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April 14, 1972 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-14

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, April 14, 1972

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY

City budget slashes
appear imminent
(continued from Page 1) man resources in programs like
cally-based university, day-care will remain at their pres-
The city and the University are ent levels.
currently negotiating a new con- The layoffs, if necessary, will be
tractual agreement, and according particularly hard on minority em-
' ;.h l+ es Shehans aid Blacks have

Community events at 'U' this weekend

Enact bike raffle Center. For more information call
i 764-4410or 761-3186.

f
l'
1
l
1
1

to one officiai in the University' s "y, .
Public Safety Office, "It is real- been hired in greater numbers re-
istic to assume that the University cently and they will be the first
will be paying the city for its po- employes fired because of their
lice services." low seniority.
If stis.money doesCity Council will hold several
If this money does come open and closed meetings on the
through, layoffs will probably niot budget before they take final ac-
be necessary in the department, tion on the measure May 8. Ac-
Sheehan said, and it is possible: contheeanr usantAl
that nine additional officers would coding to Sheehan,barseunil
be hired for the new campus i-chneby ouilae niky
vin rbecause there is little flexibility in
vision. the budget.
Additional layoffs are slated for Jerry De Grieck (HRP-First
the fire department and the plan- Ward) says, however, that he will
ning commission. The budget does try to make certain adjustments in
not provide funds for new equip- the priorities of the new budget.
ment or pay increases, and the "I would rather cut the salaries
city's limited contributions to hu- of people at the top." De Grieck
comments, "than have to lay off
large numbers of people at the
Plower levels of the departmenis"
Picketers De Grieck also plans to press for
a cut in the police budget, and
protest air hopes to get the funds transferred
to social welfare programs like
r day-care and housing.
d fforRepublican Fairbanks is noti
w ar el 1or s happy with the prospect of cut-
backs in personnel and services,
but he feels that they may be ne-
(Continued from Page 1) oessary.
make them now is because they "I think we may have to go
didn't get any contracts. They'd through a period of tight money,"
take the contracts again if they he says, "so people can see if that
were offered." is in fact what they want."
One possibility for alleviating
lthoughsi thereawereeeral- the fiscal problem is a proposed
lice arshoin ther arethevdemon 2.5 mil increase in the city's pop-
stration remained peaceful. Sher -2.milncesinteiy'pr-
heerty tax. City voters will decide
if ' f Duglas Hveyaid that that question in a referendum that
wouldn't do anything "as long as will appear on the May 16 primary
they keep it orderly." ballot.
Haavey reached the scene a few Officials concede that the mill-
minutes after the demonstration age increase may be defeated, giv-
began, with a crew of camera men en city voters' past voting record
to take television video tapes of on tax increases.
the protest. When asked about the Federal revenue sharing repre-
cameras, Harvey said, "We always sents another possible solutib to
film it . . . we just keep it on file." the problem but Sheehan says,
The demonstrators arrived at "We were talking about the pos-
Hoover shortly after the 3:30 shift sibility of revenue-sharing last
was let out. They passed out leaf- year at this time, and the situa-
lets to the departing workers, and tion doesn't look much better
tried to talk with them. now."

Today at noon on the Diag!
ENACT is holding a free raffle.
Giveaways include a bicycle, bike
accessories, walking shoes, Ann
Arbor Transit Authority bus passes
and a pogo stick. The raffle is
part of ENACT's effort to promote
non-polluting forms of transporta-
tion.
A bike-a-thon, sponsored in con-
junction with the Ecology Center
and the Ann Arbor Bicycle League
is set for 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., April
23 to raise funds for environmental
activity, promote transportation
alternatives and "to get bike
freaks together for fun."
Each participant will be respon-
sible for finding a sponsor to
pledge a mutually agreed-upon
amount of money per mile. Con-
tributions will go to the environ-
mental groups co-ordinating the
project.
Forms are available in the Fish-
bowl, the UGLI, the University
Cellar, ENACT and the Ecology
Communists
hit An Loc
(Continued from Page 1)
missing apparently were aboard
aircraft lost to the Communists.
South Vietnamese headquarters
reported a 30 per cent increase in
casualties over the previous week
with 641 government troops killed
and 2,166 wounded. Communist
casualties claimed by the govern-
ment increased nearly 40 per cent,
from 2,150 two weeks ago to 2,987
last week.
CREATIVE
SHABBAT
SERVICE
Every Friday-6:15 p.m.
HILLEL-1429 Hill

File review deadline
Today is the deadline for wo-
men to request that their files be
reviewed to determine possible sex
discrimination. Any woman staff
hember who feels her salary rep-
resents sex discrimination may
complain to the Commission for
Women without going through the
full grievance procedure.
Complainants should contact
Virginia Davis Nordin, women's
commission chairwoman.
In February increases in sal-
aries totaling $94,295 were grant-
ed to 100 University women em-
ployes in both academic and non-
academic positions, as part of the
University's affirmative action
program for the elimination of sex
discrimination.
Jazz for Cockrel
A jazz workshop this afternoon
in Aud. A, Angell Hall is planned
to raise money for Ken Cockrel's
Campaign for the Detroit mayor-
alty.
Cockrel, a black revolutionary
lawyer, has been active in local
radical politics, particularly in
campaigns against the STRESS
unit of the Detroit police. STRESS
forces have killed 14 persons, 13
of them black, within the past
year.
Although Cockrel says he is a
serious candidate, he concedes his
main motive in running is to gar-
ner publicity for radical views oft-
en neglected by establishment me-
dia.

Supporters of Cockrel hope to the Detroit area this weekend.
raise $40,000 for the campaign by Sens. Hubert Humphrey (D-
fall, 1973. Minn.),George McGovern (D-
S.D.) and Edmund Muskie (D-
Women in law Me.) will address a gathering of
midwestern Democrats tomorrow
The Ann Arbor Women's Crisis at the annual Jefferson-Jackson
Center will sponsor a teach-in on Day fund-raising dinner.
"Women in Law" tomorrow. Thel Gov. George Wallace of Ala-
conference, starting at 10 o'clock, bama was not invited to the din-
will be held at St. Andrew's Church ner, which some black and labor
on the corner of Catherine and leaders had threatened to boy-
Division. Icott if he attended. Wallace will

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Speaking on the topics of what
women can do for protection inf
divorce, what rights a woman
loses in marriage, and what wo-
men need to know to handle wel-
fare bureaucracy will be Shirley
Bourgoyne, lawyer for the State
Women's Commission, Kate Emer-
son of the Welfare Rights Organi-
zation, and others.
Discussion groups will be held
in the afternoon.
Wallace, Dems speak
Four Democratic presidential
hopefuls will be campaigning in
Books
Trveln
Books
Childrens
Books

hold a competing rally at the
State Fairgrounds the same day,
and protesters plan to greet him
there.
Organization Notices
Gay Liberation Spring Dance, April
14, 8:00 PM, First Unitarian Church,
Washtenaw at Berkshire.
A Conference on Women and the
Law will be held at St. Andrew's Epis-
copal Church, 306 N. Division, April 15,
10:00 AM - 3:00 PM. All interested
women are welcome.
For The Student Body:
LEVI'S
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The Gilbert and Sullivan Society
announces that petitions are being accepted for
next fall for the following positions:
DRAMATICS DIRECTOR
MUSICAL DIRECTOR
TECHNICAL DIRECTOR
Submit a resume to G & S office by April 18. 2531 SAB,
if there are any questions, please call 769-5116, (5:00 p.m.)
Join The Daily Ad Staff

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Help Your Brother!
Draft
Counselors
Needed
Prepare now for training
sessions in May. After
the training program,
counsel one two-hour ses-
sion per week.
IF INTERESTED,
COME IN TO
ANN ARBOR
DRAFT COUNSELING
CENTER
502 East Huron
(Baptist Center)
M-F 3-5 & 7-9
Sat. 10-Noon

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FRIDAY, APRIL 14
ALL-CAMPUS DANCE
Rock 'n Roll to a young Ann Arbor band
SUNDOG

State Street at Liberty

F.

Most employes seemed recep-
tive and opened their car win-
dows to accept leaflets. .
The demonstrators held a short
rally while awaiting the next shift
of workers. At 4:30 they crowded
around the plant's doors to hand
leaflets to departing employes.
A man who identified himself
as a part of Hoover's management
was asked by Griffin, "Do you feel
any moral responsibility concern-
ing Hoover's contracts?" He, how-
ever, did not comment.
SUMMER
SUBLET
The Heritage House
829 Tappan
Apt. 404
! DISHWASHER
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TAX
WAORKSH OP
Saturday, April 15
10:30 a.m.
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
Conference Rooms 4 & 5
Buy your lunch at the League-or bring it. We'll
supply the beverages.
In Parade Magazine on Sunday, April 2, 1972: "Q.
How much do federal law enforcement agencies pay
informers?-Maurice Katz, Newark, N.J. A. The
U.S. Justice Department disclosed earlier this year
that it would like $8 million in the next fiscal year
to pay informers and buy evidence. The FBI would
spend about $2.5 million. The Bureau of Narcotics
and Dangerous Drugs would spend $5 million. Other
agencies such as Immigration and Naturalization
would spend the remainder."
The money that the government spends is your
money. Individual income taxes account for 55%
of the administrative budget. Excise taxes-like the
tax on your telephone-account for another 10%
-and essentially, excise taxes are paid for by in-
dividuals.
YOU HAVE THE POWER TO REFUSE TO PAY
YOUR INCOME AND EXCISE TAXES. YOU HAVE
THE POWER TO WITHHOLD YOUR TAX MONEY
FROM THE GOVERNMENT. Find out how by at-
tending the workshop. Meet people who have been
refusing to pay-some for many years.
TOPICS TO BE DISCUSSED:
If you have not filed your 1040 yet (they must be postmarked
before midnight on Monday, April 17) : find out how to refuse
all or part of your 1971 income taxes.
If you have already filed your 1040, there are still many options
available:
1. LEGALLY, you may be entitled to "special" exemption on
your W-4 form (line 3). Forms will be available at the workshop.
2. LEGALLY, if your anticipated income this year is less than
$1700, you should file a W-4E form with your employer. W-4E's
will also be available at the workshop.
3. As an act of resistance, you can claim additional itemized
deductions on your W-4 (line 6), to reduce or eliminate with-
holding taxes. Find out how that works.
4. Don't pay the telephone tax. Find out what happens when you
refuse this tax.

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