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April 08, 1972 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-08

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Page Eight

THE MICRIGAN DAILY

Safurday,.April 8, 1972

0

THE MICHiGAN DAILY Saturday, April 8, 1972
Page Eight p

ISR REPORT:
Survey shows student drug
use no higher than average

Chinese ping-pong team
to visit U', tour campus

By PAUL RUSKIN
Male college freshmen use il-
legal drugs no more frequently
than do non-students of the same
age - at least according to a re-
cent survey conducted by Lloyd
Johnston of the Institute for So-
cial Research (ISR).
- Furthermore, Johnston found
that among those youths surveyed,
a number of other trends "which
contradict popular belief" also
manifested themselves.
Among these, he named the
"relatively low rate of illegal drug
use while the students were in
high school" and the fact that use
of non-addicting drugs doesn't
seem to lead to crime or low
grades.

The 1,600 participants in the
survey are members of a largerJ
group of 2,200 people who were
chosen randomly from 87 high
schools to participate in a broad,
many-faceted ' study of young
males. The study began in 1966,
when the participants were in the
tenth grade.;
The drug survey, which was
conducted in 1970, a year after,
the students had graduated high
school, was designed to test atti-
tudes toward and usage of alco-
hol and tobacco, both of which
Johnston termed "legal drugs",
and of five "illegal drugs": Mari-
juana, heroin, hallucinogens, bar-
biturates, and amphetamines.
According to the report, 22 per

cent of the respondents said they
had tried an illegal drug at least
one time during high school. Al-
most all of these people had tried
marijuana, although less than two
per cent had used it daily.
Also, 10 per cent of all those
studied had tried amphetamines,
seven per cent hallucinogens, six
per cent barbiturates, and less
than two per cent had used her-
oin. The two legal drugs, alcohol
and tobacco, were used on a regu-
lar basis by 22 per cent and 33 per
cent respectively of the respond-
ents.
A year after high school, the
number of users of illegal drugs
jumped substantially to 36 per
cent. The number who used alco-
hol on a regular basis rose to 33
per cent, and use of illegal drugs
besides marijuana increased from
13 per cent to 18 per cent.
Another finding of the study
was that 37 per cent of the college
freshmen experimented with ille-
gal drugs, and that 16 per cent.
had tried illegal drugs other than
marijuana.
According to Johnston, "Over'
two-thirds of the sample said they
strongly disapproved of the regu-
lar use of any of the illegal drugs
except marijuana. Half of the re-
spondents disapprove of the regu-
lar use of marijuana.
Johnston noticed a very high
correlation between the use of all
seven drugs. Fof instance, 62 per
cent of those who used marijuana
regularly also smoked cigarettes
regularly, as opposed to only 32
per cent for those who never used
marijuana.
Johnston admitted that a corre-
lation existed between delinquent
behavior and drug use, but he
claims that most of the individuals
who fit into this category had
manifested delinquent tendencies
in thertenth grade,dbefore they
had started to take drugs.
Thus the study says that "the
more delinquent are considerably
more likely to become users, but
the users do not appear to become
more delinquent." Johnston uses
the same argument to explain the
high correlation between poor high
school grades and drug usage. He
also reports that there was no cor-
relation between poor grades in
college and drug usage.

University officials will be roll-
ing out the red carpet next Sat-
urday as they welcome the Peo-
ple's Republic of China table ten-
nis team to a tour of the campus
and their exhibition game at Cris-
ler Arena.
The 14-member team, ranked as,
the world's best, will breakfast at
the Union, tourthe campus on
foot, and have lunch at Bursley{
Hall during their six hour stay.
The University is the first major
American college to be toured by
the Chinese groups.
Accompanying the team will be
Chinese sports federation officials,
newsmen and interpreters. The
group will, be here from 9:15 a.m.
until 3 p.m., meeting with students
and faculty and touring the cam-
pus, as well as participating in
the Crisler Arena exhibition.
First stop for the Chinese dele-
gation arriving on campus will be
the Union ballroom. They will be
greeted by University officials and
will attend a briefing on American
universities, led by faculty mem-
bers and students.
At 10:15 the group will tour
the central campus on foot before
leaving by bus for the North Cam-
pus, where they will lunch atj
BursleyHall. Following an 11:30
luncheon with the students, the
players will leave for Crisler
Arena.
Chuang Tse-tung, three times
men's singles world tabletennis
champion, leads the 14 players.
Others in the delegation include
Chang Hsieh-lin, the mixed dou-
bles world champion; Li Fu-jung.
three times men's singles world
finalist, and Lin Hui-ching, who
a year ago won the women's world
singles, the women's doubles and
the mixed doubles championship.
UW" E.. 11

Tickets for the exhibition are
priced at $1 for school and Uni-
versity students and $2 for the
general public and are on sale at
the Athletic Administration Office,
1000 S. State St., from 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. daily. They will be on
sale at Crisler Arena on April 15.
* hergs
thru
Class 0f e-

The Tramp returns
Comedian Charlie Chaplin, 82, is greeted by Howard Koch, right, member of the Board of Governors
and Treasurer of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, on his arrival at Los Angeles
International airport yesterday afternoon. Chaplin will receive an honorary Oscar at the Academy
Award Ceremonies this Monday. Next to Chaplin is his wife, Oona.;
FOURTH FRONT OPENS:
N. Viets close in on Saigon
as U.S. continues bombings

FOREST
FIRES BURN
MORE
THAN
TREES

4

I

HI
after

Spring?
Shoppers in a northern Illinois town are nearly blown off the
street 'yesterday as they are dumped on by rain, sleet, snow,
and high winds.

R.

Comparative grocery prices

-

(Continued from Page 1) Long were hit as were other bases.
so often has meant victory or de- Reports on the extent of the
feat for allied units. fighting were fragmentary and
The South Vietnamese earlier possibly censored, although the
had pleaded for heavier air sup- South Vietnamese Command said
port in the area, fearing the larg} 40 enemy troops were killed while
enemy force might be changing ten government soldiers died and
the main thrust of its offensive to 23 were wounded.
the south. In what could be a related ac-
Loc Ninh fell after four days of tion, South Vietnamese and Cam-
furious fighting. In the final bodian troops fought a large ene-
hours, South Vietnamese troops my force just across the Cambo-
called in artillery units in an ef- dian border at Kampong Trach
fort to break up the assault waves. The town has been a traditional
Also, U.S. B52s were summoned way station for movement of
and dropped tons of explosives on North Vietnamese troops and sup-
Communist positions just outside plies into the delta region,
the town. Massive U.S. air strikes launched
The last-ditch effort was not in retaliation for Hanoi's most so-
enough to save the town, but did phisticated and second largest of-
create the opportunity for Amer- fensive of the war have been cen-
ican advisors and South Vietnam- tered in support of the northern
ese troops to flee the besieged front. It wasnot known whether
town. the lower pace of fighting in the
Most observers believe that the north meant the offensive had
loss of An Loc would be a major been stalled or even contained or
psychological victory for the Coin-j whether the enemy was merely
munists. pausing for routine resupply and
To the south of Saigon, the replacement of battle casualties
Vietcong shelled and launched The huge U.S. aerial campaign
ground assaults on 14 towns and is the largest since President Lyn-
South Vietnamese outposts in the don Johnson halted the bombing
Mekong Delta region. of the North in 1968 to get peace
The attacks were viewed as the talks off the ground.
opening of a "fourth front" by the The U.S. Command reported two
Communist command. Important Navy jet fighter bombers and a
airfields at Soc Trang and Vinh large rescue helicopter were
Community school to open;
plans innovative programs

This is the third in a series of cons
surveys listing grocery prices around
Prices this week have decreased by .7 per
from last week's samplings.
This survey indicates prices only. T
fore, shopping at the "winning store" doe
guarantee a certain quality or that you wil
exactly what you want.
Rank Store and
Location
All Products
1 Meijers
Packard & Carpenter 100.0 1
2 Wrigley's,
Maple Village 100.8 1
3 Wrigley's,
Wash. & Stadium 101.3 .
4 Great Scott
Carpenter & Packard 101.5 :
5 Vescio,
W. Stadium 102.3 :
6 A&P,
Maple Village 102.4 :
7 A&P,
Stadium & State 102.5 :
8 A&P,
Plymouth Road 102.6 1
9 Wrigley,
Stadium & Liberty 102.8 1
10 A&P,
E. Huron 102.9 1
11 Kroger,
Broadway 105.0 1
12 Kroger,
Arborland 105.1 1
13 Kroger
Packard 105.2 1
14 Kroger
Westgate 105.8 1

downed yesterday.

sumer Congratulations to this week's winners, and
town. to you losers just lower those prices and you
cent
too can be a winner in Foode Pickings.
'here- (Research' for this survey was done by mem-
s not bers of the Public Interest Research Group in
1 find Michigan (PIRGIM) and a group of students in
an introductory economics course.)
PRICE SURVEY WEEK OF APRIL 3, 1972
Lst week's
Meats Staples Dairy Produce Other Rank

Hanoi claimed it's gunners had The Huma
brought down 10 planes on Thurs- has called
day, which if true would be one for this aft
of the heaviest- single daily tolls remaining ;
of the war. The U.S. Command rials still
often delays announcements of A n y o n e
plane losses until after efforts tc should meet
rescue downed pilots. 304 S. Thay4
A fifth U.S. aircraft carrier, the Following
Midway, has been ordered to Viet-
namese waters. A Navy spokesman HRP will h
said the ship will arrive "within beginning a
a month," possibly too late to help office. Eve:
meet the present crisis. urged to b
dinner ther
Panel talks discussiono
R~el RIKS should take
oviolence T
(Continued from Page 1)
of public communications, and $10
Ball-Rokeach argued against it.;
Wiebe noted that what the child FREE D
views is the responsibility of theA
parents. "The individual cannot
ask Congress to intervene so that
they don't have to tell the kids to
turn off the set,' or to watch NEJAI
something else."
Ball-Rokeach says violence is
"a terribly profitable thing," and
that censorship of violence would
probably hurt the industry. Also,
she believes that such censorship
would violate an individual's per-
sonal freedoms.
"I believe in an alternative in-
volving social responsibility with-
out more loss of individual free-
dom," she states.
One further comment was that
removing violence from television
might not be an effective move,
for the effects of alternate pro-
gramming have not been studied.
,I

r cleans
rvictory
an Rights Party (HRP)
a clean-up campaign
ernoon to collect the
HRP campaign mate-
posted around town.
interested in helping
t at the party office,
?r, at 2 p.m.
the clean-up efforts,
host a potluck supper
t 6 p.m. in the HRP
ryone who comes is
ring food. After the
e will be an informal
n what direction HRP
from here.
Stereo Rentals
.00 per month
IO DEPOSIT
ELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
t TV RENTALS
662-5671

1/

-0

100.0
97.0
98.0
97.9
93.7
100.0
100.5
100.3
98.0
100.8
100.8
100.7
100.2
100.8

100.0
98.7
101.1
94.2
102.4
100.0
100.0
101.1
101.1
103.5
98.4
100.2
99.2
99.2

100.0
92.1
95.6
98.7
93.5
88.2
94.5
99.5
91.1
97.7
109.8
104.5
106.4
104.0

100.0
103.4
103.1
103.0
104.5
104.0
102.9

8
3
6
2
9
4
1

102.1 10

103.2
103.2

7
5

(Continued from Page 1)
and job applications.
However, she stresses that CHS
hopes to "get away from the com-
petition of getting of an 'A'"
by creating hetrogenous classroom
groups.
Every student would be respon-
sible for a certain task and then
would be graded according to
their own ability rather than ac-
cording to how they stand in the
group.
Bodley cites adults' "fear of
adolescent maturity" as an ob-
stacle in the educative process and
adds that a "student's individual
progress shouldn't be determined
on the basis of time."
Specifically, Bodley supports the
SUMMER
ROOMS
Singles and Doubles
$30-45
Open Kitchen, Color TV
Theta Xi
1345 Washtenaw
761-6133J

system where students would bel
allowed to take proficiency exami-
nations as a means of qualifying
for advanced placement, provid-
ing, of course, that the student,
parents and teacher-counselor all
agree to such a move.
Public meetings will be held
April 10-13 from 7:30-9:30 p.m. in
the area junior high schools to
discuss the present plans of CHS.
SUMMER
SUBLET
May, June and July
with probable
August & Fall option
2 bedrooms
. semi or unfurnished
" lots of free parking
* laundry facilities
! Rent Negotiable
CALL 665-9870
dinner time & evenings

1

A FEW APARTMENTS STILL AVAILABLE
909 CHURCH

IW

I I- - 7 _--

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1

104.5 12
104.1 11
104.6 14
104.6 13

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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Cli r k' an Dih
OFFICE HOURS
CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLAINTS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
Noon to 4 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS - 764-0557
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
DEADLINE FOR NEXT DAY-12:00 p.m.
DISPLAY ADS - 764-0554
MONDAY-1 1 a.m.-4 p.m.
TUESDAY thru FRI DAY-12 p.m.-4 p.m.

I

SATURDAY, APRIL 8
Day Calendar
Economics Teach-In: Economic Prob-
lems of the Inner City, Aud. A, Angell
Hall, 10:00 a.m. till noon; workshops,
Mason Hall, 1:00-4:30 p.m.; final ses-
sion, Aud. A, Angell Hall, 4:00 p.m.
International Folk Dance: Bulgarian
Folk Dance Workshop, Barbour Gym.,
10:00 a.m.
Gilbert & Sullivan Society: Patience,

_Placement Service
* SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 S.A.B.
INTERVIEW
Classic Crafts Corp., Michigan. Will
interview Wed. and Thurs., April 12
and 13 from 10 to 5. Your opportunity
to make good money and participate in
a management training program. Guar-
anteed salary of $1650 - all expenses
paid. Car a necessity. Further details
contact EPS, phone 763-4117.
INTERVIEW
Camp Maplehurst, Michigan Coed.

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THE CRISIS IN EDUCATION:
IS THERE AN ALTERNATIVE?

I

11

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