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April 02, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-02

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Page Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 2, 1972

Page Three THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, Apil! 2, 1972

!.

'TH BLIND PIG
A WINE, CHEESE, BLUES CAFE

II
new s..briefs.
by The Associated Press
SEN. WILLIAM FULBRIGHT (D-Ark.), says his Senate
Foreign Relations Committee will use the Pentagon Papers as
a basis for hearings on the foreign policy decisions leading to
U.S. involvement in Vietnam.

EEOC sets'
new sex
bias rules
From Wire Service Reports
The Equal Employment Op-

and Other

Things

NOW OPEN-7:30 A.M.-2:00 A.M.
208 SOUTH FIRST

IT CAN'T BE DESCRIBED-
IT MUST BE EXPERIENCED

The committee's study, to begin in May, will examine the possi- portunity Commission (EEO
bility that "the present conflict in Southeast Asia might have been C) has included among its

oust

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
Wed., April

5

4-6 p.m.
4th Fl. Rackham

avoided had the United States not disregarded Ho Chi Minh's friend-
ly overtures to the United States during and immediately after World
War II," in Fulbright's words.
JORDAN will receive 15 to 20 jet fighters from the United
States over the next two years, diplomatic sources said yesterday.
The U.S. has displaced Great Britain as Jordan's principal arms
supplier in recent years, with a military aid program now running
about $45 million annually. According to government analysts, the
new shipment of jets would still leave Jordan's aid force vastly out-}
numbered by those of its immediate neighbors - Syria, Iraq, and
Israel.
Jordan's King Hussein, visiting Washington, is concurrently urg-
ing that Jerusalem be divided into Israeli- and Arab-controlled sectors.
* * *
ITALY'S PARLIAMENT handed over lawmaking rights in
the fields of health, education, transportation, agriculture and
public works to 15 regional governments yesterday.
The decentralization program gives unprecedented power to the
Italian Communist party, which controls local governments in three
of the regions. The Christian Democratic party, backed by the Ro-
man Catholic Church, dominates in the other twelve areas.
* * *
RUSSELL LONG, chairman of the Senate Finance Commit-
tee said yesterday he would support additional tax-reform mea-
sures to reach wealthy persons who pay few or no taxes.

latest regulations a non-sex
discrimination policy dealing
with pregnancy and child-
birth.
In regulations to be published
in the Federal Register this week,
the employment commission says
that to deny a woman a job be-
cause of her pregnancy constitutes
a violation of the Civil Rights
Act of 1964. Moreover, disabili-
ties related to pregnancy - in-
cluding recovery from childbirth,
miscarriage, and abortion-should
be treated by employers similarly
to other temporary disabilities in
terms of reinstatement and in-
surance payments, according to
the new regulations.!
The guidelines do not carry the
force ofulaw, but they can influ-
ence court hearings on job dis-
crimination. Also, under a bill
signed by President Nixon last
week, EEOC now has the power
to sue employers and labor un-
ions in order to gain compliance.
Other inequities criticized by

Lemonade and Cake for all

i

9i

McGovern addresses veterans
Senator George McGovern (D-S.D.) discusses the plight of monority Vietnam veterans with a group
in Milwaukee yesterday. McGovern and Hubert Humphrey are the co-favorites in the Wisconsin Demo-
cratic primary Tuesday.
ISR SURVEY
Study says society's attitudes
may harm school dropouts

F,

U of M Folklore Society presents
BLUES POWER
Son House,
Mance Lipscomb,
Robert Pete Williams
APRIL 15-8 P.M.
at the
POWER CENTER
for the Performing Arts

"Now," said the Louisiana Democrat, "I would like to see some the commission include discrepan-
additional taxes on people who pay all that money into foundations cies between the pension plans of
where, theoretically, they are giving to charity and it turns out male and female employes, and
that the charity they are giving to is themselves." the household" and "principal
Long, who has extensive oil holdings, was careful to reassert wage earner" status.
that levies on the U.S. oil industry should not be boosted. State employment laws apply-
* * *ing special conditions to women,
A CHLORINE GAS-LADEN BARGE has become wedged in such as limited working hours and
a Louisville, Kentucky dam, forcing the evacuation of residents weight - lifting restrictions, are
in the city's Ohio River area. superseded by the federal law in
The Army Corps of Engineers is planning a crucial salvage sinecase of a conflucecommis-
operation, in which a small sailboat will attempt to secure rescue
cables to the menacing barge. The guidelines, which take ef-
s h.fect upon publication, seek to

photo by David Capps
SON HOUSE

.j
r

SON HOUSE is undoubtedly the king of the Delta
Blues singers (Columbia Records).
MANCE LIPSCOMB was a Texas sharecropper until
he was discovered in the early 60's. He is now
considered a great songster and blues singer,
like the late Mississippi John Hurt.
ROBERT PETE WILLIAMS won his parole from
Angola prison by composing a song for the parole
board. He is one of the most unusual and power-
ful blues singers you'll ever hear.
ALL SEATS RESERVED-$3.00
Tickets available 1 1 A.M.-2 P.M. daily
at the Michigan Union
For Info call 761-6945
Don't miss 'A Life Well Spent': "A portrait of the musical route
of Manoe Lipscombe" Sunday April 9, 9 pm, at Cinema It in
Angell Hall.

THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY estimates f
that state and local spending to fight air pollution will double r
over the next four years to meet national air-quality standards.
All states except Alaska have submitted to EPA their plans tot
meet the standards by 1975.
* * *
BRAZIL'S NATIONAL OIL company reports that 21 workers '
have been killed by explosions and fire in the country's largest
oil refinery.
Forty-eight other workers remained hospitalized.
JOHN SINCLAIR was among a group of witnesses testifying
to the need of penal reform during a federally-conducted hearing
in Detroit.j
"The penal system in this state is a closed, arrogant system,"
the head of the Rainbow People's Party asserted. "Despite the propa-I
ganda of the Departmhent of Corrections, the objective fact is that
rehabilitation is a joke."

I

equalize "medical, hospital, acci-
dent, life insurance and retire-
ment benefits, profit-sharing and
bonus plans, leave, and other
terms, conditions, and privileges
of employment."
Another policy chided by the
commission is the lower working
age requirement for minor males
provided under some state laws.
The commission's original;
guidelines on job discrimination
according to sex date back to 1966
The current report marks by far!
the most siagnificant revision of
those guidelines to date.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St.,' Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier. $11 by mail.
ISummer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.#

By PAUL RUSKIN
A recently published study by the Institute
for Social Research (ISR) indicates that high
school dropouts may suffer neither financially
nor emotionally from their lack of a complete
high school education.
The study claims that dropping out is not a
problem in itself, but rather a symptom of "oth-
er problems which have their origins much.
earlier in life." Problems such as past school
failure, low self-esteem, rebellious behavior, and
low socio-economic level were cited both as
reasons why students drop out and as explana-
tions for differences observed between dropouts
and non-dropouts.
Led by Jerald Bachman, senior study director
of ISR, the study dealt with imminent, as well
as actual, dropouts.
In 1966, 2200 randomly selected tenth graders
from 87 high schools filled out comprehensive
surveys concerning all aspects of their lives. Fol-
low-up surveys were then conducted at yearly
intervals to determine what changes had occur-
red in the lives and minds of the participants.
One year after the graduation date of the 1966
tenth grade class, the data concerning dropouts
was correlated and compared with data for
those students who had completed high school.
One of the basic discoveries of the project
was that differences which exist between stud-
ents who enter college and those who gradua.te
from high school but don't enter college are far
more significantathan differences between drop-
outs and graduates not entering college.
Other findings of. the study challenged the
validity of the current anti-dropout campaign,
whose main thrust is to persuade students that

dropping out decreases their chances of finding
a job.
Furthermore, the survey reveals that em-
ployed dropouts and graduates had "nearly iden-
tical" weekly income levels and that "three-
'quarters of the dropouts rated themselves 'quite
satisfied' or 'very satisfied' with their jobs, while
two-thirds of the graduates expressed similar
levels of satisfaction."
On the basis of this evidence, Bachman calls
the anti-dropout campaign "propaganda" based
on "superficial interpretation of statistics" and
urges that it be greatly curtailed.
Bachman attributes several negative side ef-
fects to the anti-dropout campaign. Among them
he points to the bad name which the campaign
has given to dropouts and to the fact that as a
result of the campaign, many employers may
now be requiring high school diplomas for jobs
which previously employed non-graduates.
As a first step in closing the gap between
dropouts and society, the study proposes that
"the range of educational opportunities for young
people aged 16 to 18 be broadened, and serious
consideration given to reducing the number of
years necessary for attaining high school diplo-
ma." After graduation, students interested in
continuing their education could then enroll in
publically supported, junior college-like institu-
tions.
On a more basic level, the study calls for ex-
panded "early school and pre-school interven-
tions" to "overcode many of the problems which
are deeply-ingrained by the time an individual
is ready to drop out of high school."

The hearing, run by U.S. Congressmen John Conyers (D-Mich.),'
and Robert Drinan (D-Mass.), is part of a nation-wide investigation
by the House Judiciary Committee into the American prison system.

I

ON

J

I

FELLI

I1

SATYRI CON

1
,1
t

1

omna

Dial 662-6264 231 S. State St.
Robert Redford George Segal
Zero Mostel
in

I

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Join The Daily Staff

Once upon a time, Gaius Petronius, ARBITER ELEGANTIAE to Nero's court, wrote the world's first novel, the
SATYRICON, now extant only in fragments, and long suppressed or expurgated in this country until a decade
ago. Fellini takes parts of this, and in perhaps his greatest film, follows two handsome pagan hippies through
picaresque episodes in a pagan world-as it was in Nero's time, and as it may be in ours. (For an excellent
article, see Gilbert Highet's "WHOSE SATYRICON-Petronius's or Fellini's," Horizon magazine, Autumn 1970,
p. 42)
ITALIAN LAUGUAGE-ENGLISH SUBTITLES
MONDAY EVENING!-April 3rd-ONLY!

1

J

Open
12:45
SHOWS
AT
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
5 p.m.
7 p.m.
9 p.m.

The first fun
f ' picture of the year !
i":'?:: The
- -----,H I tRock
p ... PANAVISION- COLORSYDELUXE
COMING SOON - "THE LAST PICTURE SHOW"

auditorium a, angell hall

color -35 mm.

CI N EMASCOPE

Rated "X"

7 & 9:30 p.m.

75c

Tickets for both shows on sole outside the auditorium at 5:30 p.m.

i

II

CORRECTION
An ad which appeared on page 11 of the Friday,
March 31st edition of THE MICHIGAN DAILY for
the Democratic party, carried an incorrect headline.
The headline should have read:
HRP Can't Deliver!!!
On The Lavish Promises It Makes.
The headline incorrectly substituted the word
problems" for the word 'promises.'

COMING TUESDAY-April 4th-Sam Peckinpah's THE WILD BUNCH
Fantastic, gory movie
COMING THURSDAY-April 6th-John Schlesinger's MIDNIGHT COWBOY
Now rated "R", but uncut

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ULRICH'S BOOKSTORE'S
1st ANNUAL
$300,0000

"BRAVO, BRANDO'S 'GODFATHER""
-New York Times
"THERE IS ONLY ONE BRANDO. HE IS THE GOD-
FATHER. THE CENTERPIECE OF WHAT PROMISES
TO BE THE 'GONE WITH THE WIND' OF GANG-
STER MOVIES."
-Paul D. Zimmerman, Newsweek
"'THE GODFATHER' IS A SPECTACULAR MOVIE,
ONE OF THE FINEST GANGSTERTMOVIES EVER
MADE."
-Gene Shalit, NBC-TV
"A TRULY EPIC FILM IN THE BEST CLASSIC
SENSE OF THE WORD! EVEN MORE ENGROSS-
ING THAN MARIO PUZO'S BOOK, IF THAT'S
POSSIBLE!"
-ABC-TV
"A MARVELOUS MOVIE! A TOUGH BEAUTIFUL
MOVIE!"
-CBS-TV

I

TONIGHT:
ROOM SERVICE
Dir. GEORGE ABBOT, 1938
With the Marx Brothers in a farce about a
theatrical troupe stranded in a posh hotel
with no cash. PLUS a Marx Brothers short:
The Incredible Jewel Robbery.
Architecture Auditorium
7 & 9P.M. 75c
Tomorrow night check-out the
BLACK FILM SOCIETY

INVENTORY
involving every article in our store

SALE
except textbooks

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U El 'U U El isieiiPiiuiuIhi EEl

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