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March 31, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-31

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Page Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 31, 1972

Page T hr e T E M I HIG N D IL Y rid y, arch 31, 197

I

COUZENS FILM CO-OP
PRESENTS
"The Cheyenne Social Club"

JAMES STEWART
SHIRLEY JONES
FRI., March 31 & SA
7, 9, 11 p.m.
COUZENS HALL

STARRING
HENRY FONDA
4T. 75c per person
$1 per couple

KRIS KRISTOFFERSON
and BONNIE RAITT
FRI., April 21
8 p.m. Hilf Aud.
$1.50, 3.00, 4.50
reserved seats'
"His songs are pieces of
dreams realized. His de-
livery; honest, sincere,
and right to the point." TICKETS N OW: MICHIGAN
UNION 12-6 p.m. M-F, and
SALVATION M a y n a r d Street
store only.
LAST PERFORMANCE!

news Wbriefs
by The Associated Press
HARVARD PROFESSOR Samuel Popkin was given a maxi-
mum 18-month sentence on federal civil contempt charges result-
ing from his refusal to answer grand jury questions about the
Pentagon papers.
Popkin's attorney filed an appeal immediately after the decision
was returned Wednesday.I
Popkin, an associate of Daniel Ellsberg, was released on $1,000
personal recognizance.
* * *
A WOMAN JUROR taken hostage in the Marin County court-
house shootout admitted under cross examination at the Angela.
Davis trial yesterday that her testimony may have been influ-
enced by the prosecution-
Maria Graham testified Wednesday that her captors repeatedlyl
demanded freedom for the Soledad Brothers.
However, yesterday she admitted that her first report to investi-
gators 11 days after the shootout did not mention the Soledad Broth-
ers.
CONGRESSIONAL INVESTIGATORS accused the Division
of Biological Standards (DBS) of allowing 32 ineffective vaccines
to stay on the market for over ten years.
A General Accounting Office report also said the DBS released
flu vaccines for three years even after tests proved their potency to
be less than one percent of standards.
The report urged removal of ineffective biological products from I
interstate commerce, saying 75 of the 263 DBS-licensed products wereE
"generally not recognized as being effective by most of the medical
profession."
THREATENED STRIKES by the United Transportation Union
(UTU) against Penn Central Railroads and the Sheet Metal Work-
ers Union against the Association of American Railroads may
cause President Nixon to invoke a "cooling off" period, press
secretary Ronald Ziegler said yesterday.
Under provisions of the Railway Labor Act, Nixon can create
an emergency board to look into rail disputes and make any strike
illegal for 60 days.

Army

lures
Invited from the nursing
school and high school rosters
of Ann Arbor, Chelsea, Man-
chester, Dexter and Saline,
most women at the meeting Fri-
day indicated that the Army was
almost their only alternative.
"I don't have the money for
college," remarked one 16-year-
old, who said she wanted to go
into psychiatric nursing.
A University nursing student
concurred, saying she wanted to
take the burden of her educa-
tion off her father.
"I'm a materialist," another
women joked.
"The Army is not for rich peo-
ple," Tasey commented. She
said many women come to the
Army for lack of other job and
pay options.
Other women expressed inter-
est in a job that is "better than
my job now" and in the excite-
ment of Army life. "I have
ideas of spies and stuff", com-
mented one high school sen-
ior. Another said she hoped tc
"learn responsibility, see the
world, and meet new people" in
the Army.
Responding to the needs of
women like these, Army moves
shown at the open house stressed
training, pay, and promotion op-
portunity.
However, publicity concentrat-
ed most on the peripheral as-
pects of the Army career, such
as travel, social activities, re-
creation, and the chance for
Army women to "meet and mar-
ry the man they have been wait-
ing for" even while on field as-
signments.
A pamphlet entitled "Fashions
with a Future" couched the at-

WAC, ANC RECRUITMENT

focal

women
vantage of Army work, ,he said.
Army pay - "The same as
your male counterpart's" - and
travel opportunities - a guar-
anteed 16 months in Germany,
aim at women looking for paid
adventure.
Women are lured with offers
to live in a "dormitory-like" sit-
uation where "new friends",
men, and recreational facilities
are always available.
WAC and ANC women may
rank as high as first lieutenant
upon beginning active duty if
they participate in the WAC
Student Officer Program in col-
lege.
Length of required service var-
ies from two to three years de-
pending on the amount of time
spent as a paid student at a re-
gular academic institution. At-
school pay may be as high as
$486 a month.
-_<} A six-week Army orientation
program and any further spec-
nnce, ialty training is included in ac-
tive duty time.
fe in de- Recruitment Sergeant Philip
VAC uni- Leroy called last week's open
frth Ave- house "real successful" and om-
was chit- mented that Army efforts to re-
up ctard- cruit women here are aided by
g women publicity from women already
nd white. involved in Army scholarship
he WAC and training programs. Leroy
he asaid the recruitment office in-
s an ap- vited about 1,800 women to Fri-
ynd their s-eto
satfil day's meeting.

Gray-green wool'

Arthur Kopit
INDIANS

A UTU spokesperson said
Penn Central goes through with
conductors. The Sheet Metal
and stricter work rules.

yesterday a strike is inevitable if
plans to lay off 6,000 brakemen and
Workers are seeking more money'

Power Center
MARCH 29-APRIL 1st
CURTAIN 8 P.M.!
Box office open daily
at 12:30
TICKETS: Wednesday, Thursday $1.50, $2.50
Friday, Saturday $2.00, $3.00

A 30-DAY FREEZE on the prices of fresh meat and poultry
was announced by Grand Union Co., the country's tenth largestI
food chain.
There was no immediate indication that other major food re-
tailers would take similar action.
Should there be any declines in wholesale prices during the 30
days, Grand Union said its retail prices would be reduced accord-
ingly. Grand Union president Charles Rodman said that "by holding'
the price line on meat for a month we are doing something positive
in the fight on inflation."
RALPH NADER'S Aviation Consumer Action Project peti-
tioned the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) yesterday to penalize
the nation's major airlines for their late flights.
The research group stated that all airlines made their schedule
within a 15 minute grace period 74 per cent of the time in 1970,
which is one per cent below the minimum requirement set by the
CAB. ,
Citing Delta and Eastern Airlines as the two most tardy, the group
suggested airlines pay a penalty to their customers equal to the'
price of the ticket for a cancelled flight and $25 to each passenger
for each half hour a flight is late.

By REBECCA WARNER
"The most beautiful girl in the
world. A U.S. Army Nurse."
This is one of the slogans de-
corating publicity posters and
pamphlets at the local Army re-
cruitment center as the Wo-
men's Army Corps (WAC) and
Army Nurse Corps (ANC) step
up a recent campaign to increase
their strength, doubled in the
past two years.
In sharp contrast to the care-
free atmosphere of Army re-
cruitment films and publicity,
however, was the attitude of
women at a WAC and ANC open
house Friday night.
High school students and Uni-
versity nursing degree candidat-
es, they were generally more
concerned with training and pay
opportunities than with Army
men, swimming pools and chap-
eroned dances. Almost none said
they would prefer the Army to
college if they were able to af-
ford further academic training.
Surrounded by a generous sup-
ply of party food, the 50 to 60
women attending the openhouse
saw three Army films and talk-
ed to about 10 uniformed Army
recruitment officers, male and
female.
"No you don't have to get vjur
hair cut" and "Yes you can get
married," Sergeant Alice Tasey
told a group discussing WAG.
Another officer, Lieutenant
Paula Stalbaum, who returned
recently from a nursing assign-
ment in Da Nang, passed around
a height and weight require-
ment chart when several wo-
men expressed the fear that
they would not meet Army
weight regulations..

rru Ae an wan i i
fillment through "serving your
Country in the proud tradition
of the United States Army."
After a few months ir the
Army "I felt like a real wom,.,n,"
commented one movie's typical
Wac. She went on to say the
men she was helping "needed"
her. "They needed a smile," she
said.
Publicity also stressed t h a t
femininity need not be lost by
enlistment. "As an officer in
the Army Nurse Corps y u are
truly a professional woman, but
no less a woman than you can
be in any other pursuit, ' bub-
bled one pamphlet.
WAC's may work in any of
96 job specialties ranging from
food service and clerical work
to "intelligence analysis" and
psychological warfare. Few WAC
jobs are highly trained however,
most requiring from 6 to 13
weeks of specialty training.
The Army offers women op-
portunity for promotion, respon-
sibility, and continuing educa-
tion, its publicity emphasizes.
Tasey has worked in medical
assistance, in psychological test-
ing, in personnel, as an admin-
istrative assistant to a general,
and in recruiting during h e r
Army career. Choice of joi lo-
cation and field is a major ad-

'Evening elega
tractions of military lif
scriptions of stylish W
forms. Ann Arbor's Fou
nue recruitment officev
tered with life-size stand
board figures of smiling
in uniform, both black am
The other side of t
and ANC sales pitch i
peal to women who fi
inh~q "rnrntin ' n ri

PARAMOUNT PICTURES IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THE RETURN OF
THE GREATEST FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT OF ALL TIME!

'Commands attention'
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier. $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

'Dress blues'

1

:

"
i i

BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
SHOWS STARTS AT DUSK

I

-

CINEMA II

I

77= ,- '

NOMINATED FOR TWO ACADEMY AWARDS!
WALTER MATTAU For BEST ACTOR
BEST SONG! "Life Is What You Make It"
"KOTCH" (PG)
-PLUS-
MARLO "I I ALAN
THOMAS AJENNYLDA

Aud. A, Angell Hall

7&9P.M.

75c

Tickets On Sale at 6 P.M.

FRIDAY and SATURDAY: Jan Nemec's
REPORT ON THE PARTY AND GUESTS
(1966, Czech)
From the same period as the Czech films as Closely Watched Trains, Shop On Main Street, and Fifth
Horseman Is Fear; Nemec's Party and Guests is a searing allegory about the people's willingness to
conform to fascism. A picnic is interrupted by a mad guest who persuades the others to join in his-
"dame" of insults, humiliation, and torture, when one guest declines, he is chased with dogs and guns.
"It is certainly one of the best Czech films ever made, and Nemec is clearly one of the most powerful
and universal young directors at work."-Renato Adler, NKY. Times
SUNDAY-Joseph Strick's ULYSSES; see Saturday's separate ad.
NEXT WEEK-Fri. & Sat.: TO DIE IN MADRID
SUN.: MINGUS and MANCE LIPSCOMBE, A Well-Spent Life

Summer Rooms
singles & doubles
$30-$45
Open Kitchen
Color TV
Theta Xi
1345 Washtenaw
761-8104

c-

I

STARTS FRIDAY FOR FIVE HORRIFIC DAYS
THE FINAL DIMENSION IN SHOCK?
No. 1-THE CORPSE GRINDERS
No. 2-UNDERTAKER & HIS PALS
No. 3-THE EMBALMER

f!

q

CECILB.DEMILLE'SPODUCINTHE TEN COMMANDMENTS
""ni CHARLTON YUL ANNE EDWARD G YONNE DBRA JOHN
HESTON BRYNNER BAXTER ROBINSON DECARLO-PAGET DEREK
SIN COIC NINA MARTHA JUITH VINCENT Wie fo the cen byAcn,,,Mac n,,yie lsseI. Lasy kJVGa,,ss
HARD WKE-FOCH SCOTT-ANDERSON PRICE a as ducedced by Motio n
G J ^TECHNICOLOR'
ONE SHOW DAILY
7:30 ONLY!

l6k scio 668-708N DRIVE-I
1-94 EXIT 169 JACKSON ROAD

F

rl

iiiii

CINEMA
TONIGHT ONLY
Le Million
Dir. RENE CLAIR, 1930
From the director of Paris
Qui Port, A Nous La Li-

GALA RE-OPENING FRIDAY

MATINEE SPECIAL

"Out-Disneys Disney" - Cleveland Press
"WILLIE WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY"
PLUS: "3 STOOGES" Short

$2.50
PER
CARLOAD

NEW SPRING POLICY
Our Opening Prograrr
Clint Eastwood
"PLAY MISTY
FOR ME" R
Paul Newman
"SOMETIMES A
GREAT NOTION"

$2.50
PER
CARLOAD

1:00 and 3:30

All Seats 75c

berte, and

The Italian

DtNERAICINlMf CORPORATION :.

FILLI

,.
.., w "
..
i . , , ., . .
,.
-..

Straw Hat.
Another brilliant
comedy with music
Clair works from slap-

Once upon a time, Gaius Petronius, ARBITER ELEGANTIAE to Nero's court, wrote the world's first novel, the
SATYRICON, now extant only in fragments, and long suppressed or expurgated in this country until a decade
ago. Fellini takes parts of this, and in perhaps his greatest film, follows two handsome pagan hippies through
picaresque episodes in a pagan world-as it was in Nero's time, and as it may be in ours. (For an excellent
article, see Gilbert Highe':'s "WHOSE SATYRICON-Petronius's or Fellini's," Horizon magazine, Autumn 1970,
p. 42)
ITALIAN LAUGUAGE-ENGLISH SUBTITLES
MONDAY EVENING!-April 3rd-ONLY!

stick to satire in a
story of the search
lost lottery ticket.

zany
for a

PLUS A SHORT:
2fnnv Anniverarv

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