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January 20, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-20

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I

MAOR Theater Presents
The Reading of the Play "Cain"
by John Nemerov
Followed by a discussion by Mr. Yaacov Orland,
Israeli playwright, producer, and director, on "Israeli
Theater."
Sat., Jan. 22, 8 p.m. at HILLEL, 1429 Hill
-Admission Free-

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, January 20, 1972

I

y briefs
n e w sby The Aocated Pess

camp ain

sets ii

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on

1217 S. University across from CampusTheater

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"ONE OF THE YEAR'S BEST "
-Bella Abzug -Shirley Chisholm
-Tom O'Horgan -John Simo'n
"MOVEING"
-NEW YORK TIMES
"tTRIMHNT".
It will fascinate and pain you."
Judith Crist, NEW YORK MAGAZINE
What you DON'T know about the Sac-
co and Vanzetti murders will stun you.
The anatomy of the most infamous
trial of the century.

I
STRIKING WEST COAST longshoremen and shippers have
agreed to resume negotiations as soon as possible, Union President
Harry Bridges announced yesterday.
The union leader's announcement came as the White House pre-
pared legislation that would force the strikers back to work.
The renewed strike. by 13,000 dock workers closed 24 Pacific ports
after negotiations ended Monday morning.
HUNDREDS OF CAIRO UNIVERSITY students went on
strike yesterday demanding military training to fight Israel.
"Our people have gotten fed up with the situation in the Middle
East," one student said. "This state of no war, no peace has to come
to an end."
j President Anwar Sadat has named a new prime minister, Azia
Sidky, to replace Mahmoud Fawzi. Sadat said the new govern-
ment would prepare the home front for the battle against Israel.
, But the striking student argued that "preparing the home front
for battle does not come by. changing government but by reorganiz-
ing the people and arming the student militia."
POLICE TEMPORARILY COOLED a growing rebellion in
Spain's biggest university yesterday, but Basque guerrillas waved
a new red flag at the Franco regime by staging another spec-
tacular kidnapping full of political implications.
At Madrid University, torn and virtually closed by two days of
violence, police discouraged a third day of rioting with a strategic
and powerful display of force. But student's vowed to stage the big-
gest demonstration so far early today. ,
More than 250 miles to the north, four men armed with ma-
chine guns kidnapped industrialist Lorenzo Suinaga, 44, near Bilbao
and threatened to kill him Monday unless he reinstated 183 fired
workers.
TWO SOVIET FISHING VESSELS headed southward out of
the North Bering Sea toward Adak, in the Aleutians, under U.S.
escort late yesterday. Efforts to resist arrest for fishing in U.S.
territorial waters were apparently discarded.
The two ships were escorted by the icebreaker Storis. The
Coast Guard Vessel had placed boarding parties on both Soviet ves-
sels, and then had to pursue one and threaten to fire across its bow
in order to halt its escape.
Earlier, the Russians had reportedly proposed that a respon-
sible Soviet official represent the fishing boat captains to avoid
forcing the vessels to undertake the long and time-consuming jour-
ney.
EDMUND MUSKIE (D-Maine), who has already received
numerous major endorsements, added a significant one yester-
day when the American Federation of State, County and Munici-
pal Employes (AFSCME) gave him their nod.
Jerry Wurf, president of the 525,000 member union said, "we've
got to move early" to rally around a candidate and counter frag-
mentation within the Democratic party.

ekxn gNa ionai om iuui i
Effective Congress, Russell Hem-
enway, called the bill "a crucial
first step toward cleansing politics
of the secrecy, duplicity and spe-
cial interest influence which has
sown widespread cynicism and
d rA mnn the A m m ica n

given church
sanctuaries

mlI

Baia eXpe se
WASHINGTON {N} - The most sweeping campaign-
spending reform bill in a half-century cleared Congress yes-
terday to climax a bi-partisan effort to curb campaign costs
and close financial loopholes.
By 334 to 19, the House passed a Senate-approved com-
promise writing new rules for political-finances reporting
and restricting a presidential candidate's radio-TV ad budget
to $8.4 mllion this fall. It is the first such White House cam-
paign-spending ceiling in American history.
Pronouncing "the end of the'-- -
short, unhappy life of the TV
blitz," a leader of the reform-Foes of w ar
coori-,, .in,+..n-.1 I nv.,mH-+OD fnrn lw oii if TT [a

MEMBERS OF THE PAY B
ington to rule on raises under P
nomic program.
Cost Coit
small stor
o WASHINGTON (P) - The Cost
of Living Council yesterday ex-
empted the nation's small retailf
stores and almost half of rental I
housing from President Nixon's
economic controls.
Despite the large coverage, the
council said the exemptions fall
short of decontrol. It claimed
that competition from chain
stores and big landlords would re-!
strain the rise of prices and rents.
As the decision was announced,
the Pay Board failed to reach
agreement on a proposal to ex-
empt the working poor from wage
guidelines. The board rejected as
too low a counciltsuggestion that
those earning up to $1.90 an hour
be exempted from the 5.5 per cent
wage increase standard, sources
said.
The council excused from price
controls all retail firms with an-
nual sales of less than $100,000.
These stores account for about 15
per cent of all retail sales but
make up three-fourths of the two
million retail firms in the nation.
Exempted from rent controls
were about 10 million of the 23.6'
million renter-occupied housing

OARD meet yesterday. in Wash- people." PALO ALTO, Calif. (A) - The
President Nixon's Phase II eco- The bill was sent to President congregations of 14 churches in
Nixon, who is expected to sign it. eight California cities are offer-
In 1970, he vetoed a bill to limit ing sanctuary - including hot
election spending for radio and meals and sleeping bags - to sol-
Itsh aTV - saying it plugged "only one diers and sailors who don't want
f i l hole in a sieve." to go to war.
The current measure includes The Presbyterian, Quaker, Ro-
!brodcasting, newspasr, magaesman Catholic and Lutheran con-
e C i ro Is bn and outdoor advertising plus gregations belong to the "Sanc-
paid-telephone campaigns. Phon- tober after nine protesters in a
units. ing by volunteerswould not be San Diego Catholic church re-
The council specifically exempt- charged to a candidate, and post- fused to sail to Vietnam on the
ed from rent controls single-fam- aircraft carrier Constellation. They
ily rental homes rented for long- The bill sets a formula limiting later were taken back to the ship.
er than month-to-month periods what federal office-seekers can Clergymen who formed the
where the landlord owns four or spend on these items - an all- Sanctuary Caucus say they will
fewer housing units, owner-occu- media spending ceiling of 10 cents not block arrests nor hide the
pied dwellings of - four or fewer per potential voter, with no more fact that men are inside.
units having longer than a month- than six cents of each dime going But they believe by throwing an
to-month rental agreement and for broadcasting ads. entire congregation's support be-
apartment units renting for $500 If signed by the President, the hindantiwar servicemen they can
a month or more. bill would be effective in 60 days- demonstrate widespread public op-
The combined affect of exempt- thus missing early primaries such position to the war.
ing these three types of housing as New Hampshire and Florida. Latest to take sanctuary is a
means that about 45 per cent of former high school football play-
all rental housing will not be cov- The compromise came after the er from a Detroit suburb who has
ered by rent controls, the council Senate yielded on a provision that camped alongside his parents in
;aid would have cleared the way for sleeping bags between the pews of
Donald Rumsfeld, council chair- radio-TV debates by major presi- the First Presbyterian church in
man, said the exemptions do not dential contenders this year. The Palo Alto since Monday night. He
mean the administration is ready House insisted on retaining the is the only serviceman currently in
for widespread dismantling of Nix- so-called equal-time law, which re- sanctuary here.
on's wage-price controls. quires broadcasters to provide --i-----___t____
The entexemtios wil eim-equal air time for all candidates The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
The rent exemptions will elim- u raged by students at the University of
inate much of the red tape that for the same political office if they Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
has accompanied the control pro-C give it to one. class postage. paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
gram, the council said. The Price Furthermore, the Senate gave Michigan 4804. Published dAnn ATes
Commission adopted rent regula- up its idea of creating an inde- day through Sunday morning Univer-
tions in December prohibiting sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
rents from rising by more than pendent federal elections commis- carrier, $11 by mail.
2.5 per cent unless justified by in- sion to oversee compliance with roughSaturday morning. Subscrip-
creased taxes. the campaign laws. tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

:..

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I

FF

MICHIGAN UNION BILLIARDS

I.

;ER

FREE INSTRUCTION
THURS., JAN. 27th
7-9 p.m.

PLAY POOL 1/2 PRICE
All this week
thru Saturday

I

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9-12 TONITE
Thursday, Jan. 20
Music by MANCHILD
Free Refreshments
LAWYERS' CLUB
551 S. STATE

OPEN 10 A.M. MON.-SAT., 1 P.M. SUN.

I

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r

WCPICTURES Gts GIAN MARIA VOLONTE . RICCARDO CUCCIOLLA . CYRIL CUSACK
ROSANNA FRATELLO * GEOFFREY KEEN .; MILO O'SHEA i.mu...IooRE-
. SACCO & VANZETTI . WILLIAM PRINCE . CLAUDE MANN uo..'. by FABRIZIOONOFRI
e., GIULIANO MONTALO -Thm Sng Sung, by JOAN BAEZ w,you-,m.. .JOAN BAEZ ..e £ENNIO MORRMCNE
e..e or HARRY COLOMBO .. GEORGE PAPI -* , tyGIULIANO MONTALDO fSG A 1n.tr i i i
® ETCINICOLORZX tl .byUMC PICTURES-.. w o UN4* a. M ION CORP.P I C..~ A w612......

O 0 PTH For'um
PFIFT AVENUE AT LIBERTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 7681-9700

SHOWS 7 & 9
FRI. 7-9- 11

KOSI-ER KGPOP
New Winter Prices!!
$155/semester
Individual meals (note reduction)
$1 .75/meal-Fri. and Sat.
$2.25/meal-other days
All meals served atille-i-1429 Hill
Reservations must be'made by noon on day of meal
INFORMATION and RESERVATIONS: 663-4129

4

'f-)

SALE ON!
SAIL ON!

COMMANDER CODY and his Lost Planet Airmen will
make their only Detroit area appearance on this tour this
Sunday, Jan. 23 at Hill Auditorium. Tickets on sale now
thru Sat. at Mich. Union noon-6 p.m. and both Salvation
Record Stores. $1-$1.50-$2-$2.50. Also appearing will be
Buddies In The Saddle and The Boogie Brothers (Steve
and John)

i
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2 PERFORMANCESI-FRI. and SAT.

OBIS
nmonr~n

JACK
A B"fl MI A M

FRI.
& SAT.
JAN.

.INI121 au Ruu au u- .-------- --_

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