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January 19, 1972 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-19

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, January 19, 1972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, January 19, 1972

Women anti-war demonstrators
evicted from House galleries

Students open center
to promote action on
consumer complaints

WASHINGTON VP) - SeveralIdate for U.S. withdrawal from In-

hundred women, supporting cen-
sure of President Nixon, demon-
strated in the House galleries un-
til they were evicted yesterday and
then left their protest banners
pinned to the White House fence.
The demonstrating began with
ripples of applause when Rep.
Bella Abzug, (D-N.Y.), offered her
resolution on the House floor to
censure Nixon for not setting a

dochina.
After three other House mem-
bers had spoken in support of the
censure resolution, the women
brought out a broadside of forbid-
den signs that ringed the galleries.
There was little sound from the
well-dressed, matronly crowd ex-
cept the rustling of paper banners.
Speaker Carl Albert (D-Okla.),
who had been warning all along
that demonstrations were not al-,

lowed directed doorkeepers to sive bombing of Laos and Cam-
clear the galleries. bodia. He has not negotiated in
Abzug said Nixon "has proceed- good faith in Paris."

ed to flout both the intent and
the language" of a 1971 law de-
claring it the policy of the United
States that a withdrawal date be
set.
Instead, Abzug charged, Nixon
has "escalated the mass bombing
of North Vietnam, choosing to do
so while Congress was in recess,
and now he is continuing the mas-

Student government members quit,
clash with school administration

(Continued from Page 1)
suggestions would be "looked in-
to." The proposals were later re-
jected in a meeting between ad-
ministrators and department chair-
men, a meeting to which the
Student Council was not even in-
vited, according to Ergueta.
Meyers. on the other hand, says
he does pay attention to student
views. "Whenever possible, I be-
lieve I have tried to listen to their
point of view and incorporate it
into the operations of the school.
I'm the first to say, though, that
I have not accepted all of their
points of view."
Meyers pointed out that an in-
creased number of options have
been offered to students during un-
scheduled periods as well as in-
creased passing time between
classes. He cited these as two ex-
amples of the administration lend-
ing an ear to students and doing
something about it.
But Ergueta also remembers

well the case of the increased pass-
ing time between classes, and it
constitutes another case of ad-
ministrative disregard for student
views. The proposal for increased
passing time, he said, came from
the faculty after racial disturb-
ances at Huron this fall. Though
the Student Council supported the
change, it had no role in the nego-
tiations between the faculty and
administration that resulted in the
change.
The administration would have
gone ahead with the change re-
gardless of the opinions of the Stu-
dent Council, Ergueta says. "The
students just aren't involved in
the decision-making piocess," Er-
gueta says.
In an official statement accom-
panying the resignations, the Stu-
dent Council said, "Real change
in the past few years has come
only when students willfully broke
school rules and forced conces-
sions from the administration. .

This manner of effecting change
by responding only to crisis situa-
tions is unnatural and ultimately
self-destructive."
Ergueta and the council feels
that the administration has not
given them the chance to bring
about change through peaceful
means.
The assistant principal, Albert
E. Gallup, agreed that the Student
Council has been ineffectual, but
was "sorry that they've decided
to resign ... You have to hang in
there and try to improve it."
Ergueta's bitterness is also very
much directed at the student body.
The Council, in its official state-
ment, complained that the students
show no interest in school affairs,
and, according to the council's
vice president, Nick Keresztesi,
the Council often had difficulty
attaining a quorum in the past.
"Students are just so self-cen-
tered, it's unbelievable," Ergueta
said.
While Keresztesi hopes to organ-
ize a mass-based student union at

Albert ordered the galleries in
which the visitors were seated to
be cleared when they continued
and hoisted their signs.
After the demonstration, Rep.
Robert L. F. Sikes (D-Fla), de-
nounced the demonstrators and
said their action "flaunts the tra-
dition and dignity of the House
and is an insult to the constitu-
tional process."
Reps. William F. Ryan (D-N.Y.),
Paren J. Mitchell (D-Md.), and
Edward I. Koch (D-N.Y.), fol-
lowed with speeches in support of
the resolution
"The President is not above the
law," Mitchell said, "The separa-
tion of powers means equal shar-
ing of responsibility and the House
has a responsibility as the body
closest to the people."
After the women in the galleries
were evicted, they moved to the
front steps of the House wing and
staged a rally denouncing Nixon,
the war and high prices.
Women's unit
hits file study
(Continued from Page 1)
"First, the supervisors were very
conservative and afraid in making
their recommendations."
Secondly, "supervisors didn't
have the material to judge salary
equity across the University." The'
review specifically requested rec-
ommendations be made based up-
on comparisons made within the
department.
Lastly, Zumeta says, the lowj

ORGANIZERS of the new Consumer Action Center respond to
their first calls on consumer affairs.
CITY APPROVES
Davids hits police p lan

By LYNN SHEEHAN
A Consumer Action Center, fi-
nanced primarily by local busi-
nesses, opened this week with the
aim of fielding consumer com-
plaints against local merchants...
The Center, at 115'/2 E. Liberty,
plans to provide personalized at-
tention to all complaints, and
hopes to iron out disputes be-
tween citizens and merchants in
order to create a better business
atmosphere in the city.
Manned by a group of five
University students, the center
operates with contributions from
local banks, including the Ann
Arbor Bank and the Huron Valley
Bank,,car dealers and local mer-
chants. It operates through the
office of the Chamber of Com-
merce Consumer Affairs Com-
mittee.
Although the Center does not
control the merchants' monetary
pledges, "we do have a pledge of
autonomy from the Chamber of
Commerce," commented Bill Bail-
ey, one of the center's organizers.
The Center members plan,
through compiling statistics and
records, to study the nature of
consumer problems in Ann Arbor,
and serve as a resource center forf
this information.

"Our power is that if we get a
pattern of complaints, we might
be able to push for action from
the Chamber of Commerce," Bail-
ey said.
Although the Center will not
provide legal advice, it will be
prepared to act as a mediator
between a business and a com-
plainant, or refer an individual to
another organization that could
better solve the problem.
The Center has received over
two dozen complaints since its
opening Monday. These com-
plaints have ranged from motor-
cycle and car repairs to a drape
damaged by a cleaner, to a com-
plaint against a dentist.
A car dealer, against whom a
complaint of an overpriced bat-
tery was registered, is a financial
contributor to the Center.
A Chamber of Commerce
spokesman said that local mer-
chants re-acted positively to the
idea of the Center.
"The Chamber of Commerce
was unable to handle individual
complaints effectively," he said.
"We hope the Center will do a
better job," he added

'4

(Continued from Page 1)
budget squeeze in recent years,
they have applied pressure on the
legislators to either change the
arrangement between the Univer-
sity and the AAPD or to start
compensating them for similar
services.
The state ordered the university
to devise a new plan for provid-
ing protection. For a short time,
recently, observers felt the admin-
istration would establish an inde-
pendent campus police force.
This disturbed city officials. The
city officials, who also feel the
money pinch, say the city would
have been hurt if the University
stopped absorbing some of the
police budget.
The new plan calls for the Uni-
versity to pay all costs of a "Uni-
versity Unit" which would con-
sist of 25 to 35 men working out
of Ann Arbor Police headquarters.
These men would be under the

command of
Chief of Police.

Walter Krasny,

Davids main criticism of the
plan is that, in the long-run, he
says it would be more expensive
for the University. "Admittedly,
it would save short term cost such
as providing a building for the
men," Davids said last night.
"But we would have to pay for
clerical and administrative per-
sonnel which the University al-
ready has."
Davids favors a plan similar to
the type presently existing at
Wayne State University and at
Eastern Michigan University. The
major difference between those
plans and the one being presented
by the University is that under
Wayne's system the force is under
command of an officer responsi-
ble to that University.

'U' Cellar to print agent list

Huron that would more effectively number of recommendations may
bargain for change than the coun- stem from "asking the same

KO
New Winter Prices!!
$155/semester
Individual meals (note reduction)
$1.75/meal-Fri. and Sat.
$2.25/meal-other days
All meals served at Hillel-1429 Hill
Reservations must be made by noon on dey of meal
INFORMATION and RESERVATIONS: 663-4129
Phone 764-0558 to Subscribe to
THE -MICHIGAN DAILY

*

(Continued from Page 1)
Wilson said he had contacted
three attorneys on the legality of
the printing and none could find
any valid reasons for not print-
ing the list.
At the time of the SGC debate
on the subject, Silverstein claimed
he spoke with nine lawyers who
advised him similarly.
"We don't consider our role in
printing the list a political one,"
said Wilson, "and therefore we
didn't consult the Cellar's board

of director's in making our de-
cision. We have a policy of print-
ing all material brought to us,
and this list is no exception."
Three thousand copies of the
list will be printed up and dis-
tributed primarily in dorm mail-
boxes. With the limited num-
ber of copies available, not every-
one will receive a copy, but Sil-
verstein said anyone desiring a
copy could obtain one at SGC of-
fices.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19
Day Calendar
Psychiatry: M. Selzer, "Alcoholism
in a Pro6lem Driver Group," Childrens
Psych. Hosp. Aud., 10:15 am.
Astronomy Colloquium: J. Schwarz,
Harvard Coil. Observatory, "Forma-
tion of Clouds in a Cooling Interstel-
lar Medium," P&A Colloq. Rm, 2 pm.
Commission for Women: Homer
Heath Lounge, Union, 4-6 pm.
Architecture and Design: E. Wed-
dige, "The Artrain's OdysseyaThrough
Michigan," Aud. A, Angell Hall, 4 pm.
Physics Colloq.: M. Yoder, "Shock
Waves in Low Temperature Hydrogen
and Para, Hydrogen," P&A Colloq. Rm,
4 pm.
Statistics: W. DuMouchel, "Stable
Distributions and Statistical Infer-
ence," 2443 Mason Hall, 4 pm.
Botany Seminar: K. Subramanian,
"Regulation of Nitrate Reductase in
Neurospora," 1139 Nat. Sci. Bldg., 4 pm.
Religious Affairs: Ruhani Satsang of
Ann Arbor, lecture on teachings of
Living Master Kirpal Singh Ji con-
cerning meditation and true living,
Friends Meeting House, 1420 Hill St.,
7:30 pm.
Computing Ctr: J. Fronczak, "An In-
troduction to Digital Computers and
the IBM 360/67 Computing System,"
Nat. Sci. Aud., 7:30 pm.
Physical Education Dance Program:
L. Berkley, "Energy," Schorling Aud.,
Sch. of Ed., 8:30 pm.
Musical Society : Choice Series; Paris
Chamber Orchestra with Choral Union
Singers, Power Ctr., 8 pm.
General Notices
Romance Languages & Literatures:
Jose Ruibal, Spanish dramatist, "Span-
ish Theater in the Franco Era," Rm. 2,

Mod. Langs. Bldg., Thurs., Jan. 20, 4:10
pm.
Engineering Job-Hunting Workshop:
Preparatory meeting (must attend in
order to participate in Workshop, Jan.
26) given twice; Elementary Sch. Aud.,
1309 Sch. of Ed. Bldg., Thurs., Jan. 20,
4 and 7 pm.
Applications for LSA scholarships for
next academic yr. and for coming
Spring and Summer Terms now avail.
in 1220 Angell Hall; must have 3.0 gpa
in LSA; awarded on need; applies. due
no later than 4:30 pm. Feb. 11; ques-
tions call 764-7298.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Vietnam Veterans against the War
Meeting, Jan. 19, 8:00 PM, 3540 SAB.
Planning for moves against war pro-
fiteers.
Baratin French Dept. Coffee Hour,
Thurs. Jan. 20, 3-5 PM, Commons 4th
floor M.L.B.
Organization of Arab students Arab
weekend, Rive Gush, Jan. 28, 29, 7:30
PM, Arabic food, entertainment.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

cil did, Ergueta expects very little
response from the students. "I'm
not giving my support to the
union," he said. "Most of the stu-
dents won't pay any attention to.
it."
Ergueta views the resignation as
a personal defeat. He is not proud
of it, he says. But perhaps the
worst part of the entire affair is
that the student body does not
really care, as far as he can see,
whether the student government
has disbanded. "I don't think the
resignation will have a great
amount of effect on most stu-
dents," he said. "They'll just go
on their merry way."
For the Student Body:
Corduroy
Bells
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

people to change salaries who ori-
ginally made them."
Commission spokeswoman Sally
In a more general criticism,
Buxton added that "a knowledge
or understanding of Affirmative'
Action goals may not have filtered
into the supervisory level."
* A

Paraphernalia
announces
Welcome Back
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769-3340

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523
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5/31-8/16
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150
150
150
150
180
170
170
300
190
210
190
190
190

CHG.
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
26
19
19
19
19
19

TOTAL
169+13
219**
169
169
169
169
199
189
189
326
209
229
209
209
209

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