100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 01, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LAST PERFORMANCE!

Arthur Kopit
INDIANS

Power Center

by The Associated Press
FOUR DEFENDANTS in the 1964 murder of a Harlem shop-
keeper emerged from custody for the first time in eight years
yesterday on reduced bail.
Their hail was lowered Wednesday from $75,000 each to $5,000
after a judge termed continued jailing "unconscionable."
The four defendants, known as the "Harlem Four," have been
tried three times. The state is seeking a fourth trial.
The first conviction was overturned, and two subsequent trials'
ended in hung juries.
Attorney William Kunstler said he would mave to have the case
dismissed on the grounds of "substantial injustice."
UNITED MINE WORKERS PRESIDENT W. A. "Tony" Boyle
was convicted yesterday on all 13 counts of a federal indictment
which charged him with heading a conspiracy to pump union
funds into political campaigns.
The campaign contributions, made to the Democratic and Re-
publican parties over a period of three years, totaled $49,250.
The largest of the contributions, $30,000, was made for a dinner
for Sen. Hubert Humphrey's 1968 presidential candidacy.
Two other union officials, tried for similar offenses, were ac-
quitted.

Ann Arbor, Michigan Saturday, April 1, 1972
ITT witness hits
-- M
Mitcell;Chile
mg
Smeddhn cilted

Sonr4i t

itt4bp
I

MARCH 29-APRIL 1st -
CURTAIN 8 P.M.!
Box office open daily
at 12:30
TICKETS: Wednesday, Thursday $1.50, $2.50
Friday, Saturday $2.00, $3.00
The University Club of Ann Arbor
Michigan Union, 530 S. State St., 763-2236
WEEK'S SPECIALS
Thursday, March 30-Gourmet dinner, rock cornish
game hen with wild rice
Saturday, April 1-chateau briand for two, reser-
vations only
EASTER SUNDAY, April 2-The University Club
will feature a lavish smorgasbord of Seafood,
Buffet Ham, Steamship Round of Beef and a
whole assortment of salads, relishes, and sweets
to tempt anyone's taste. Reservations only, 1 :00-
5:00 P.M.

WASHINGTON (P)-- Susan Lichtman, a secretary for sev-
en weeks to Dita Beard, said yesterday she remembers typing
a memo which indicated former Atty. Gen. John Mitchell
played a part in placing the Republican National Convention
in San Diego.
Meanwhile, Business Week magazine said former CIA
Director John McCone confirmed that executives of the In-
ternational Telephone & Telegraph Corp. (ITT) discussed
possible moves, to prevent Salvador Allende from taking of-

MEAT PRICES WERE FROZEN by several supermarket
chains and cut by others after a meeting Wednesday between
executives from twelve large chain-stores and Treasury Secre-
tary John Connally.
Chain stores announcing price freezes on meat were Grand Un-
ion, Winn-Dixie, Food Fair, and Big Apple supermarkets. Price cuts
on meat were announced by Safeway and Giant supermarkets.
Connally said after the meeting that he expected the price of
meet to drop soon, but that it would reflect a drop in wholesale
prices, and not government pressure.
SEX DISCRIMINATION CHARGES have been filed with the
equal Employment Opportunity Commission by two female truck
drivers. The women are protesting a trucking company policy pro-
hibiting single women from making long distance hauls with
male drivers.
Virginia Barnes and Pauline Blackburn made the complaint
after officials of Watkins Motor Lines, their employer, fired them
and ruled on March 1 that drivers of opposite sexes could not team
up on trucks with sleeping quarters unless they were married.
BLACK RECRUITMENT EFFORTS by the National Guard
are lagging badly midway through a drive to increase minority
participation in the Guard.
The National Guard Bureau reports that a recruiting campaign
which began last fall netted a gain of only 961 Black Guardsmen
through February, 5,000 short of the announced goal of 11,000 black
recruits.
The Guard is hoping for a rise in enlistment, black and white,
if a proposed $600 bonus for enlistment is passed by Congress.

-Associated Press
Easter in Belfast
Easter atmosphere pervades Belfast yesterday as this boy hur-
ries through the center of the city with his Easter eggs surrounded
by the ever-present British soldiers.
JUDGE BACKS TESTIMONY:
IerrTigan jury to
reread trial record
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) - The man reread his definition of con-1
jury interrupted its second day of spiracy. Then he sent the jury!
deliberations yesterday for a re- back to deliberations, with the

$4.50 Adult

$2.50 Children under 12 yrs.

REGULAR HOURS AND EVENTS-breakfast, Mon.-Fri.,
7:30-9 a.m.; luncheon, Mon.-Fri., 11:30-2p.m.; dinner,
Tues.-Thurs., 5:30-9 pm., Fri., Sat, 5:30-10 p.m.; Family
Night every Tues.; Happy Hour every Tues. and Sat., 3-6:30
p.m. Merhbers and guests only.

view of key testimony by FBI in-
former Boyd Douglas during the
federal conspiracy trial of the
Rev. Philip Berrigan and six oth-
er antiwar defendants.
At the panel's request, U.S. Dis-
trict Court Judge R. Dixon Her-

PARADES SCHEDULED
Irish Protestant split expected

BELFAST (W) - Northern Ire-
land's Protestants, expected to
J be united in bitter opposition to
Britain's rule, showed signs yes-
terday of a split.
Three Protestant leaders, ex-
Prime Minister Brian Faulkner,
William Craig and the Rev. Ian
Paisley, were involved in a strug-
gle for control of the one mil-
lion Protestants in Northern
Ireland.
The split emerged when
-Featuring- Craig's militant Ulster Vanguard
Movement publicly criticized
Pizzas Shrimp Faulkner and Paisley and an-
nounced plans for a large-scale
Ch ik ncivil disobedience campaign to
Chicken Fish disrupt British rule.
Meanwhile, William White-
law, Brtain's minister for North-
ern Ireland, started his new as-
NOsignment as violence escalated
among Catholics, Protestants
and troops before the Easter
weekend.
Vanguard said its aim remains

"an independent British Ulster"
if British reforms, aimed at giv-
ing more power to the Catholic
minority, endanger the Protest-
ants' 51-year rule. Both Faulk-
ner and Paisley oppose such a
policy.
The movement said it plans to
hold rent and local tax strikes
throughout Northern Ireland -
tactics the Protestants con-
demned when used by the Cath-
olics. Faulkner also opposes this
idea,
Whitelaw has said he will stay
in Northern Ireland throughout
the critical weekend, which
launches the province's "march-
ing season." Annual Protestant
parades celebrating battle vic-
tories over Catholics centuries
ago, are due to start soon.
Thousands of Catholics also
are expected to take to the
streets over the holiday, defy-
ing a ban on parades. Many
want to honor the memory of

Irish Republican Army men
killed by the British army in
recent months while others
commemorate those who fell in
the 1916 Easter uprising against
British rule. This brought a civil
war ending in Ireland's partition
into an independent south and
a British north.
Britain's worry is that the
Catholic parades will provoke
battles with militant Protestants
and spark a new civil war. Nor-
inally the Protestants do not in-
terfere in the Catholic marches
but security officials fear they
will this year because of Brit-
ain's takeover of the province.
London has promised to add
600 troops to the 14,500 al-
ready in the strife-torn province,
but in 1916, even the presence
of 70,000 British troops failed to
avert civil war.

fra nscript of four days of vital
Douglas testimony which the jury
had requested.
Included was Douglas's version
of a purported plot to kidnap pres-
idential aide Henry Kissinger, to
blow up Washington's tunnel'
heating system and to vandalize
draft boards in at least nine states
Jury foreman Harold Sheets also
asked for copies of closing argu-
ments made earlier this week by
prosecution and defense attorneys.
Herman denied this request, since
the summations did not constitute
evidence.
The seven defendants pleaded
innocent, but put on no defense.
Their lawyers complained the
judge's charge was prejudicial,
and that his summing up of the
evidence sounded like a prosecu-
tor reading the best points of his
case.
Defense lawyer Paul O'Dwyer
said, "I am simply appalled." But
O'Dwyer added he didn't think
the cause of his clients was lost.
"I think the American jury has a
way of smelling these things,"
O'Dwyer said.
In his charge to the jury, Her-
man said, "This is not a political
trial. This is not a trial of the war
in Vietnam."
He also said the prosecution had
every right to make use of paid
informants such as its star wit-
ness, Douglas.
Herman also said Douglas' long
criminal record, stretching back
to 1963, did not mean he "can-
not be truthful in court."

fice as president of Chile in
1970.
McCone, a member of the ITT
Board of Directors since 1966 and
a member of its executive com-
mittee, disclosed that he was con-
sulted and that ITT told the U.S.
government, "If you have a plan
we'll help with it," Business Week
said Thursday.
Columnist Jack Anderson pub-
lished some alleged ITT internal
memos on March 21 that suggest-
ed ITT officials and top govern-
ment and CIA officials tried un-
successfully to promote a military
coup to prevent Allende's taking
office.
In Santiago, the Chilean Con-
gress has ordered a special' com-
mission to begin an investigation
next week of CIA activities in
Chile.
In response to Lichtman, Mitch-
ell has denied any role in influ-
encing the Republican convention
site and Beard, Washington lob-
byist for ITT, has said she didn't
write anything about Mitchell and
the convention.
The memo, published by col-
umnist Jack Anderson, also drew
a link between the convention and
the out-of-court settlement of
three antitrust suits brought by
the Justice Department against
ITT.
Lichtman, now a college student
in Toronto, has said she has no
memory of that portion of the
memo, which has delayed the con-
firmation of Richard Kleindienst
to succeed Mitchell as attorney
general.
At a news conference, Lichtman
also said it was not uncommon
for ITT to provide favors for
congressmen and senators.
She recalled. a call from the of-
fice of Sen. Vance Hartke, (D-
Ind.), who, she said, wanted a
plane ride on one of a fleet of ITT
Jets. Hartke wanted to fly to a
midwestern speaking engagement,
Lichtman said, but he was turned
down.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day throughSunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier. $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates; $5 by carrier, $5 by mall.
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

Nxon act
halts two e
rail strike
WASHINGTON (P-The threat
of railroad strikes at midnight
yesterday was postponed for 60
days when President Nixon in-
voked emergency powers of the
Railway Labor Act-
The President appointed emer-
gency boards in a threatened
strike by the AFL-CIO United
Transportation Union (UTU)
against the Penn Central Rail-
road and in a nationwide wage
and work rules dispute involving
the AFL-CIO Sheet Metal Work-
ers International Association.
The UTU had said a strike was
inevitable if the Penn Central be-
gan carrying out its announced
intention of laying off some 6,000
workers over several years.
Nixon's UTU action freezes the
current situation and prevents the
Penn Central from laying off the
workers as well as forbidding the
union to strike.
The Penn Central, which has
been operating in bankruptcy for
more than a year, said the work-
ers it intended to lay off were no
longer needed and that it would
ultimately save $97.5 million a
year.
The Sheet Metal Workers dis-
pute involves union demands for
wage hikes of $1 more per hour
for its 6,000 railroad members
than the 42 per cent increases
over 42 months accepted by more
than 500,000 other rail workers.
The Sheet Metal Workers un-
ion is also seeking to eliminate a
work rule that permits other shop
craft union men to perform work
in its job jurisdiction.
The work rule was imposed by
Congress along with a wage settle-
ment two years ago to avert the
threat of a nationwide strike. The
Sheet Metal Workers also were
the target of a compulsory settle-
ment imposed by Congress in their
negotiations the time before that
to end a coast-to-coast walkout
that halted the nation's railroads.

A

WORSHIP

CROSSWORD

PUZZLE

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor-971-3152
Sunday School-9-:45 a.m.
Worship-li :00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m.
Training Hour-6:00 p.m.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m. - Festival Eucharist and Sermon
(fullichoir).
10:00 a.m. - Festival Eucharist and Sermon
(full choir).
12:00 noon-Holy Communion (1928) and
Sermon.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow Ave.
Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Church School and Service at 10:30 a.m.-
Special Easter Service- Sermon, Music,
Communion, and a Tree Planting:
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Celebration.
11:00 a.m.-Time for meeting and snaring
with others in the lounge.
6:00 p.m.-Celebration through drama: Pres-
entation of a contemporary morality play,
"Life or Death."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Services of Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00
Cor - " "r- -A-+;-- -C 1 4- 1

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
9:00 and 11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover
Rupert: "Marching With the Victors."
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00 to noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Saturday, April 1:
8:00 pm.-"What Will We Do With All
These Rotting Fish," a short play read in
Wesley Lonuge. The play is a modern in-
terpretation of events in the Bible.
Sundav, April 2:
5:30 a.m.-Sunrise Easter Service. Leave the
church at this time to go to Arboretum
(Mary Markley Hall entrance). Anyone
invited.
7:00 a.m.-Breakfast, Pine Room. Everyone
invited.
No Sunday evening program.
Monday, April 3:
12:00 noon - Discussion Class, Pine Room.
"The Christian Perspective and the Inner
Life:" Lunch 25c.
Thursday, April 6:
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grad Community.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday Schoot
(2-20 years).
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -.
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
For transportation call 668-6427.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
AND CENTER
801 South Forest at Hill
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SATURDAYj
11:30 p.m.-Easter Vigil and Eucharist.I
SUNDAY
6:30 a.m.-Eucharist.
8:00 a.m.-Easter Breakfast.
11:00 a.m.-Eucharist.
6:00 p.m.-Supper.
7:00 p.m.-Proqram.j
WEDNESDAY
5:15 p.m.-Eucharist.
CANTERBURY HOUSE'
at 330 Maynard St.
(The Alley/The Conspiracy)
Canterbury House, meeting at 330 Maynard
St. (The- Conspiracv), 11:00 a.m.-The
Eucharist. Easter. Morning has broken,
wine, bread, celebration, music by Rob
and friends, the delight of discovery that
just when it seemed all over, it had only
just be.qun.
From 5:00 a.m. Easter Sunday Morning,. 'til
we're ready to do the Eucharist-Vigil to
greet the new day, to prepare for celebra-
tion, to pull our thoughts together, to be at
peace. At Canterbury House, 603 E. Wil-
liam St. (Over Mark's Coffee House).
"Dream up, dream up, let me fill you up with
the promise of a Man."-Neil Young.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149I

13. 1----
13. ACROSS
A word that will tell you about the HEALTH SERV-
ICE'S emergency dental care, abortion referral, non-
enrolled students' and spouses' privileges, contra-
ceptive lectures, medical records, confidentiality,
and a special VD information phone number . . .

T-* BLIND PIG
A WINE, CHEESE,. BLUES CAFE
and Other Things
NOW OPEN-7:30 A.M.-2 :00 A.M.
208 SOUTH FIRST

763-4384

COUZENS FILM CO-OP
PRESENTS
"The Cheyenne Social Club"

r'

Healh Service

WeekdaysN
Noon to Five I h

JAMES STEWART
SHIRLEY JONES
- TONIGHT -
7 9, 11 P.M.
COUZENS HALL

STARRING
HENRY FONDA
75c per person
$1 per couple

FELLI

I

ATYRICON

Once upon a time, Gaius Petronius, ARBITER ELEGANTIAE to Nero's court, wrote the world's first novel, the
SATYRICON, now extant only in fragments, and long suppressed or expurgated in this country until a decade
ago. Fellini takes parts of this, and in perhaps his greatest film, follows two handsome pagan hippies through
picaresque episodes in a pagan world-as it was in Nero's time, and as it may be in ours. (For an excellent
article, see Gilbert Highet's "WHOSE SATYRICON-Petronius's or Fellini's," Horizon magazine, Autumn 1970,
p. 42)
ITALIAN LAUGUAGE-ENGLISH SUBTITLES
MONDAY EVENING!-April 3rd-ONLY!
__I_.. r Y. .Y &"IILI rkA A c ^n -j - /I T rII. A ....I

11

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan