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April 05, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Paige Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, April 5, .1972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, April 5, 1972
.3'

NSN MED. FRAT.
1912 GEDDES
(across from the Arb)
Thursday, April 6-8:30-12
Live Bond-Draft Beer
Females Free-Males $2.00

Lamble

rambles ahead

n
n search of

PRESCRIPTION EYEWARE
and SHADES

By BOB HEUER
As a four-year veteran of the
Wolverine lacrosse team, senior
midfielder Dan Lamble's
achievements h a v e mirrored
those of the sport itself on
Michigan's campus. By his own
admission, neither Lamble nor
the Michigan Lacrosse Club had
impressive credentials when he
arrived on the scene in 1968.
Now in his senior year, Lam-
ble leads a Michigan club that
has reached the top of the heap
in Midwest club lacrosse. "The
program has come a long way in
those four years," says an en-
thusiastic Lamble. "When I got
here there wasn't too much in-
terest."
Lamble's only exposure to the
game had been attendance as a
spectator at a lacrosse league in
Detroit. "I had played football
in high school, but never
thought I had the size to make
it at the Big Ten level, says

the 5-8, 180 lb. sparkplug.
After coming to Michigan,
Lamble was introduced to par-
ticipation in the sport and im-
mediately fell in love with it.
Lacrosse had a lot to offer to a
player with the background and
athletic ability of a player like
Dan Lamble. The game com-
bines the footwork and hitting
of football with the finesse and
team play of hockey. Lamble ex-
celled at both sports and still

plays
spare
The
crosse
as a
"The
here
club."
makes
of fun

hockey in much of his
time.
big selling point for la-
to Lamble was its format
club sport at Michigan.
team is run informally
due to its status as a
says Lamble, "but that
it an incredible amount
to play."

uccess
games and practice.
Along with the advantages of
playing at the club level, Lam-
ble points out some of the limi-
tations of the club. When
you're playing as a club, you're
always facing problems of guys
not coming to practice and not
always hustling," he said, "but
when you can have the kind of
attitude where the guys are
hustling and putting out on
their own, it's really incredible.
We had that attitude here last
year, and I think we're starting
to get it back now."
This is not to say that the
Wolverine stickmen will cake-
walk through the remainder of
their schedule. There are no
pushovers, least of all, today's
encounter with Michigan State
in East Lansing. The Spartans
lost ground when they went
varsity three years ago, but they
are a tremendously improved
team and, according to coach
Bob Kaman, "would like noth-
ing better than to beat Michi-
gan."

Lamble now anchors one of
Michigan's midfields, and as a
tri-captain, takes a big 'role
in team leadership in both

- -9

-Associated Press
THE TV BROADCASTING CREW for the Boston Red Sox set about learning their new summer job in
empty Fenway Park in Boston. The pair was scheduled to start their telecasting season tomorrow
when the Sox were to entertain the Bengals from Motown, but it looks like that contest may not
get underway on time unless the players and owners pull a fast one out of the hat.

61 (.U. mM
662 5903.

I

This Week in Sports
TODAY
LACROSSE-at Michigan State
FRIDAY
BASEBALL-Detroit (2), Fisher Stadium, 2:00 p.m.
TENNIS-Minnesota, here, 2:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
BASEBALL--Eastern Michigan (2), Fisher Stadium, 1:00 p.m.
TENNIS-Iowa, here, 1:00 p.m.
TRACK-Ohio University, outdoor track, 1:30 p.m.
LACROSSE-at Cincinnati
RUGBY--at Miami of Ohio
7 ~Die Dre~i
Groschenoper
Trueblood Auditorium
r 8 P.M. -April 6, 1, 8
TICKETS $2.50 ($2.00 for students)
Tickets available at Box Office daily 9-4 and
6-8 on nights of performance.
Presented by the U-M Dept. of
Germanic Languages and Literature

Reds cancel season

opener

STRIKE CONTINUES:

By The Associated Press
CINCINNATI - The Cincinnati
Reds, seeing no sign of a break
in the major league baseball play-
er strike, postponed their 1972
National League opening game to-
day against the Houston Astros.
More than 51.000 fans had been
expected this afternoon for what
always had been a noisy, gala
event.

ed to realize postponement was in
the cards. There was little reac-
tion to the announcement by
Francis L. Dale, the Reds' presi-
dent.
No one would venture an esti-
mate of the losses to the Reds, to
the players or to concessionaires.
Dale said the club itself was "will-
ing" to take its share in withered
gate receipts.

Even the most avid fan appear- Pitcher Jim Merritt, Reds'
.:::::::::: ::: player representative, said Mar-
! I ..I. . vin Miller, executive director of

Villboard

Tickets for the April 15th
Chinese - American Table Ten-
nis Exhibition go on sale to-
day at the Michigan Ticket
Dept.aTickets for this Crisler
Arena event are $2 for adults
and $1 for students.

I I

____
I
..
E

For the Student Body:
LEVI'S
Corduroy
Bells
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

the players association, would be
in CincinnatiTuesday night for
a meeting with the Reds' players.
The Reds' front office said date
and details of an opening game
would be announced after the
strike ends. Under the original
schedule Cincinnati would have
been on the road after Wednes-
day's opener until April 10.
No decision was announced on
CUT YOUR MONTHLY
L l/V/NG EXPENSES
HOW ELL
. No Entrance Fee
" Low Lot Rental Rates
" Model Clearance Sale
* Easy Finance Terms
Michigan's Largest Network of
Mobile Home Communities
546-6400 PARK
5406000 .SALES
1-96 & PINCKNEY RD. EXIT

the tickets held by fans for the til the season opens.
season opener. Other National League clubs
Some of Cincinnati's on-strike weren't scheduled to open until
players worked out yesterday on tomorrow.
the artificial turf at the Univer- Mert.adh adsm te
sity of. Cincinnati' s football player dra salaresm on a1
dium. paesda aaiso 0
Most players will be off the month basis. They have been paid
Cincinnati and Houston payrolls since Feb. 1. The Reds refused to
beginning today. Regular season say if such players would be asked
salaries normally don't begin un- to refund pay already received.
Rangers, Hawks head stars;
Dawson inks new contract
By The Associated Press
" MONTREAL - The Chicago Black Hawks and New York
Rangers dominated the 1971-72 NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE ALL-
STAR TEAMS selected by The Hockey News.
The weekly publication, in a vote of fans, placed left wiig Bobby
Hull, goalie Tony Esposito and defensemen Pat Stapleton and Bill
White, all of the Black Hawks, on the West Division team.
Bobby Clarke of Philadelphia, a center, and. Bill Goldsworthy of
Minnesota, a right wing, also were named to the squad.
Defenseman Brad Park, left wing Vic Hadfield and right wing
Rod Gilbert of the Rangers were named to the East Division team
along with defenseman Bobby Orr and Center Phil Esposito of Boston
and goalie Ken Dryden of Montreal.
Orr was selected the most valuable player and Rick Martin of
Buffalo, a forward, was voted rookie of the year.
* KANSAS CITY - Quarterback Len Dawson signed a new two-
year contract with the Kansas City Chiefs yesterday, ending specu-
lation that the 15-year pro football veteran might retire.
Terms of the contract were not disclosed, but it was believed
Dawson's new salary would put him in the $100,000-a-year bracket.
f NEW YORK - The NEW YORK YANKEES announced yes-
terday that Thursday's scheduled opening baseball game against the
Baltimore Orioles has been postponed out of respect for Gil Hodges,
the New York Mets' manager who will be buried Thursday.
If the players' strike is settled, the Yankees will open against
Baltimore Friday afternoon.
0 VANCOUVER, B.C. - THOMAS SCALLEN and LYMAN WAL-
TERS, top management of the Vancouver Canucks were remanded
without pleas yesterday when they appeared in Provincial Court
charged with theft of about $3 million from the National League
Hockey League club's corporate organization.
Judge Larry Eckart set July 17 as the date for the start of the
trial unless application is made before April 17 to set a new trial
date.

1

REVISED TIMETABLE FOR

SPRING FLING
Coming this weekend
Friday, April 7th
12-1 p.m.-Band on Regents Plaza, refreshments
Saturday, April 8th
3 p.m. 'til dusk-"Love's Alchemy"
"Leaves of Grass"
Street Dance on East University
between Dental Bldg. and Virich's
Sunday, April 9th
1 p.m.-4 p.m.-Kite flying and Frisbee contest-

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"A DAZZLING MUSICAL FILM
- 'Cabaret' has come to the
screen with even greater effect
than when it made its mile-
stone mark on Broadway.
'Cabaret'rsucceeds -as no
other derived film musicals
have-in bridging the gap
between the realities of the
camera and the illusions of the
stage. The result is far more
than a film 'version' of the
musical. It is a vivid drama with
music, a compassionate story
of people trapped by their own

"'Cabaret' is a brilliant piece of work,
a triumph, the movie musical by which
other movie musicals must now be
judged! Movie audiences have much
to be grateful for in 'Cabaret.' Sum-
med up and stated inageneralities,they
can be grateful for an absolutely su-
perlative introduction to the thinking
man's musical."
- Susan Stark, Detroit Free Press
"A GREAT MOVIE MUSICAL!
Liza Minnelli's Sally Bowles is
one of those once in a lifetime

"'CABARET' GLOWS! TRULY
MEMORABLE! AN UNUSU-
ALLY SUCCESSFUL AND
BRILLIANT TRANSLATION OF
A STAGE MUSICAL TO THE
SCREEN! A perfect achieve-
ment in everything it attempts.
For this thanks must go to di-
rector Bob Fosse's perfection-
ism in reproducing the feel, the
sounds, the looks, the people
of Berlin. It's in a class by itself,

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