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April 09, 1972 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 9, 1972 I

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, April 9, 1972

Nicklaus

holds

to

so

By The Associated Press awesome presence of the famed
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Jack Nick- and feared "Golden Bear," bird-
laus faltered in the stretch but ied three of four holes in one
still retained a one-stroke lead stretch on the back nine and had
over the surprising charge of long- a third-round 71.
shot Jimmy Jamieson yesterday He bogeyed the final hole -
in the third round of the Masters after national television coverage
Golf tournament. had broken away - to lose a
Nicklaus, who appeared as if chance for a share of the lead. He
ready to run away and hide from bowed his head is dismay, briefly,
the field most of the crisp, cloudy when a six foot par-saving putt
day, finished bogey-bogey for a missed - then looked up and
one over 73 on the damp and grinned again.
heavy Augusta National Golf Club Paul Harney, the 42-year-old
course. silver fox who trailed big Jack by
Nicklaus, who has led or shared a single stroke when the day's
the lead all the way in this tour- play started on the course damp-
nament - the first of four major ened by an overnight shower, took
chamnionshins he hopes tose;a 75 for 215. He was tied at that

t
c
I

the day. Mitchell had a 71 and tive as ever, stumbled around in
Heard 72. 177 and was far, far back in the
Bert Yancey, just two strokes field with a 228 total. "I'm going
off the pace after two rounds, for 80 tomorrow," he grinned.
blew to a 76 and 217. "Now I know how Arnold won
He wasn't the only one to have four Masters," Jamieson said.
problems. however. . "When those people get behind
Defending champion Charles you and start cheering for you,
Coody had a seven on his card en and pulling for you, well, it really
route to a 74-217 but warned: "I gets you pumped up.
don't think Nicklaus is out of "They did it for me today and
reach. I can still catch him." it really does something to you,"
Arnold Palmer three-putted the husky, stocky 28-year-old said.
from 10 feet on the final hole for "I'm sorry I had to make bogey
a 74-219. South African Gary on that last hole: That hurt a lit-
Player and Billy Casper were at tIe. But I'd made some good putts
990 Cn zp xih h 7d dn Pinp. and I cn't complain.

this season - had a 54-hole to-
tal of 212, four under par.
It was just one stroke better
than the 213 by Jamieson, a little
round man from Moline, Ill., who
has never won as a pro and last
winter lost his status- as an exempt
player on the pro tour.
Jamieson, undaunted by the

figure with Tom Weiskopf, who
closed up with a 70.
They were the only other play-
ers under par after three rounds.
Tied at par 216, were Homer
Blancas, Australian Bruce Cramp-
ton, Jerry Heard and Bobby Mit-
chell. Blancas and Crampton had
69s, matching the best round of

z, uasper wit a r4
72.
Lee Trevino, brash
Golfing Ma
THIRD ROUND SC

a - denotes amat

I

1-

U

9 _1

1

Throw a Frisbee for a Change!
OR TRY US, ALPHA EPSILON PI-THE "UNFRATERNITY"
CALLED A "CO-OP" AND "COMMUNE," WE'RE A-
RADICAL EXPRESSION OF JEWISH COMMUNAL LIVING
3 KOSHER MEALS DAILY-MOSTLY SINGLE ROOMS-GROUP DECISIONS
A TRULY DEMOCRATIC HOUSE-GOOD LOCATION-GOOD PEOPLE-LOW COSTS

Jack Nicklaus
Jim Jamieson
Paul Harney
Tom Weiskopf
Jerry Heard
Bobby Mitchell
Bruce Crampton
Homer Blancas
Bert Yancey
Charles Coody
Steve Melnyk
Jerry McGee
Bruce Devlin
Arnold Palmer
Gary Player
Billy Casper
Al Geiberger
Dave Stockton
Sam Snead
Robertnde Vicenzo
George Archer
a-Ben Crenshaw
Takaaki ono
Lanny Wadkins
Bob Goalby
Gardner Dickinson
Bob Charles
Gibby Gilbert
Harry Bannerman
Hubert Green
Bobby Nichols
J. C. Snead
Tony Jacklin
Grier Jones
a-Thomas O. Kite, Jr.
a-James B. Simons
Lu Liang-Huan
Bert Greene
Bob Murphy
a-James C. McLean
Lee Trevino
Ken Still
Larry Hinson
Frank Beard
Peter Oosterhuis
Bob Rosburg
DeWitt Weaver

ana rayer
Nicklaus had a four-stroke lead
and talka- most of the day.
But Jamieson, one of the high-
est - priced longshots in a field of
sters the world's best, a steady strug-
gler on the pro tour gunning for
:ORES one of the game's great upsets,
eat began his move on the 14th hole.
He speared an iron to within
68-71-73-212 five feet of the hole there - and
72-70-71-213 made the putt.
71-69-75-215 He and Nicklaus both failed to
74-71-70-215
73-71-72-216 birdie the par five 15th. Jack,
73-72-71-216 playing one group behind Jamie-
72-75-69-216 son hit an iron over the green on
76-71-69-216
72-69-76-217 his second shot, chipped poorly
73-70-74-217 and two-putted from 30 feet.
72-72-74-218 On the next one, a par three, JACK
73-7471-218 Jamieson lofted an iron over the one stroke
70-75-74-219 war and canned what he called oesrk
73-75-7?-220 a 20-foot putt. 'Nicklaus missed tournament
75-71-74-220 from 12 feet moments later. en Bear ver
76-70-74-220
76-70-74-220
75-62 18OF 19 SETS W ON:
73-75-72-220
73-74-74-221 1
16-72-73-221
72-72-77-221
73-76-72-221
777-3 2221

-Associated Press
NICKLAUS, grimacing over a missed putt, takes a
lead into today's final round of the Masters golf
. The Augusta National course has treated the Gold-
ry well as he is four-under-par after three rounds.

)lank

Iowa

I

WHERE ARE YOU LIVING NEXT YEAR?

CHECK

INTO

AEP

72-76-74-222 By JIM ECKER
72-76-74-222
78-72-72-222 The Michigan tennis team
75-74-74-223 obliterated Iowa yesterday, white-
72-71-80-223 washing the Hawkeyes 9-0. The
74-77-72-223 yellow-and-white clad Blue team
72-76-75-223 I was expecting a stern test from
73-75-76-224 Iowa. Instead, one of the -easiest
74-74-76-224 wins of the year resulted.
71-79-76-226 For thewsecond straight day
75-72-87-227 .
75-75-77-227 fair to the confines of the I.M.
75-76-77-228 building. Coach Brian Eisner did
75-75-78-228 not feel that his boys had an
75-76-77-228 overwhelming homecourt edge,
74-77-77-228 however, "we would have had an
77-74-79-230 advantage if we had been practic-
72-79-79-230 ing in here. But we've been prac-
74-73-83-230 ticing at other indoor courts."
74-76-81-231 Michigan zipped through the

first five singles events, winning
every set of every match, Captain
Joel Ross withstood the challenge
of Bruce Nagel to win 6-3, 6-2.
Coach Winnie of Iowa had de-
scribed Nagel as "vastly improv-
ed over last year, when he was
our number four singles player.
He's capable of upsetting Ross."
Dick Ravreby was barely press-
ed in copping the third singles,
easily downing Lee Wright 6-1,
6-2. Ravreby won the first four
games, then rebounded from a
momentary spurt by Wright to
win the first set. In the second,
both players exchanged service
breaks into a 2-2 tie. However
Ravreby regained command and

CALL: MARC-764-8735 or RICK-764-8736
AEPI-THE "NEW ORDER" OF FRATERNITIES

L'

J

rolled to the 6-2 victory.
The fifth singles match, be-
tween Kevin Senich and Rob Gris-
wold, was decided on Senich's
lightning-quick serves. The slight-
ly grizzled Griswold shook his
head as Senich continually glasted*
away at his challenger. "His serves
look like they're coming out of a
cannon," moaned Griswold. Sen-
ich parlayed his overwhelming ad-
vantage into an impressive 6-4,
6-2 victory.
Jeff Miller and Tim Ott, Michi-.
gan's number two and four mer
respectively, also disposed of their
opponentsin straight sets. Miller
took Rod Kubat 6-2, 6-4 while
Ott defeated Ian Phillips 7-5, 6-3.
It wasn't until the sixth singles
match that Iowa copped its first
set. Hawkeye Steve Dickinson re-
covered from Jerry Karzen's open-4
ing 6-4 success to win the second
set in ti'e-breaking fashion 7-6.
However. Dickinson blew Iowa'is
best chance when he dropped the
decisive third set, 6-4.
Dougles action produced the fi-
nal three Michigan victories, all in
the minimal number of sets. Th*
teams of Ross-Ravreby and Mil-
ler-Mike Ware quickly plastered
their foes. The former knocked off
Nagel and Wright 6-2, 6-2, while
the latter took Griswold and Dick-
inson 6-1, 6-3. Senich and Kar-
zen were pressed - by Kubat and
Phillips in their contest before tht
Hawkeye pair succumbed 7-6, 6-3.

f
i
I

S BIG GEORGE MAKES THE COMPETITION OTHERS TRY TO MEET! I
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By BOB HALVAKS
Although it was cold outside
Coach Dixon Farmer's track menI
warmed things up a little bit in
Yost Fieldhouse after moving their
previously scheduled outdoor op-
ener in from the cold, by down-
ing Ohio University 100-36.
STEVE ADAMS got the fire
started by becoming the second
shot putter in the Big Ten to
throw the weighted ball 60 feet.
With each of his first four tosses
toward a 60-1%/ average Adams
set and broke his own individual
record. His best toss of 61-0 now;
stands as the new school and
fieldhouse record.
Adams was surprised with his
performance saying, "I have been
working mainly on my strength
the past few weeks and have not
concentrated much on my form,
so I expected only to hit around
the 58 foot mark."
Coach Farmer sees Adams' next
goal at 62-4, the qualifying dis-
tance for the Olympics, although
Adams himself hopes to toss 65-0
outdoors with the lighter shot put.
After his sparkling performance
in the shot put Adams went on to
win the discus competition with
a throw of 157-2 after a follow
throw of 168-0. This competition
was the only held outside on Fer-
ry Field.
The most exciting running event
of the day was the mile run with
two career bests posted in a one-
two-three finish for the Wol-
verines. Mike Pierce won the race

with a career best of 4:08.5, Phil
Pyatt was second with the same
time, and Bill Bolster finished
third with 4:10.1 another career
best.
BOBCAT BILL HAVILAND who
upset the Wolverine cross-country
team last fall, placed fourth in
the mile with 4:11.0. And in his
rematch with Michigan's Keith
Brown in the two mile he -finish-
ed second to Brown's 9:05.2, post-
ing a 9:08.5. Also in the two mile,
Wolverine Mike Taylor ran a ca-
reer best of 9:12.4 for third place.
Farmer was pleased with the
performance of his distance run-
ners who he feels are finally
rounding into shape after a long
and disappointing indoor season.
Coach Farmer's pre-meet state-
ment, "we have duality, they have
quantity," was evident throughout
the meet, but particularly in the
field events. The Wolverines took
first in all six field events with-
out any hint of competition from
the Bobcats, but because of a lack
of depth Ohio was able to score
most of their 36 points on second
and third place finishes in these
events.
In the mile relay. the meet's
concluding event, Michigan fielded
three relay teams which finished
one-two-three with the Michigan-
A team of Greg Synhax. Eric
(hvpman. Al D'Aostino, and Kim
PRowe. winninR, the event with a
time of 3:20.5.
Many of the winning times were

. Michigan's next outing is set for
end because of snow and also their tomorrow, when Notre Dame is
lack of indoor facilities with which scheduled to make an appearance
to work out on. on the varsity courts.
Suns trade Moore to Rockets;
Swede vaults to new record
14 The Associated Press
* PHOENIX - The Phoenix Suns traded backup center Otto
Moore to the Houston Rockets yesterday for the No. 4 position i
Monday's first round of the National Basketball Association college
player draft.
Phoenix was approaching the telephonic draft without a first-
round pick, having traded that to Detroit in a deal that brought
Moore to the Suns last April.
Moore, 6-11, is a four-year NBA veteran who averaged 7.6 points,
6.7 rebounds and 20 minutes of playing time for the Suns last seasoi9
* AUSTIN - Kjell Isaksson, the gritty, determined flying Swede,
shattered the world pole vault record yesterday with an effort of 18
feet 1 inch in the 45th Texas relays.
Isaksson, who failed once at the height when he hit the bar on
the way up, cleared the bar comfortably on his second jump. The
Memorial Stadium crowd of 18,500 fans roared lustily as Isaksson
leaped for joy and hugged nearby spectators.*
The old standard of 18-01/4 was established by Chris Papanicolaou
of Greece in 1970.
Isaksson also is the world indoor record holder at 17-101/2.
O MOSCOW - Roland Mathes of East Germany, twice Olym-
pic champion in the 100-meter .jackstroke swim, bettered his own
world record yesterday with a time of 56.6 seconds.
The clocking was one-tenth of a second less than his previol*
record.

not up to quality competition
standards, but Farmer attributes
this to the fact that to be set to
outside and then be moved inside
again is a big let down and that
he was happy with the overall
spirit his squad showed despite
the conditions.
Defending Ohio's poor perform-
ance Farmer pointed to the con-
cellation of their meet last week-

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