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March 29, 1972 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-29

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Wednesday, March 29, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Hustli
By The Associated Press
DETROIT - Detroit scored four,
goals in the third period last night
to preserve its National Hockey
League playoff hopes with a 6.3
victory over the Boston Bru ns.
It was the Red Wings' first
triumph over the Bruins since Oct.
29, 1970 and the crowd of 16,019
was the largest ever in Detroit.
The victory put the Red Wings
within one point of the Toronto
Maple Leafs for the fourth and
final playoff berth in the NHL East
Division. The Wings have played
one more game than the Maple
Leafs and have only two road
games remaining.
With the Bruins ahead 3-2 after
the second period, Leon Roche-
fort slammed a Detroit goal past
goalie Ed Johnston at 4:51 of the
final period. At 9:14 defenseman
Arnie Brown got only his second
goal of the season and a minute
and 52 seconds later Nick Libett
scored his 30th.
At 17:26 Mickey Redmond added
an insurance tally with his 41st
marker.
In the first period Alex Del-
vecchio scored his 20th goal, the
13th season the Wings' captain
has scored 20 or more. The other
Wing goal was by Tim Ecclestone
in the second period while Bos-
ton's goals came in that period
from Phil Esposito, Wayne Cash-
man and Bobby Orr.

Wings

stay

in

picture,

6-3

NHL playoff race at a

glance

East Division
W L
Toronto 31 30
Detroit 33 34
Detroit-at New York, at Chicago
Toronto-Boston, New York, at Boston
West Division
W L
Philadelphia 25 37
Pittsburgh 24 38
California 21 36

T
14
9
T
13
13
18

Pts
76
75
Pts
63
61
60

To play
3
2
To play
3
3
3

The victory clinched a post-sea-
son Stanley Cup playoff berth for
St. Louis a fifth straight season.
The Blues have 67 points with two
games to play.
Vancouver scored . first when
Bobby Schwautz rifled his 11th
goal season past Blues goalie
Jacques Caron, who was partially
screened on the drive at 8:11 of
the opening period.
* * ,
Flyers tie
ST. PAUL - MINNEAPOLIS --
Goals by Philadelphia's Bob Kel
and Ross Lonsberry matched a
pair by Minnesota's Dennis Hex-
tall as the Flyers salvaged a 2-2
tie last night in their fight for a
West Division National Hockey
League playoff berth.
Philadelphia rallied twice from
one goal deficits to tie the North
Stars, who long ago clinched a
second place finish in the West.

Philadelphia--Buffalo, Pittsburgh, at Buffalo
Pittsburgh-California, at Philadelphia, St. Louis
California-at Pittsburgh, Minnesota, at Los Angeles

Blues sing
ST. LOUIS-Garry Unger scored
his 35th and 36th goals of the sea-
son, sparking the St. Louis Blues
to a 2-1 National Hockey League
victory last night over the Van-
couver Canucks.

Unger scored the winning goal
at 12:45 of the final period follow-
ing a scramble around the Ca-
nucks goal. The puck deflected
off rookie Vancouver netminder
Ed Dyck, making his ninth NHL
appearance.

warriors upset Bucks

-Associated Press
ACE RED WING defenseman Arnie Brown (4) feigns losing his
contact lenses amidst a flock of sympathetic Boston Bruins in
the first period of yesterday's titanic struggle at the Olympia.
However, Brown caught the boys from Bean Town flatfooted,
pulling the famous puck under the belly ploy, then passed it
to Alex Delveccio who laced the net. It was desire like this
that allowed Detroit to blast the Bruins 6-3 to remain in conten-
tion for that last playoff berth.

DIA MONDMEN HOPEFUL:
Title hopes rest on new hurlers

By BOB McGINN
With only two hurlers return-
ing from last season's excellent
pitching staff, Michigan's chances
of moving up a notch to first in
the Big Ten this season appear to
rest squarely on the shoulders of
a trio of freshmen pitchers. .
It's always a nice situation if
freshmen can be gradually initiat-
ed into the rigors of the college
game. But Coach Moby Benedict
has no choice but to find out
quickly in the non - conference
games whom he can rely on for
duty later in the conference title
chase.
A year ago pitching held the
club together. The 1971 staff turn-
ed in the incredible number of 27
complete games out of the 36 they
started on their way to a spark-
ling 2.18 E.R.A. These totals will
be most difficult to equal this
year, and Benedict knows it.
"We lost the great Jim Bur-
ton, along with capable perform-
ers Dan Fife and Tom Fleszar.
These losses will definitely hurt,"
Benedict comments. "But I was
generally pleased with the work
of our staff in Arizona and I feel
we'll have good pitching again
this year."
The loss of Burton, now in the
pro ranks, will especially be felt.
He was the kingpin of the staff.
finishing with nine complete
games and a 1.48 E.R.A. Fife and
Fleszar were the fourth and fifth
starters and recorded a combined
4-4 slate.
The two returnees Benedict ex-
pects .so much from are juniors
Mickey Elwood and Pete Helt.
Both had fine sophomore seasons
and it's quite possible that the
pair might form the best 1-2
pitching combination in the Big
Ten.
A rangy righthander, Elwood
was razor - sharp on the Arizona

spring trip. In the 14 innings the
6-3 West Bloomfield native work-
ed, he gave up just two earned
runs and seven hits. Elwood pitch-
ed in the tough Basin League,
considered by many to be the best
collegiate summer league in the
country, and Benedict feels that
he is improved because of it:
Helt, on the other hand, had a
very shaky time in the sun. He
was hit hard, and his E.R.A. of
14.44 shows it. Most of the dam-
age came in one game when Ari-
zona State blasted him for 14 tal-
lies. But his coach's confidence in
him is unshaken: "One game
means nothing. Helt has had two
good years for me, and I expect
he'll have another."
After the two veterans, only one
man, Reggie Ball, who worked one
inning last year, has any college
experience. "We're just going to
have to give each of them their
chance in the early part of the
season and see what happens,"
Benedict says.
Three freshmen, Tom Joyce,
Craig Forhan, and Bill Srock, have
looked good in workouts thus far.
With the schedule showing Fri-
day - Saturday twinbills on the
first three weekends, they'll have
'ample opportunity to perforni.
Joyce and Srock both pitched
in the Detroit Arday League last
summer with the former emerg-
ing as MVP. The southpaw Joyce
was highly sought-after and is a
hard thrower. He started twice in
Arizona and did an acceptable
job.
Srock, likewise a lefty, was in-
effective in his initial outings. He
was plagued with wildness, walk-
ing a batter an inning.
The third highly - regarded
first - year man, Forhan, is only
17 but is learning quickly. In the

Wolverines final spring game
against Arizona, the hard-throw-
ing righthander relieved Elwood
and scattered six hits in four in-
nings to pick up the win.
A real surprise on the spring
trip was converted catcher-out-
fielder Mike Corp. In four relief
stints the 6-3 junior allowed only
one run to lead -the team with a
1.04 E.R.A. Like many of his
counterparts, he needs experience
to complement his strong arm.
Junior college transfer Mike
Vaughan, the versatile Ball, and
sophomore Gordon Sterling com-
plete the Michigan mound corps.
With the pitching situation as un-
settled as it is, each of these right-
handers will probably get his
chance to show his stuff.

MILWAUKEE (R) - The Golden
State Warriors, down 12 points in
the second quarter, rallied behind
Jeff Mullins and Jim Barnett for
a 117-106 victory over the Mil-
waukee Bucks last night and a, 1-0
lead in their best-of-seven Na-
tional Basketball Association West-
ern Conference playoff.
Mullins scored 29 points and
Barnett, who had averaged only
12.4 in theregular season,dadded
30 as the Warriors beat the de-
fending NBA chamipons for the
third time in five meetings this
season.
' C OIRES
NBA
Los Angeles 95, Chicago 80
Exhibition BaseballJ
Detroit 5, New York (N) 4
Milwaukee 5, Cleveland "B" 3
Cleveland 6, San Francisco 2
Los Angeles 6, New York (A) 5
Chicago (N) 8, San Diego 6
California 6, Oakland 1
Cincinnati 7, Houston 3
Philadelphia 3, Chicago (A) 2
Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 2
Baltimore 6, Texas 1
Boston 3, Minnesota 3
Montreal 5, Atlanta 4
ABA
Floridians 118, Memphis 107
Carolina 127, Virginia 121
Dallas 98, Utah 95

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
RICHARD STUCK
Nate Thurmond chipped in with
22 for the Warriors and held
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar to 28 points,
compared with his league leading
34.8 average.
The Bucks broke into a 30-21
first-quarter lead behind the hot
shooting of Bob Dandridge and
Oscar Robertson. The Warriors
shot just 36.7 per cent in the
period and stayed in the game only
behind 13 points by Cazzie Russell.
Mullins and Barnett each poured
in 10 points in the second period
as Golden State charged from a
48-35 deficit with six minutes left
in the period and caught Milwau-

kee at 55-55 with a minute and a
half before halftime.
Two layups by Barnett sent the
Warriors into a 68-65 lead early
in the third quarter and they
widened it to 90-80 seconds before
the end of the period.
Mullins hit a layup and two free
throws to make it 97-85, but Jabbar
and Lucius Allen each connected
on two field goals as the Bucks
climbed to within 99-95 with seven
minutes remaining.
But the Warriors pulled them-
selves out of trouble as Thurmond
connected for five points and Mul-
lins a basket and free throw for
a 12-point lead with just over four
minutes left.
Oscar Robertson, seeing his
most extensive action since strain-
ing an abdominal muscle Feb. 4,
contributed- 23 points and Allen
21 for Milwaukee.
Russell hit 21 for the Warriors,
16 in the first half.
The Bucks will try and even the
series in the second game of the
series at Milwaukee tomorrow
night.

-Associated Press
THE MILWAUKEE MARVEL, Kareem Jabbar, hooks one over
the outstretched arms of Nate Thurmond. Jabbar's efforts were
in vain as Thurmond and the Warriors defeated the Bucks 117-
106 in the first game of their best-of-seven playoff series.
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