yfen in court
suits filed by then Asst. Atty. Gen.
Richard McLaren.
Ramsden said he dealt only with
Flanigan, never speaking with
either McLaren or Deputy Atty.
Gen. Richard Kleindienst, Presi-
dent Nixon's nominee to be attor-
ney general.
The Senate committee is inves-
tigating supposed links between
ITT and Kleindienst.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Sessionpublished Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mall (in Mich. of
hdo); $7.50 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
IL ___ i

But if society profits and the busi-
ness does not, the business will fold in
the short run. It will have no operat-
ing funds.
How much h
profit is enough to .
keep a .business
operating? How-
much is too much? t,.
It's hard to say.
However, the
companies mak- "
ing only marginal
profit are not the
companies provid-
ing new employment, creating new
products or adding to man's scientific
and technical knowledge.
Marginal companies are not the
ones making the important social con-
tributions today. For a simple reason.
They can't afford to.
No responsible company wants a
return to the days of the robber bar-
ons. No responsible company wants
"enormous" profits. But no company,
can survive without the profit system.
Why are we running this ad?
General Electric is a big, techno-
logical company, with the capabilities
to do a great deal of problem solving
in this country.
We think profits have a direct
effect on our ability to solve
problems. But we realize the is-
sue of profits is one with two
sides. By telling you our side,
we hope we've moved you to
think about your side. Perhaps
even write us about it.
0 We'd like to hear what you
have to say. Please write to
General Electric, Dept. 901
570 Lexington Avenue, New
... York, N.Y. 10021.

- -
- - -,
r:"-,;
' - -
*t*.+ %.

a A-J - m -

Celebrate the"
Coming of Spring.1
(and the end of the semester)
LSA COFFEE HOUR
TODAY
3:30-4:30

TUESDAY and
WEDNESDAY
THE
MARX
BROS*
IN
LOVE
HAPPY
Dir. David Miller, 1949
THE BROTHERS
CUT LOOSE!
Plus a short by
HARRY LANGDON
ARCH ITECTU RE
AUDITORIUM
7 and 9 P.M. 75c

2549 LSA

Bldg.

APPLE CIDER AND COOKIES!

I

. -

I

OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT
1 p.m., 4:30, 8 p.m.
Mon.-Sat. $1.50 until 4:30
Mon. -Thurs. eve. $2.00
Fri. and Sat. eve. $2.50
All Day Sunday $2.50
603 E. Liberty
DIAL 665-6290

ness, as we see it is to pro-
duce and distribute
necessary goods and serv-
ices to theprofit of society
... and the business itself.
A business must re-
flect society's needs. Eco-
nomic, political, legal
and moral, as well as
social. It must change as
society changes and, to
some extent, influence
those changes.

i
quo

SOCIOLOGY COLLOQUIUM
On
Oganizational Bhaio
REX BROWN
(Assoc. Professor, Business Ad.)
BETTYE EIDSON
(Asst. Professor, Dept. of Sociology)
ROBERT L. KAHN

III

I 11

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iii*~

I A 11 11 it1 11161

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