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April 01, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, April 1, 1972

HALTS DESEGREGATION:
Justice Dept. acts
in Va. busing case
RICHMOND, Va. (P) - The Justice Department requested
and was given approval yesterday to intervene in the appeal
of the Richmond metropolitan school consolidation case as a
friend of the court.I
Following through on President Nixon's school busing
directive, the attorney general's office asked the 4th U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals to be permitted to file a brief and
participate in oral arguments set for April 12.
Approval was granted by Judge Clement Haynsworth, a
former Nixon appointee to the Supreme Court who was re-
jected by the Senate on grounds of financial impropriety.
The attorney general's move in the Richmond case was
the second since President Nixon submitted legislation to
-Congress two weeks ago proposing
a moratorium on court-ordered
McGovern "uing,
In the Detroit school merger
case, the department took its first
supporters"action last week. It asked sithat
srcourt defer further proceedings
are hopegfuln until Congress acts on the pend-
are h peful ing legislation.
The two cases are similar in
gthatjudges in both cities have
(continues from page 1) ordered desegregation plans that
That first place spirit was most would merge inner city and sub-
clearly demonstrated at a high urban school districts. Such a
school rally Thursday night which strategy would overcome the prob-
attracted nearly 1,000 predomi- lem of city school districts with
nantly young people. large black populations adjoining
McGovern was introduced by lily-white suburban schools.
Pierre Salinger, author and former In the Richmond school system,
aide to President John Kennedy. the city schools are now 70 per
The senator received a. tumultu- cent black while the county
.ous standing ovation as he entered schools have a black population
the hall. His speech centered on of less than ten per cent.
conditions he was "fed up with" If the desegregation plans were
in American society. adopted, all the schools would be
McGovern reiterating his stand between twenty and forty per cent
against the Vietnam war, and his black.
declaration, "I'm sick and tired In a decision that contrasted
of old men dreaming up wars for sharply with the Richmond rul-
young men to fight in," received ing, a federal appeals court in
the loudest and longest ovation of Georgia upheld a desegregation
the night. plan that called for the use of
McGovern's speech, like his cam- busing. A plea that the busing
paign, gained momentum as it order irreparably harms "quality
went along. He called his thrust education" in the school system
for the presidential nomination a. was rejected by the court. c-
"people's campaign," saying, "We The school board's major con-
don't have big money like ITT tention was that the U.S. District
backing us." Court which imposed the desegre-
As McGovern finally left, he got gation order violated both the
a third standing ovation and was Fourteenth Amendment and the
mobbed by autograph seekers and Civil Rights Act of 1964 in re-
quiring busing to achieve racial
picture hounds' balance in schools.
At a press conference yesterday, In commenting on this claim,
McGovern explained why he and the appeals court said the Su -
his supporters considered them- pe lcourt "ade te
selvs ahad.preme Court "made quite clear
selves ahead.. that busing is an available tool
It's a feeling I get from talkig for use by district courts in
to people across the state," he achieving school desegregation."
said. "Workers especially are "In the present case the dis-
swinging my way. trict court utilized this tool along
McGovern did surprisingly well with the pairing, clustering and
among blue collar workers in New zoning methods long authorized
Hampshire. Most political analysts by the Supreme Court and this
have predicted a split among la- court."
bor here, with management going
to Sen. Edmund Muskie (D-Maine)
or Humphrey and rank file to Nursery school
Wallace. The 'Clonlara nursery and ele-
McGovern says his new found mentary school is currently ac-
support from workers comes as cepting registration for fall, 1972.
result of his stand on property tax Clonlara is Ann Arbor's only
relief, a. theme which all candi- open education nursery and ele-
dates have been stressing but with mentary school serving ages 3 to 9
varying degrees of success. Also, years. It is located at 1289 Jewett
he claims, workers are beginning Street, Ann Arbor.
to believe that the war is drain- For more information, call
ing money from their pockets. 769-4511.
Student publications wane
due to campus disintereIst

How 10
This is the second in av
of grocery prices among big
The table, prepared by an in
class, ranks 14 stores with

CONSUMER NEWS C.......alifornia
cal grocery prices stack up to appeal
weekly Daily survey lowest overall price first. The store with the
stores in the area. lowest overall prices receives a 100.0 rating, while Ie a ttoinv.a n
storesrstoesginrainstheaivarea.t.Th

troductory economics
the store with the

order of last week's random sampling is also
included.

WASHTNGTON (P) - The state
of California asked the Supreme
Court yesterday to nullify a state
ISupreme Court ruling which out..

PRICE SURVEY FOR WEEK OF MARCH 27, 1972

Name of Store
1. A&P, Stadium & State
2. Great Scott, Packard & Carp.
3. Wrigley, Maple Village
4. A&P, Maple Village
5. A&P, E. Huron
6. Wrigley, Wash. & Stadium
7. Wrigley, Stadium & Liberty
8. Meijers, Carp. & Packard
9. Vescio, W. Stadium
10. A&P, Plymouth Road
11. Kroger, Arborland
12. Kroger, Broadway
13. Kroger, Westgate
14. Kroger, Packard

Last week'
Staples Dairy Produce Other Ratin

All Products Meats

100.0
101.1
101.2
101.5
101.7
101.7
101.7
101.8
101.9
102.6
104.5
104.8
104.9
105.1

100.0
104.3
102.9
102.6
101.4
107.7
105.7
104.6
103.5
102.7
108.2
109.2
112.0
113.4

100.0
99.4
98.4
100.6
101.2
98.8
98.8
101.4
98.4
100.9
101.9
101.9
101.9
101.9

100.0
102.7
102.4
100.5
104.0
98.7
98.7
102.1
103.2
101.3
103.7
104.5
98.7
99.2

100.0
104.5
100.6
108.1
109.6
101.4
107.9
109.6
104.2
128.1
118.8
122.5
121.6
114.9

100.0
99.2
101.1
100.4
100.3
100.3
100.3
99.3
101.5
99.1
101.3
100.7
100.7
101.5

lawed the death penalty.
s California - Attorney General
g Evelle Younger argued that the
California Supreme Court had ille-
gally assumed a legislative role
by abolishing the death penalty
when public support to retain it
was high-
"By abolishing the death pen-
alty the court has enacted its
personal views into law over the
will of a ; protesting public,"
Younger wrote in the appeal brief.
The state contended that the
California court- ruled premature-
ly on the death penalty by issu-
ing its decision before the U.S.
Supreme Court decides a similar
case already before it.
Younger targeted much of his
argument on the state court's
finding that the death, penalty is
"cruel and unusual" punishment
and therefore unconstitutional.
The California court issued its
ruling Feb. 18 and later refused
a state petition to reconsider. It
also refused to delay the effect
pending the results of the appeal.
In California. 102 men and five
women who had been sentenced to
death had their sentences com-
muted to life imprisonment fol-
lowing the state court decision.
Among them are Sirhan Sirhan,
convicted of assassinating Sen.
Robert Kennedy, and Charles
Manson, convicted in the seven
SSharon Tate murders.

p

Man in the street
After 3 billion years of intense thought, the cosmic wallace
worm emerges from a sewer in time to attend the Hash Festival
to be held on the Diag this afternoon.
WISCONSIN PRIMIARY Y
Labor support a key
to Hump-Nhrey success

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
SATURDAY, APRiL 1 Placement Service
Day Calendar Summer Placement
j 212 S.A.B.
Political Science Dept. - Cultural Interview: Flying Bridge Restaurant,
Revolution Series in honor of C.L.R. Falmouth, Mass.; will interviewaFri.,
James: T. Munroe, Univ. of West In- Apr. 7, 9-5; openings include waiters.
dies, "James and the Caribbean Revo- Waitresses (21), dishwasher and line
lution," 9:30 a.m.; J. Higginson, Univ. cool; register by phone 763-4117 or in
of No. 111., and E. Perkins, State U. of' person.
of No. Ill., and E. Perkins, State U. of Announcements; for further info.
ution," 1:30 pm. A. Singhamt .James about the following, please call 763-4117
and the World Revolution," 3:30 p.m.; or stop in the office.
all lectures in Aud. 4, Mod. Lang. Bldg. Se Calif; infs Canyon Hospitality
University Players: Kopit's "Indians," cations, type of positions, hrs., wages,
Power Ctr., 8 p.m. etc.; applications avail.
Lakeside Farm Camp, Lawrence,
John Stuart Mill Society, April 1, Mich., openings for waterfront (WSI),
1:30 p.m., 3529 SAB. Speaker: Mark campcraft, athletics, maintenance in
Ruessman, "A Christian Approach to regard to farm work.
RuesmanNASA, Maryland; opening for soph.
Economics." (complete by June) in pub. admin.;
-- come in and check out material.
CORRECTION Light housekeeping?
The Pontiac Heights Tenants Wenley House in West Quad is
Union name was used in an planning to have a cooperative
ad addressed to Professor housekeeping system next year.
Kirscht yesterday. A former The program, aimed at improving
PHTU member was responsible the atmosphere of the dorm, will
for the use of the Tenants Un- feature about four hours of work
ion's name, in that paid politi- cleaning the dorm each month,
cal advertisement. This person approximately $75 rebate, and
is no longer affiliated, with continued meals in West Quad's
PHTU and was acting on his spacious dining room.
own as an individual. The PHTU For more information call 764-
does not at this time endorse 5703 or come to the meeting at 1
any particular candidates. Wenley Lounge, Wednesday, April
5, at 7 p.m.

CLARIFICATION
In Thursday's paper, The
Daily inadvertently implied
that registered voters must
present their registration card
in order to vote. This is not
true; a registered voter need
only show up at his precinct's
polling place in order to vote.
The polling place is listed on
the card.

Nsmrrans

(Continued from Page 1)
he sees as dilments of the economy
-inflation, unemployment, and an
adverse balance of payments.
He goes to a Passover dinner
at the Milwaukee Jewish Com-
munity Center and pledges con-
tinuing support for Israel. He
travels to the black community
and asks them to recall that he
fought for civil rights long before
the issue "became popular."
'Judge me by my record of
service," he tells his listeners.
"My record is second to none."
Humphrey knows his long suit
is experience and he wants his
audiences to realize it. He tells
beople of his tenure as mayor of
Minneapolis and his ability as an
.administrator. He cites his legis-
lative record, telling people that
"I stood up in Congress when it
counted."
"You people," he told a group
of farmers in West Bend Thurs-
day, "know the difference between
doers and talkers. You want some-
one who knows how to get people1
together and to get things done. I
come with promises and a record."
Humphrey s e e s unemployment
as a major problem. "I believe
in putting America to work. There
is much work to be done in this
country-ending pollution and re-
building cities. The right to work
is as much a part of America as
freedom of worship and freedom
of speech.".
"I don't want to see jobs lost
in America because of foreign im-
ports," he continues. "Let's start
to have some patriotism in
America. We need to stand up for
America."
But Humphrey, a veteran and
able politician, also knows that
labor will not be sufficient to bring
a victory on April 4.
He speaks to farmers and lashes
out at President Nixon's inability
to raise their income despite ris-
ing food prices.
He has been sensitive recently
about charges that his speechesl
have an over abundance of cam-
paign promises. Senator Edmund
Muskie (D-Maine) has stated that
Humphrey is a "Promise-a-day
campaigner."
In addition, the Wall Street
Journal said that Humphrey is
"promising something for every-
one and to a degree unmatched by
any other candidate."
His record, too, does not go
without c r ii t i c i s m, especially
among the young. They cite his
previous association with former
President Lyndon Johnson and his
failure to come out early against
the Vietnam war during that ad-
ministration.
Detractors also cite that Hum-
phrey's past legislative record,
which they admit is good, is tied
to the old politics. Humphrey is
aware of this undercurrent.
Yesterday, in Madison, the state
capital, Humphrey urged a group
of labor leaders to tell their chil-
dren to vote for him.

the rank and file, whose support
H'u m p h r e y desperately needs.
Those votes that the senator does
not get may very well go -to Wal-
lace with his populist campaign.
Another obstacle is the cam-
paign of Sen. George McGovern
(D-S.D.). McGovern, according to
the opinion polls, may dramatical-
ly boost his presidential hopes
with an upset victory on Tuesday.
The final block to Humphrey
may be Sen. Muskie who now ap-
pears to be the former front run-
ner for the nomination. If Muskie
polls a greater percentage of the
vote than expected it may come
from the groups that Humphrey
is counting on for support.
Yet, if there is a strong point'
to Humphrey's campaign it is that
he has stayed above the inter-
necine quarrels among the Demo-
crats.
He has repeatedly' said that he
will not attack the primary op-
ponents in the run for the nomi-
nation. His reasoning is that the
brunt of the attack should fall on
Richard Nixon.
FIRES BURN
MORE
THAN
TREES

For the Student Body:
SALE
" Jeans
* Bells
" Flares
$51OO
reg. to $24.00
CHECKMATE
state Street at Liberty

4

(Continued from Page 1)
Publications.
The yearbook isn't the only pub-
lication which is faced with the
problem of a changing market.
Changes in campus attitudes have
also affected Gargoyle, the Uni-
versity's humor magazine.
Gargoyle stopped publishing af-
ter the November '69 issue due to
a loss of interest and declining
sales, according to 'staffers.
Last fall, however, several peo-
ple revived the magazine and pub-
lished the November '71 issue.
However, the staff was disappoint-
ed with the sales.
Mark Cohen, editor of the last
Gargoyle, attributes the disappoint-
ing sales to a changing market,
which is hurting sales of campus
humor magazines across the coun-

try.
The focus of the humor of this
type of magazine may be one rea-
son for its slump.
"It seems that the kind of ap-
proach that puts national and lo-
cal problems in a light-hearted
vein doesn't seem to have the
kind of interest it had two years
ago," comments Cohen.
As for the future of campus
humor magazines in general, Co-
hen adds, "I think you'll have to
wait until a change in campus life
comes about before you can create
a market for this type of maga-
zine."
Generation, the University's in-
ter-arts magazine, has also been
dormant due to financial difficul-
ties.

. . . . . . . .

-- '
\t
.. ,, _ C h
1-
.

40

ActivitiesI

"But / want

f riend s,

diversity, action and
something to keep my
interest, too!"

L' MIE4StS IaFtFj
BUSINESS STAFF

. OV r 14rr .

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