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March 28, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, Marck 23, 1972

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, March 23, 1972

'II

Pickets join CPHA strike)

GENERATING STUDENT VOTES
Rainbow people, HRP ally

SGC Results
Editor's Note: These are the final results of the all
campus elections held March 20 and 21.
SGC President
Majority reached on fifth ballot
Jacobs-Glazer, GROUP-1,881
(majority was 1,706)
Katieff-Reussman, RAP-1,530
Seligman-Steinberg, STUT-1,165
Gill-Kendrick, integrity-740
Rodgers-Sollinger-173
SGC Council Race

Board for Student Publications
Ron Landsman, GROUP-897
Brad Taylor-813
Jay Hirschman-528
Jay Hack-457
Anti-Sex Discrimination
Yes-4,523
No-323

(Continued from Page1)
ors shouted at them and attempt-!
ed to block their exit.
Ann Arbor police officers waved
the cars through a tight cordon of
strikers.
No one was arrested during the
action, but one man was taken
into custody by police earlier in
the day. He was later released.
Mike Shapiro, a member of Lo-
cal 157, yesterday claimed that
the use of Washtenaw County
RhPH- iff' d tiC to uamrd CPHA

protect society 24 hours a day."
"If they were getting double
pay '(working at CPHA on county
time) that would probably be
illegal," he said.
Arlene Griffin, an organizer of
yesterday's demonstration, said
she was pleased with the turnout,
saying that it was important to
have a "hard core of 35 to 40 peo-
ple" to demonstrate on short
notice.
A middle-aged striker at CPHA
was asked how he felt about the

Funding

Yes-2,787
No-2,028

nerii S epuu es tvguu -xl w-
facilities on their own time was students joining on the picket line.
illegal. County Prosecutor William "The more the merrier," he re-
Delhey told The Daily yesterday plied. Another said, "I think it's
that "an officer has a duty to wonderful-it's really great."
HRP discloses contributors

(Continued from Page 1) become fully represented in ther
appointed in the winter of 1970-71. workings of the city."
Now, little more than a year RPP's relationship to HRP has
later, RPP stands firmly behind not mereltiolshdpaouHRPhsj
HR, ccrdngto Sinclair. not merely revolved around HRP's
HRP, according t icar contributions.
"We're perfectly willing to work r
through the electoral system if we RPP's presses printed the HRP
find a reasonable alternative to bumperstickers for all the candi-
the two other parties. We feel HRP dates. Another contribution that
is such an alterantive," Plamon- RPP has made to HRP as a whole
don observes. a is its exposure of HRP candidates
Sinclair believes this change of through the Sun.
heart came about because HRP In the Feb. 18-March 3 issue,
finally proved its stability. RPP devoted two pages to intro-
Sinclair says that RPP withheld ducing the HRP candidates and
support last year because "HRP the HRP platform. In the iMarch
looked like a typical radical ad 17-31 issue two more pages were
hoc group." used to update the progress of the
An additional reason that Sin- campaigns of the HRP candidates.
clair gave for backing HRP was HRP is not the only organization
that it helps destroy the image of with which RPP is working po-
RPP members as "dope-smoking litically. RPP has also worked in
ogres." More specifically, Sinclair close conjunction with the Peo-
emphasized that Plamondon helps ple's Campaign, a non-partisan
refute the myths that he believes coalition of community groups con-
newspapers have built up about cerned with getting out the youth
RPP. vote. As a participant in the Peo-
Concerning her function on City ple's Campaign program, RPP has
Council if elected, Plamondon played an important part :n or-
stresses the importance of reach- ganizing a number of election-

ti, ns for two voter registration
functions sponsored by the Peo-
ple's Campaign. Last Feb. 2 and
again last March 3, concerts were
held to encourage voter registra-
tion among students.
In addition to the public rela-
tions work, RPP has also been
responsible for securing r o c k
groups that have played at the
events.
RPP reports that 500 new voters
were registered at the March 3
gathering.
In another attempt to get out
the youth vote, RPP has arranged
for radio spot commercials by
Mark Farmer of Grand Funk Rail-
road and Mitch Ryder of Detroit,
urging young people to get out
and vote April 3.
Finally, RPP is involved in or-
ganizing a "meet the candidates"
night scheduled Sunday. The event
is billed by RPP as a non-partisan
effort, affording those in attend-
ance the opportunity to meet can-
didates of all parties from all
wards. The night will also feature
guest speakers and some rock
groups.

*
aP~

Elected:

PIRGIM Funding

Mela Wyeth, GROUP-960
Bill Dobbs, STUT-860.91
Vida McClain, RAP-777.79
David Smith, GROUP-538.44
Keith Murphy, RAP-530.46
Not elected:
Wendy McGowan, Integrity-439.36
Mike Lewis, STUT-377.37
Maureen McCloskey, STUT-231.32
David Klein, GROUP-202.72
Jim Bloom, Safeguard-185.58
Rusty Kimmel, GAIN-=-165.58
Steve Reiber, STUT-134.45
Henry Younger, Integrity-125.43
Jeff Doan, GAIN-85.29
Patrick King, STUT-77.15
Alison Sieber-38.55

Yes-3,794

No-1,143
Presidential Preference
George McGovern-1,667
Richard Nixon-592
Shirley Chisholm-538
Ed Muskie-424
John Lindsay-169
Gene McCarthy-147
John Ashbrook-119
Hubert Humphrey-116
Pat Paulsen-97
Pete McCloskey-94,
George Wallace-90
Henry "Scoop" Jackson-52

(Continued from Page 1)
lard, an announced candidate for
state representtive and ZoltoneFer-
ency, former Democratic state
chairman and gubernatorial can-
didate.
Posthill said his contribution of
$2 "was a contribution to cover
the cost of refreshments at a gath-
ering . . . it was not a political
contribution."
Soon after HRP released its fig-
ures Mike Morris, the Democratic
candidate for City Council in the
Second Ward, also disclosed the
contributors to his campaign.
When notified about the HRP
list Morris' Finance Chairman
Robert Reilly said, "the Human
Rights Party beat us to the
punch.'
The largest contribution to Mor-
ris' campaign came from the
Democratic Women's Club, who
donated $175.
K-

Final LS&A Election Results

President:

Diane Rapaport, PESC-965
Howard Victor, RAP-728
Bob Stevens, Action Mandate-462
Jim Gleickman, GRASP-340
Full Term seats:
Judy Lashof, PESC-645
Stuart Weiner, RAP-643
Bill Crawforth, RAP-611
Mark Wood, RAP-592

Susan Paul, PESC-575
Allan Harris, RAP-573
Patrick Heller-570
Half Term Seat:
Jim Weinstein, PESC-559
Others:'
Ben Romer, PESC-553
Dean Wilcox, PESC-538
Steven Georgia Speil-101

Order
Your
Subscription
Today
764-0558

Tom Burnham, City Council
candidate in the Second Ward,
said that it would be very difficult
to compile a list of his contributors
because most funds for his cam-
paign came from a general Re-
publican fund.
City Council candidates Ulrich
Stoll, Bruce Benner and Robert
Foster said that they had not
really considered the subject of a
list.
The remaining City Council can-
didates, John Kirscht, C. William
Colburn, Mona. Walz and Lloyd
Fairbanks could not be reached
last night for comment on the
matter.
VOTE
NANCY
Weschler
City Council
SECOND WARD
" Controlled city
growth planning to
meet needs of poor,
not just business
. Stop destruction of
central city resi-
dential areas
e Stop Ashley-First
(Packard-Beakes)
e Establish recycling
center
is Stricter antipollu-
tion ordinances
Vote
HUMAN
RIGHTS
PARTY
Monday, April 3

FFF--,

Children think for themselves
at Clonlara innovative school

4

ing all people in the community. oriented events.
She has said, "It's time that we !RPP has handled

public rela-

. I

(Continued from Page 1)
Children are allowed to pursue
whatever interests they have at a
given time. The school is set up
so that children can move from
one station to another - singing
around a piano, making collages
and candles at the art table or
playing numbers games at the
math table.
A child is never forced to learn
anything he doesn't want to, ac-
cording to Wallace. A child who is
not motivated to read or learn
numbers, for example, is allowed
to learn those basics when he is
ready to.
A free learning system not only
allows a slow child more time to
learn; it sets no limits on how far
a fast learner can be taught, ex-
plains Wallace. One second-grad-
er, for example, can already work
fractions and decimals that even I
can't understand," she says.
With access to film-strips and
movies, two second-graders learned
how to run a projector and re-
wind it - a task many adults
never learn to perform. In addi-
tion, almost all of the children
can run a film-strip.
Wallace believes that parents
send their children to Clonlara be-
cause they "don't want their chil-
dren to be bullied into learning.
They don't think young children
should have to learn the same
thing every day, in the same place
and by the same teaching method."
Ann Andrew, whose seven-year-
old daughter attends Clonlara,
says it's "worth it" to send a child
to a school that costs more than
many state colleges.
"It is at least as valuable to

make an investment during the
formative years as when the child
reaches college age," she says.
She describes her daughter as
"very independent and self-reli-
ant" but doesn't know whether
Clonlara has made her that way
or not.
Another parent, Hillary Delouch,
objects to public schools because
of the rigidly structured "classes,
rules and regulations."
"Clonlara has more faith in
children to do what's right when
they are ready to," she says.
Even if her children were be-
hind those in public schools, she
would. "not be concerned" because
she believes in time they will catch
up.
Deloach also pointed out as ad-
vantages the small classes and in-
creased individual attention from
teachers at Clonlara.
An important reason to many
parents for sending their pre-
school age children to Clonlara
has to do with the social attitudes
they learn.
Glenn Rosenthal calls Clonlara
''an excellent way for a child to
develop the social ability to coop-
erate with other children and the
freedom to learn at the same
time."
He describes his own five-year-
old daughter as one who accepts
authority, and thinks some of the
strong disciplinary methods used
in public schools would serve no
useful purpose for her.
Children from lower-income
families are often excluded from
the Clonlara experience. Several
children have attended the school
on scholarships provided by pri-

vate individuals but most of the'
scholarships ran out long ago, and
only three non-paying children
still attend the school.
Nine teachers "guide" the chil-
dren in their learning ventures.
aided by volunteers from the Uni-
versity and from Eastern Michigan
University's education and psy-
chology departments.
Occasionally parents offer their
services. One parent, for example,
comes in twice a week to teach
math games to anyone who's in-
terested.
Initially the novelty attracted
only one or two children; butac-
cording to Wallace, the game
problems were so "challenging"
that eventually a large group had
gathered to learn.
"Teachers have to be on their
toes more here than in a struc-
tured school," Wallace says, be-
cause they often have many dif-
ferent learning groups to super-
vise.
Children may take field trips to
rock quarries, University sites or
the botanical gardens.
There are no grades for children
at Clonlara, but Wallace believes
that not all children thrive in a
free atmosphere.
"Some children are better off
where they are disciplined," she
says. Wallace explains that a
child's home environment must be
free if he or she is to be com-
fortable in a free school setting.
Children who must be told what
to do and what decisions to make,
will feel lost at Clonlara, she says.
DEAD COWBOYS
More cowboys drowned fording
swollen rivers than died in gun
fights, according to the National
Geographic Society's latest book,
"The American Cowboy in Life
and Legend."
Iw

For the Student Body:
LEVI'S
Corduroy
Bells
CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

Joi*n the faster Parade . .
Gl2 oV'VI al ele yance in
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Johnston & Murphy
Pei
jlqe lineil in American -made
lootweap
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STYLE SHOWN AVAILABLE IN:

$

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atudw Iln Rome a 0 0

Harrisburg trial enlivened

I

(Continued from Page 1)
tive to acquit me and find some
defendants guilty."
The events of the week and the
accommodations for participants
are tightly organized. Among the
coordinating groups are: the Har-
risburg Defense Committee, the
Angela Davis Defense Committee
and the People's Peace Coalition.
Plans for the remainder of the
week includes eminars, workshops,
guerilla theatre and smaller dem-

onstrations. A crowd of 15,000 is
expected for this Saturday's mass
rally.
Today's activities will be high-
lighted by a woman's contingent
march to the local draft board and
federal building. The groups plan
to dress in Vietnamese mourning
costumes and ketchup-stained
bandages and will perform a guer-
illa theater die-in at the- draft
board office.

POCKET
BILLIARDS
"a great game"
Free instruction
Thursday, April 6
Michigan Union

June 10 to July 31-$760.
STIMULATING CURRICULUM " OUTSTANDING FACULTY
ETRUSCAN ARCHAEOLOGY PROGRAM
Send for new brochure
Trinity College/Rome Campus, Hartford, Conn. 06106
After 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 28
nothing will be sold.
no brands will be mentioned.
INSTEAD-we are offering an informal discussion
of the terms used in the audio industry. For exam-
ple, What are RMS, I HF, and Peak Power? What
is an FET transistor? What is the difference be-
tween a reflex and air suspension speaker? We
hope to talk about receiver amplifiers and tuners,
as, well as speakers, taperecorders, and phono-
graphs. We hope the information will help you in
selecting a stereo. Please call us if you can come.
This week's feature:
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I . 111I MICHIGAN lIANKARO I iy ii

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