100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 04, 1972 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday. April 4, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. . . . . . . . . ... .
A NEW, MULTI-NATIONAL, PROBLEM
ORIENTED HISTORY COURSE
i1 Compaative sudies
IIi
in Hstorical Cutu res
HISTORY 103-104 MWF 9:00'
TOPICS: Fall-industrialization and Modernization
'Winier-Religion and Politics
Pick-up detailed description sheets at the History Department, 3601 Haven Hall
or the Freshman-Sophomore Counseling Office, 1213 Angell Hall. Register now
or next fall
.....2"', 2 -,.c'

ITT charge Tight race in Wisconsin
Continuei from Pagez1 movement", and that a sec
as McGovern and Lindsay. place finsh today will do
a e dAt a press conference yesterday, that.
(r.n inI r frn Paw 11 ,. ... ..a i . - ,_

Page Seven
The Secret Service:
Perils of the primary

ond
just

eindsay said he was running for
day contradicted McGovern's the Democratic presidential nomi-!
charge that ITT paid no federal nation "on the basis of a message
income taxes for the past three that has to be told."
years. The "message" ref rred to his,
"committment to the basic rights
McGovern, campaigning in Wis- of man."
consin presidential primary yes- McGovern has been riding high;
terday, stuck to his assertion. in Wisconsin. His organization has
His clarifying statement said the been widely described as the best
SEC documents "indicate that at -bolstered by hundreds of stu-
least for the taxable years of 1968, dent volunteers and headed by
1969 and 1970, the corporation as political pro - Frank Menkie-
a whole was in a net nonpayment woitz, former campaign manager
situation with respect to federal for Robert Kennedy.
corporate income taxes." While McGovern is strong
An ITTrspokesman said In New among youth a main thrust of his
York yesterday that the corpora- campaign has been an attempt to
broaden his base of support. He.
tion, involved in a Senate inquiry has been campaigning hard in:
over the convention contribution. working class areas, on construe-
had paid t.S. Income taxes in tion sites and anywhere else he
those three years. thinks he can reach workers.v

IN CELEBRATION OF
ISRAELI
INDEPENDENCE

,
a
i
I

DAY

THE HON.
YITZHAK
RABIN
ISRAELI AMBASSADOR
TO THE UNITED STATES
Introduced By:
Dean William Haber
"The Situation in the

The ITT spokesman said that in
1971, the corporation paid more
than $207 million in income taxes,
about one-third of the total in
federal taxes. Financial statements
on file at the SEC supported the:
ITT figures.
But at a news conference in!
Madison yesterday, McGovern saidI
that some of the ITT subsidiaries
paid taxes, but because of losses of
other subsidiaries, "the net flow.
was not from ITT to the govern-
ment, but the other way around.I
"ITT as a conglomerate has notj
paid taxes to the federal govern-E
ment," he said.
V.I.P. DISCOUNT
213 S. STATE
COUPON-
16 o:.
WOOLITE
99c
Limit 1 Expires 4/17/72
-. ---.- ----.--
COUPON
200--2 Pty
Swanee Tissue
19c
Limit 2 Expires 4/17/72
COUPON
Ivory Soap
PERSONAL SIZE
4/36c
Limit 8 Expires 4/17/72
- - .. - . .. ---
COUPON
Req. 4.93
SHY
FEMININE SYRINGE
$3.39

Also very uncertain is McGov-
ern's strength among the blacks.
Although he has been endorsed by
Rev. Jesse Jackson. head of Peo-
ple United to Save Humanity and
Hosea Williams of the Southern,
Christian Leadership Conference,
his reception in Milwaukee's 90.-
000 black "core city" residents has
ranged from cool to hostile.
The reason for this perhaps is
McGovern's coil rights rcord,
which lacks brilliance in compari-
son with Humphrey.
Humphrey, meanwhile. has been
campaigning like the old oro that
he is. Hopping around the state
in his jet in search of sunnort he
frequently puts in 12 to 18 hours
a day of feverish stumnin.
His pace is frenetic. On one
twenty-minute flioht from Mil-
waukee to Madison, an Pide ad-
mitted that the twin enrine jet
campaign plane would not v-t the
senator to his destination, any
faster than an automobile but was
used because "it gives us a sense
of speed."
The Minnesota s--tor seems
however to be concding a first-
place finish to McGovern. He
claims that his camnaimn stratev
is to provide a "stady forward

Humphrey is campaigning pri-
marily on his record as a senator.
Calling himself'"Mr. Civil Rights"
he has spent fully four times the
energy and time in the state's mi-
nority communities as has Mc-
Govern. He emphasized that he
has constantly voted for tax re-
form and aid to the elderly,
Much of Humphrey's support is'
coming from labor, minorities and
the elderly. Many blacks especially
may vote for him as a representa-
tive of the old Democratic party.
As for the party's erstwhile for-
mer frontrunner, Sen. Edmund
Muskie of :Maine, there are indi-
cations that he is on the verge of
disaster in today's primary.
The burden of being the leader
of the pack has been alleviated,
yet' after 'months of campaigning,j
Muskie Gives the impression that
he is merely going through the
motions.
According to various polls, he
will finish as low as thfird or
fourth - and his recent cam-
paigning does not seem to have
altered this dire prediction.
It is unclear, for example, whe-
ther Muskie has successfully elim-
inated in Wisconsin his reputationl
of being va-ue about the issues.
He has made a concerted effort
here, however, to offer specific
pronosals in his jaunts around the
state.
Further down the list of candi-
dates. Wallace may draw a good
percentage of the uncommitted
vote due to the fact that many
p-onVl are unwilling to admit sun-
nort for the Alabama governor. He
mpy finish as high as third in the
primary.
Lindsay. despite the optimism of
his private poll. cannot realistic-
ally - expect to receive a sizable
percantage of the vote. He has
ben emnaigning for crossover
vnts. hut has nowhere near the
oroeni7tien of the other major
cgndidates. 'Vuch of his liberal
support has been drained off by
McGovern.

t
;
,
A
j
l
1
1

'1
.J
=i

bor residents. However, in the I
event of multiple requests and a!
shortage of funds, students will
probably receive priority over non-
students, according to organizers.
The fund also does not have
enoucrh money to presently handle
felony cases, said one organizer.
Two criteria are considered in
vranting bail. orfxanizers say.
The bail set bail can not exceed
$150.00 and the nerson requesting
the money must be reasonably bP-
lieovd not likely to cause bond to
be forfeited.

out as much as a glance at a press
card, the only requirement being
that the reporter write his name
and the name of his sponsoring
organization on a sheet of paper.
The foreign object Which is
found in each Serviceman's ear is
not a hearing aid. It's an ear-
phone, connected to a wire which
travels down his sleeve to con-
nect with a two-way radio at his
wrist.
It is not at all uncommon to be
sitting on a press bus, and watch
with amazement as a man who

1g 111, el Wall d uegn UU
ject inhisrightearanan - After Sen. Robert Kennedy was
ject in his right ear and an om- assassinated during the 1968 pres-
inous bulge under his left shoulder inted duinge1s8ped
__ idential campaign, Congress passed
an act providing Secret Service
protection for all presidential can-.
Ldidates. These men protect all the
1972 candidates, except New York
Mayor John Lindsay who refused
7fttds set / the Service men, from crazed re-
t f 'E w porters and angry housewives.
But Secret Service officials do
By MARTIN STERN not allocate their best agents for
Imagine that you have been this kind of duty, The agents
busted for a misdemeanor and working the presidential campaign
have been taken to the county trail arereceiving their first on-
jail. The judge sets bail but you're the-job training under conditions
broke and can't pay. they are likely to face at the
Two local bail funds - the White House.
Student Government Council Bail The Secret Service provides
Fund and the People's Defense press clearance for any reporter
Community Bail Fund - have' wishing to ride a candidate's press
been set up to help provide bail bus or attend a candidate's press
for persons arrested on misde- conferences.
meanors who are unable to put up But it is questionable at best
bail. whether they perform any real
SGC has $750.000 for the fund service in this capacity. Press cre-
which is available to all Ann Ar- dentials generally are issued with-

By GENE ROBINSON
special To The Daily
MILWAUKEE - Surrounding
all but one of the presidential
candidates sweeping through the
state are several innocuous look-
ing men_ ac~h with afnrpe nh-

These men have neither ear
trouble nor swollen glands. The
green, white and black triangular
badge each wears on the left la-
pel identifies him as agent of the
U.S. Secret Service.

i
I
I
i
I
i

I

1

Arlene Griffin. on° of the pro- looks like no one in particular
ioct's roani ers. said that only a talks to his shirtsleeve.
fw .,evsons have used the service The Servicemen look as if they
Sh attributes this to lack of pub- were all poured from the same
licity. mold. They all have short hair,
Th0 Pople's Defonse Committee and wear black, blue or gray suits
Rail Piw'd. a community oraani7- and white shirts. And the only
tion nrovirnis air to all local rpi- words one ever hears from them
dntC. and oner'-s much the are "No," or "You can't go in
spme aC the SCC fund. there."
The ohon prmher for the SGC The most reassuring thing an
Rail Fund is 7rQ-6-4O To contact agent can say after scrutinizing
the Pnre' T'ne~fnse committee one's Secret Service Security clear-
fl- number to call is 485-3222. ance card is "Okay, you're clean"
I-

Middle

East:

Prospects for Peace'
ADMISSION FREE

t!

STOP
"FOR BIG,
MUFFLER
VALUES!
FREE
Installation in Minutes

8 P.M.-MONDAY, April 10

Michigan Union Ballroom

7:00 P.M.-"ISRAEL NOW" Information on programs in Israel:

KIBBUTZ UN
JOBS TOURS

IVERSITI ES ARCHAEOLOGY
HEBREW LANGUAGE (ULPAN)

Israeli Resource Personnel in all areas will answer all questions
SHULI NATAN
Known for her versionJ
of "Jerusalem of Gold"'
Returning after Shalom '72. S
t CONCERT, with the melodious folk-songs of r.'
Israel. Followed by ISRAELI DANCING . . . theh
audience is invited to join in the dancing.'
8 P.M.-SATURDAY, April 8
Mich. Union Ballroom

WRITTEN
For as long as
GuaranteeI
Coast1

ADMISSIONI

FR'EE

1

Limit I Expires 4/17/72
COUPON
20 oz.
Listerine
$1.06
Limit 1 Expires 4/17/72

GUARANTEE
you own your car.
honored from
to Coast.
ALSO
" Springs
" Shocks
" Brakes
* Free Installation

I

SAVE
UP
TO
$60
ON
NEW
'71 Toyotas
Full Factory
Warranty
ONLY 10 LEFT
TOYOTA
ANN ARBOR
Open Mon. & Thurs. t9
907 N. MA I N 663-8567

I

HEAVY DUTY STEERINQ
AND SUSPENSION PARTS
" BaTl Joints
a Idler Arms
" Tie Rod Ends

I

I;

FLARES
Your
Choice
$5
reg. to $24

ANN M n
ARBORIIUflrIsals

V.I.P. DISCOUNT
213 S. STATE
Sun Tan Lotions
Sun Tan Creams
Sun Tan Oils
at
Discount Prices

.r . ...

-

1 ""

2333 Jackson Rd.

Phone 769-5914

The University of Michigan
HOUSING OFFICE
HOUSING REAPPLICATiON PROCEDURES FOR

Drive In for Free Exhaust System Inspection

FALL-WIN TER

1972-73 ASSIGNMENTS

(Bush and Gomberg Houses in South Quad and the 3500 Corridor of Stockwell)
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Residence Hall Reapplication Process for Bush and Gomberg Houses of South Quad and the 3500 Cor-
ridor of Stockwell will take place between 5:00 and 9:00 p.m. on April 5, 1972, at the Housing Information
Office, 1011 Student Activities Building.
PLEASE NOTE:
ANY RESIDENT MAY REAPPLY FOR A SPACE IN BUSH AND GOMBERG HOUSES OF SOUTH QUAD AND
THE 3500 CORRIDOR OF STOCKWELL.
1. Residents who have reapplied. or cancelled their residence hall accommodations for the 1972-73
academic year still may reapply for the above spaces in accordance with the established reappli-
cation schedule.
2. Reapplication Schedule-April 5, 1972, 5:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
Students who wish to make a choice of facilities.in Bush and Gomberg Houses in South Quad and
the 3500 Corridor of Stockwell for the 1972-73 academic year will make their selection in accord-
ance with the following schedule:

1974 COULD
FIND YOU JUSTr
ANOTHER.
COLLEGE GRAD
OR A JR EXE C IN
if you're a young man or woman with 2 academic years remaining either at
the undergraduate or graduate level, you can apply for entry in the Air Force's
2-year ROTC program, offered on college campuses all across the country. If you
qualify, you'll receive a $100 a month, nontaxable subsistence allowance. And on
graduating, you'll receive an officer's commission in the Air Force. Also, this year,
for the frst time, the Air Force ismoffering hundreds of scholarships in the Air Force
ROTC 2-year program paying full tuition; lab expenses; incidental fees; a text-
book allowance and the same $100 each month, tax free.
For more information, m ,i in r on t,day , , call 764-2403 toll free.*
Enroll in the Air Force ROTC, and get your future of tthe ground. Call 764-
2403.
RF--------------------------------~~------ ----~---I
I AIR FORC FRFLRlI ITVPG SPRV\ -R ± . l. 2-NR-42

CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty
V.I.P. DISCOUNT
THIS WEEK'S SPECIALS
t 7O's
Q-TIPS
83c
6.75
PEPSODEN T
TOOTHPASTE
66c
16 oz
PHI-SO-HEX
$1.99
16 oz
LIQUID PRELL
$1.44

{
,
I

(a) Remain in present room
(b) Remain in present house
(c) Choice of roommates. (Students may request a roommate for the
Fall Term who is not presently enrolled in the University. If the student
the space is being reserved for has not submitted a housing application by
May 31, 1972, he waives all priority for assignment.)
(d) Move to another house;/building because of rescheduled usage of
present room/'house/.or building.
(e) Move toranother house withingthe same building
(f) Move to another hall individually
(a) Move to a different residence hall with chosen roommate (s)

5:00-5:45 p.m.
5:45-6:30 p.m.
6:30-7:15 p.m.

7:15-7:30 p.m.

7:30-8:15 p.m.
8:15-8:45 p.m.
8:45-9:00 p.m.

3

I

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan