100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 21, 1972 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, January 21, 1972

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, January 21, 1972

1U

records

raffic Faces,

Byr

By HARRY HAMMITT
Two recent releases are by
English bands of some repute,
Traffic and the Faces. Since
these two bands have been re-
sponsible for some really good
music in the past, it is not ask-
ing too much to assume that
they will continue.
The Faces have come a long
way since "Itchycoo Park."Sing-
er-guitarist Steve Marriott has
left the group for Humble Pie,
and has been replaced with Ron
Wood on guitars. But, still, this
isn't why the Faces are well-
known today. Their tremendous
success lies in the fact that they
were joined by Rod Stewart, on
vocals soon after Wood joined.
With one promising album un-
der their belts, the Small Faces
dropped the Small from their
name and became the Faces.
On their second album, they
gave some idea of what they
were like on stage with great
live versions of "Maybe I'm
Amazed," and "Feel So Good,"
both recorded at the Fillmore
East.
Now the Faces have given us
their third, and best, album, A
Nod is as Good as a Wink ...
To a Blind Horse (Warner
Brothers 2574). For the first
time, they have captured the
raw energy of their stage act in-
the studio. Credit for this goes
to Glyn Johns who has per-
formed miracles with other
bands. The Faces derive a good
deal of their inspiration from
the Stones. This album has a
well-balanced selection of
raunchy rockers and country
blues-rock. As a band, the Faces
are hard to beat. Wood is one
of the most innovative rock gu-
tarists around. Ian McLagan, on
keyboards, is only slightly short
of genius. Drummer Kenny Jones
is definitely amongst the very
best of rock's drummers. Bassist
Ronnie Lane is solid, steady, a
good composer, and an unique
singer. Take all these talents,
put them with the immeasurable
talents of Rod Stewart, and you
have a combination that can't
go wrong. And, as can be ex-
pected, they don't
The album commences with a
strong rocker, "Miss Judy's
Farm" which is based on a riff
played incomparably by Wood,
ending with punctual soloes
from Wdod and McLagan.
"You're So Rude" is next, and.
it doesn's rock in the Faces',
normal context, but comes over
more like a fifties' rocker. The
vocal is by Ronnie Lane who
sings in an almost conversa-
tional tone; his pauses are ex-
tremely effective, and his de-
livery is unbeatable. When.Wood
comes in on harmonica, the tune
is made even better.
"Love Lives Here" is a pas-
sionate lament by the Faces
concerning the destruction of
the pubs and pool halls that
they used to frequent. Stewart's
delivery is tasteful and passion-
ate. Following this is "Last Or-
ders Please," another nostalgic
rocker by Lane which is given a
touching performance.
Side one ends with "Stay
With Me" a Wood-Stewart clas-
sic if there ever was one. Over
one of thebest, most memorable,
strong raucous rockers of past
years, Stewart belts out his
unique type of lyric.
You won't need too much per-
suading, I don't mean to
sound degrading
But with a face like that you
got nothin' to laugh about
Red lips, hair, and fingernails,
I hear you're a mean old
Jezabel
Let's go upstairs and read my
tarot cards
The song ends with short soloes

by Wood, McLagan, and Jones,
suddenly changing tempos and
cutting off, leaving the listener
hungry for more.
On the other side is "Debris,"
Program Information 8-6416
TONIGHT
AT
7 and 9 P.M.
"AN ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING FILM!
A TOPNOTCH
THRILLER!"
-JUDITH CRIST,
I A IIEW YORK MAGAZINE

a cross between a slow tune by
the Stones aid the Band, Lane
singing with Stewart aiding on
the chorus. After, is "Memphis,"
a relaxed, subdued version of
the Chuck Berry classic. "Too
Bad" is another captivating
rocker with Stewart contribut-
ing his typical whimsical lyrics.
Finally, "That's All You Need"
which is the sequel to "Plynth,
featuring Wood flailing away on
slide guitar, while Stewart sings
the story-lyine above him, and
Jones keeps things on the right
track.
All together, a really fine al-
bum by the Faces. Hopefully this
record will help clear up the
misconception that has plagued
the Faces for so long: Rod Stew-
art is not the Faces. Stewart is
nowhere without the Faces. the
band is a whole, not Rod Stew-
art and the Faces, but just the
Faces.
Traffic is another one of the
finest English bands. Based on
the talents of Steve Winwood,
and beautifully complimented
by the talents of Jim Capaldi
and Chris Wood, Traffic has
given the public many a fine al-
bum Traffic, too, has under-
gone some changes since its in-
ception. The band broke up
about two years ago, and then
re-formed as a trio. They did
JOHN BARLEYCORN and soon
after, they brought in Rick
Grech on bass and violin. This
was criticized by many who felt
that Grech would destroy the
unique form of improvisation
that 'Traffic was known for.
Then came a change that no
one had exnected. Jim Gordon,
from Mad Dogs, and the Dom-
inoes, was taken on as drum-
mer, and Capaldi was moved to
the position of singer. A conga
player named Rebop was also
added at the same time. These
changes seemed to make no
sense since Capaldi was an ex-
cellent drummer, and there was
no need for a singer because
Steve Winwood is one of the
finest singers there is. The
group was looked upon with ap-
prehension and their new album
was eagerly awaited. They put
out an album called WELCOME
TO THE CANTEEN which was
only a live version of their old
hits and didn't show what their
new sound would be like. Now,
they have released their long-
awaited studio album, The Low
Spark of High-Heeled Boys
'Island SW-9306), and it's been
worth the wait.
Traffic has changed, but not
as much as expected. Gordon is
a fine drummer and fills in well
for Capaldi. What's more, the
congas fit in very well. The mu-
sic is typically Traffic, most of
the songs done by the Winwood-
Capaldi team. As can be expect-
ed, Winwood shines throughout.
especially on guitar which he
plays more often than keyboards.
Winwood handles most of the
singing, with Capaldi taking the
lead on two songs. Most of Win-
wood's tunes are calm and in-
trospective, such as "Hidden
Treasure," "Many a Mile to
Freedom," and "Rainmaker."
There are two faster paced
tunes, one by Capaldi, "Light up
or Leave Me Alone," and "Rock
& Roll Stew," by Grech and
Gordon. "Rock & Roll Stew" is
a different thing for Traffic;
it Is more reminiscent of Blind

Faith in its steady riff with ex-
tended guitar solo. The title
song is the long piece and it's
a good one. It uses the familiar
Winwood ploy, starts out with
a slow tune and moves in to a
bouncy chorus. Throughout the
middle, is some reflective piano
by Winwood and a little bit of
sax from Wood. Grech is given
a violin solo on "Rainmaker"
and he makes it short and to
the point. The only disappoint-
ment is the unaccountable lack
of soloing by Wood. He is rele-
gated to a supportive role, one
which he is brilliant in with
highly intelligent and tasteful
flute passages. This is a highly
satisfying album, another in the
long line of good albums that
Traffic has done.
The Faces and Traffic are,
and rightfully deserve to be, in
the forefront of rock music.
These records are just another
brilliant chapter in their careers.
The two records are even more
satisfying because of the im-
peccable production. The public
deserves good music, and the
Faces and Traffic can be re-
lied on to give it to them; they
won 't let you down.
The Byrds were one of the
first important bands of the six-
ties. Their version of Dylan's
"Mr. Tambourine Man." was a
major breakthrough for that
era. The Byrds are still around
today, although the group has
undergone major changes. The
most famous Byrd, David Cros-
by. has left to make a name for
himself elsewhere. Other mem-
bers of the original group left
to form the Flying Burrito
Brothers. The only original
member still around is Roger
McGuinn, the old lead singer
who used to wear the tinted
sunglasses. The Byrds kept
plodding along, becoming an
institution of American music
on the way. The Byrds are taken
for granted which is the trouble
with too many musicians these
days. When a band realizes that
they are taken for granted and
that not many people notice
them anymore, they just might
quit playing. If the Byrds quit
playing, the public is going to
lose out, because the Byrds play
some mighty fine music.
This all leads to the Byrds'
new album, Farther Along (Co-
lumbia KC 31050) which they
recorded in London during their
summer European tour. If the
Byrds are to be classified, they
would probably be referred to as
country-rock, but they're closer
TG
Delta Sigma Delta
Fraternity
FRI., JAN. 21, 8-11 p.m.
Live Band & Refreshments
1502 Hill St.

ds roc)
to country rock 'n' roll than
anything else. This album is evi-
dence of this country rock 'n'
roll aspect along with a few
more traditional country things.
The album begins with "Tif-
fany Queen" which is quite a
pleasing rocker sung by Mc-
Guinn who is the only person
I've ever heard sing with a lisp.
That's not at all bad, it only
adds to the uniqueness of his
tunes. This number is quickly
followed up by "Get Down Your
Line" which starts out as a
catchy country tune, but by the
chorus the song is rocking with
the best of them. Then the sec-
ond chorus comes along with
some really fine harmonica
which continues in the back-
ground during the vocal. The
song fades out on some fitting
scat singing which is shared be-
tween two voices.
The listener then gets a
change of pace with "Further
Along" which is a traditional
spiritual. The tune is good and
it's played well, but what really
makes the song is the soothing
mandolin - work of Clarence
White. White doesn't try to
show off on the mandolin, but
is satisfied to remain in the
background throughout the song.
In just this way the mandolin
fits beautifully, making the en-
tire song something special.
'"B. B. Class Road" is probably
the most rocking number of the
album. The playing isn't spec-
tacular, but then the song
doesn't call for superhuman ef-
fort, it's just a throwback to the
fifties rock 'n' roll. The harmon-
ica, guitar, and particularly the
piano are played to perfection.
They're just what the tune calls
for.
Side one is climaxed by "Bug-
ler" which starts out almost ex-
actly like Rod Stewart's "Man-
dolin Wind," but quickly changes
into its own tune, another coun-
try spiritual. This time the man-
dolinis perhaps just a little too
subdued.
What comes next is a whim-
sicial number entitled "America's
Great National Pastime" which
rocks well enough. Besides that,
it puts across a nice lyrical mes-
sage which takes a pessimistic
view of American society. The
song sounds like a string of
----- --- -- ~
(OUZENS
FILM (0-OP
presents
"A Man Called Horse"
starring
Richard Harris
at: COUZENS HALL
FRI. & SAT.-7 &r9
ADMISSION 75c

American cliches sung like they
came straight from an AM radio
jingle.
"Antique Sandy" is certainly
a good song, but not as good as
some of the other tunes. It
sounds more like the Byrds of
the past few years. "Precious
Kate" is just a nice, but typical,
country-rock tune. It features
some good piano, and a sensi-
tive, but short, guitar solo. "So
Fine" is another rocker, but this
one was written by Johnny Otis
and it falls short of what the
Byrds do for themselves. Even
so, the tune rocks well and the
guitar passages are handled with
originality and sensitivity. "Lazy
Waters" is the type{ of song that
the title implies. The song is de-
livered in a plaintive manner. It
floats along until a beautiful,
sensitive harmonica solo takes
over where the singer leaves off.
The singing comes on again
with several repetitions of the
chorus and the song's loose ends
are then tied up by a duet of
the guitar and the piano. The
only complaint about, this song
is that the harmonica doesn't
last longer than it does. The al-
bum is finished off by "Bristol
Steam Convention Blues" which
is a typical country banjo-pick-
ing tune which displays some
fine interplay between the gui-
tars and the banjo, but no over-
whelming banjo playing.
The album doesn't quite rate
as a masterpiece, but it has
more than its share of fine mu-
sic. All members of the band
are good, but credit is due par-
ticularly to Clarence White's
mandolin, Skip Battin's fine pi-
ano, and, especially, Gene Par-
son for his great work on drums,
harmonica, and banjo.
The Byrds are the type of
group that would probably be
fantastic jamming. The rough-
ness of a jam is glossed over
here, but then the best diamonds
are those that are polished.

on

DOROTHY
and
THE WIZARD
(in the land of -Oz)
See the Good Witch, the
Evil Witch, the Scare-
crow, the Tin Man and
the Cowardly Lion on the
big Screen at
Saturday and Sunday nights

*

at
MAST'CA.M.

DOWNTOWN
217 S. Main St.

2 LOCATIONS

619 E. Liberty

Clint Eastwi
IS
Dirty Harry

rand.

~it's

a

Sizzler"

.4
$;

"ONE OF THE
YEAR'S TEN
BEST"

IAdR -Adi d

-Ken Barnard, Detroit News
* STARTS THURSDAY *
Program Information 2-6264
At State and Liberty

OPEN
1 P.M.
Shows at
1:15, 3:10,
5, 7, &
9 P.M.
Subscribe0to The Michign Daily__

I

aI

I

Tonight Only
DUET FOR
CANNIBALS
Dir. Susan Sontag, 1969
The great critic/novelist
turns to film. Susan's first
feature made in Sweden
in a genre which Berg-
man made famous: the
Swedish chamber drama.
Two earnest revolutiona-
ries serve as fodder for
an elder couple's psycho-
logical and sexual feast.

A

STOP
RAPE

a

4

Conference .

5

Sponsored by: Ann'Arbor Womer's Crisis Center
Conducted by: Detroit Women Against Rape

All WOMEN Welcome * Admission Free * WOMEN ONLY!!

*

I

"THE MOVIE IS A GREAT BIG RICH
AMERICAN.XPERIENCE.SGO I"
-COSMOPOLITAN MAGAZINE
7P5lI155II115i7 ... is better than he has

ARCH ITECTU RE
AUDITORIUM
7:00 and 9:00
75c

STOP RAPE!
Saturday, Jan. 22
10:00A.M.-3:00 P.M.
St. Andrew's Church
N. Division at Catherine
SOUP, BREAD & BEVERAGE
PROVIDED for 50c
CALL LOUISE AFTER 6 P.M. AT
761-0422 for CHILD
CARE ARRANGEMENTS
COPIES WILL BE AVAILABLE OF:
STOP-RAPE HANDBOOK (25c)
SELF DEFENSE FOR WOMEN (95c)

I

" DISCUSSION: RAPE AS
AN INSTITUTION
Who Are Rapists?
What Sort of Women Get
Raped?
Where? When? Why?
What Happens Afterwards?
With Police? In Court?
In Our Heads?
Why Are Few Rapists
Prosecuted and Fewer
Convicted?
" FIGHTING BACK:
Dealing with Rape/Rapists
Aggressively.
Demonstration and Practice
of Self-Defense Methods.
* WOMEN'S STREET
THEATER-On Rape
AND MORE!

f
yi _

i - - - - -

been in years!"
-TIME MAGAZINE
;'.the best work
'ofalifetimel"
-TIME MAGAZINE

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

7IEIJRFGI1II

I

70%,166RmC

.. is simply fantastic!"
-COSMOPOIUTAN MAGAZINE
d- CORONET MAGAZINE

2 Performances!-Tonight and Sat.

... finei1"
- CBSJTV

JACK
MACGOWRAN

DRei
'wRK

FRI.
& SAT.
JAN.
10' --

+4

MF - . -.M - U " E A ..7 'l

U i --

.

.

.

U ~ ~' I

i _ _ _ _ _

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan