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January 19, 1972 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-19

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

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Return of
the
GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
PARTY
WED. 8 P.M.
4th FLOOR
RACKHAM
hot cider ond cake

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, January 19, 1972

BE THERE

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Box Offices Open 6:30
Electric Heaters

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WILLIAM HOLDEN
RYAN O'NEAL in

"WILD
ROVERS" GP

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FRIDAY-SATURDAY-SUNDAY
RICHARD HARRIS 0 JOHN HOUSTON
"MAN IN THE WILDERNESS" GP
STELLA STEVENS
"BALLAD OF CABLE HOGUE" R
3rd HIT-"SUDDEN TERROR"

by The Associated Press
PRIME MINISTER MUJIBUR RAHMAN granted amnesty
yesterday to prisoners convicted by court-martials under the
former Pakistani regime in Bangladesh.
Female convicts and prisoners under 18 years of age were re-
leased completely and those awaiting death sentences had their terms
commuted to fourteen years of hard labor.
In other developments in Bangladesh, it was reported that nearly
half of the ten million refugees, who fled the country during the
recent war have returned to their homes.
*E* *
THE HOUSE is expected to complete congressional action
this week on a campaign spending reform bill.
The bill which will probably emerge will represent a compromise
that fully satisfies neither party. Its provisions call for closing some
of the loopholes involved in spending.
Specifically it sets a limit on the amount of money"a candidate
can spend on media advertising and makes stricter requirements for
disclosing campaign expenditures.
BLACK RIOTS raged for the third straight day yesterday
in the city of Gwelo Rhodesia.
The riots were touched off by an agreement reached between
Britain and the white government of Rhodesia which blacks feel will
maintain white rule over the country indefinitely.
Blacks are in the majority in Rhodesia, but hold only 16 of
the 66 seats in Parliament. The new agreement would increase their
representation, but would still be discriminatory in that it sets up
property qualifications for voting.
HOME BUILDING, a prime economic indicator, was at a
record high in December, government officials reported yesterday.
The December figures made 1971 the best year on record for
housing starts and the total was 43 per cent above the 1970 mark.
Administration spokesmen cited declining mortgage interest
rates, availability of mortgage funds and an expanding economy as
the prime reasons behind the housing boom. The housing news was
a bright spot in an otherwise sluggish economic year.
* * *
SEVEN WESTERN GOVERNORS joined the Nixon adminis-
tration yesterday in calling for quick congressional action to end
the renewed West Coast dock strike.
The governors cited the economic damage done to their states
during last year's 100 day strike as motivation for their actions.
Hawaii, which depends tremendously on the shipping lines, predicts
that many of its small and medium size businesses will collapse if
the strike is not settled in thirty days.
Last year's strike was ended with a Taft-Hartley injunction, but
the issues behind the strike were never resolved.
MADRID UNIVERSITY suffered through its second day of
riots as officials met to consider closing the university.
Protesting students pelted police with stones, blocked traffic,
and smashed windows.
The trouble began Monday when police broke up a student dem-
onstration at the university's medical school. School officials had
suspended nearly 4,000 medical students the week before for refus-
ing to obey an ultimatum calling for an end to a seven week boycott
of classes.
The boycott began over curriculum issues, but the police now
blame the whole affair on Communist agitators within the university.

1a h'cks confront army
An angry crowd of jeering demonstrators confront heavily armed
army officers yesterday in Gwelo, Rhodesia. The blacks were
protesting an agreement between the British and Rhodesian
governments. (See News Briefs).
SAFETY PROBLEMS
A ntimollution cars
founad unsatisfactory

USSR vessels
seized In Alaska
by'Coast Guard
By The Associated Press
An incident involving two Russian fishing boats and the
U.S. Coast Guard which could jeopardize already precarious
U.S.-Soviet relations occurred yesterday off the coast of
Alaska.
The two Russian vessels, the Lamut and the Kolyvan,
were accused by the Coast Guard of conducting illegal fish-
ing operations within the U.S. 12 mile limit in international
waters.
The Coast Guard party boarded the Lamut to escort it
back to the Alaskan Coast when the ship broke away from

-Associated Press

I

DETROIT ;') - As a result
of tougher federal laws govern-
ing automobile pollution levels,
Detroit automakers now say
that 1972 cars will suffer a
number of performance prob-
lems including tough starts,
stalling and increased gasoline
consumption.
In addition, a report recently
presented to Congress by the
National Academy of Sciences
raised the possibility of safety
problems resulting from the pol-
lution adjustments.
"The public may, be buying
vehicles whose components are
more likely to malfunction and
whose driveability and reliability
may not be satisfactory," said
the report. "Severe driveability
problems could have significant
safety implications." ,
Prior to the passage of the
1970 Clean Air Act, automakers
were devoting most of their en-
ergies to technical details likq
quicker starts and low gas con-
sumption. Now in order to meet

the 1975 deadline that calls for
a 90 per cent reduction in pol-
lution emissions, automakers say
that other mechanical problems
must be solved at the expense of
performance.
To meet the guidelines car-
buretors must be set to allow
more air and less fuel into the
combustion chambers of thej
cars' engines, thereby reducing
polluting leftovers cast into the
air as exhaust emissions.
However, this also increases
the chance that the driver will
have to flip the starter three
times before the engine catches
and will have to idle the engine
longer before it runs smoothly.
New car engines are also de-
signed to burn gasoline more
completely to reduce pollutants
blasted from the tailpipe. The
heat used to burn thedfuel thor-
oughly could be used to drive
the car further. The result has
been fewer miles per gallon of
gasoline for most 1972 models.
The National Academy of Sci-
ences report blamed part of the
problem on the limited test per-
iod available to the auto manu-
facturers.

the American vessels.
What ensued was a four-hour
chase of the Russian vessel which
ended when the Coast Guard
threatened to fire a warning shot
to stop it. The Russian ship was
again taken into custody, and no
injuries were reported to the
Americans on board during the
chase.
The fishing incident comes only
a few days after the expulsion of
Rep. James Scheuer (D-N.Y.)
from the Soviet Union on charges
that he engaged in subversive ac-
tivities. Specifically he was ac-
cused of encouraging certain fami-
lies to emigrate from the Soviet
Union.
In Anchorage, U.S. Attorney G
Kent Edwards, said the vessels
probably will be charged with 11-
legal intrusion into American ter-
ritorial waters. He also said that
no charges were expected to be
filed in connection with the chase
Higher level government offi-
cials also attempted to play down
the importance of the incident.
Presidential Press Secretary
Ronald Ziegler said the run-in
with the Russian ships will have
no effect on President Nixon's
scheduled trip to Moscow which is
presently set for May of this year
This and a similarly low-keyed
response from the State Depart-
ment contrasted with the officia
indignation that would have been
expected from such encounters in
cold war days.
State Department Press Officer
Charles Bray said "as a matter of
courtesy we informed the Soviet
embassy" of the Coast Guard's
seizure of the fishing boats, but
that no protest had been lodged
with or received from the Soviets
'This isn't " diplomatic prob-
lem," the State Departmen
spokesman said. "This is a fishing
problem, over which the Coas
Guard has jurisdiction."

SRecord high
to
predicted for
Nixon budget
By The Associated Press
President Nixon will send to
Congress next Monday his fourth
consecutive deficit budget, report-
edly calling for record spending of
nearly $247 billion in fiscal 1973.
Part of the increased spending
will come in the defense budget,
which has been stable for the last
several years: Nixon reportedly has
approved Defense Secretary Mel-
vin Laird's request for funds for
the development of new weapons
programs.
The President's revenue sharing
plan will also get a greater budget
1allotment, but cuts were made in
the outlay for unemployment com-
pensation.
The size of the prospective +de-
ficit was not divulged by govern-
ment sources, but they acknowl-
edged that the deficit gap in the
. current fiscal year, 1972, will have
widened to nearly $40 billion by
I the fiscal year ending next
June 30.
Even if Nixon's 1973 deficit is
zestimated at only half that much,
and many economists predict it
probably will be higher - he will
have piled up total deficits of
f more than $85 billion since taking
t office.
s That would top any other ad-
t ministration except Franklin D.
I Roosevelt's final term in World
War II.
Whatever estimate of the deficit
t Nixon submits to Congress, the ac-
tual amount will be governed
t largely by the pace of the business
recovery this year, since tax col-
lections are geared to individual
incomes and corporation profits.
To date that recovery has been
disappointingly slow. Nixon's op-
timistic forecast of a year ago that
1971 national output would total
$1.065 trillion turned out to be
roughly $20 billion too high.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University' of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuepday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

J

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S BEST !"

-Bella Abzug -
----Tom O'Horgan

Shirley Chisholm
-John Simon

I

"MOVE%
--NEW YORK TIMES
It will fascinate and pain you."
-Judith Crist, NEW YORK MAGAZINE
What you DON'T know about the Sac-
co and Vanzetti murders will stun you.
The anatomy of the most infamous
trial of the century.

l

L'Air du Temps goes traveling
in Nina Ricci's "Sprayling" se
This smaller, more convenient-
way to take beautiful cologne
with you is a travel-size 1-oz.

far
s.
et t

SHOP TONIGHT UNTIL 5:30 P.M.
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
9:30 A.M. TO 9:00 P.M.

"4
i
,_, .,*..
....+ .
...., ,

spray with it's own 1-oz. refill.

0

SP-zO ; -ia

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