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March 28, 1972 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday~ March 28, 19'72'

f

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, March 28, 1972

Has the music died on

your

FM

radio?

By MARTIN STERN
"And I knew I was out of
luck,
the day the music died ...
So, bye, bye, Miss American
Pie . .."
(copyright in litigation)
Don McLean, in singing of the
day the music died brings to
mind the current situation with
progressive rock stations, a
small but energetic group whose
volume is rapidly diminishing in
America.
KMPX, a Los Angeles b a s e d
station, was the country's first
"hippie FM" station, originating
in the spring of 1967. According
to the latest issue of Rolling
Stone, KMPX finally died, after
several years of internal strug-
gles for survival.
Locally, however, progressive
FM stations have fared better,
with the exception of WRIF 101
which has recently converted to
a pseudo "top 40" format. There
are four stations in the area
which are still basically progres-
sive: WABX 99.5, WNRZ 102.9,
WCBN 89.5, and CJOM 88.7.
Under its old free-format WRIF
has been picking up in the rat-
ings, however its owner, the
American Broadcasting Co., re-
cently dictated WRIF's change
to its present format. T h i s
change involved a turnover of
staff and a new programming
policy. Free selection of music
to be played is out. Selection of
songs from regulated playlists
is now the policy.
Lee Abrams, a 19 year old pro
imported from Miami to serve
as general manager, explains the
change:
"What we did was widen our
base. We're not top forty; we're
an evolution out of top forty.
We're trying for a larger age
bracket. We were aiming at the
18.4 group before; now we're
aiming at the 16-35 group."
Art Penthallow, the sole sur-
viving DJ from the format shift
at WRIF, explained how the new
playlist policy works. About 800
selected songs are listed on file
cards, and divided into four cate-
gories, A thru D. Category A
Includes the top40 hits, most of
which are played once every
four hours. Category B includes
those songs which are popular,
but not played too often; t h e
longer album cuts for example.
Category C includes former
AM or FM hits, and category D
features good album cuts. DJs
are instructed as to how many
records per category to play in
each time segment.
The music played is still most-
ly hard rock and folk; for ex-
ample, WRIF won't play the
Jackson 5 or the Osmond Broth-
ers. On the other hand, t h e y
won't touch most hard blues or
experimental electronic rtusi.
How does a person such as
Penthallow feel about going
from a radio position which al-
lowed him to express hi individ-
uality to his current status as a
d who merely announces t h e
music, time, and weather, and
is only allowed to mention his

volvement. In the past, the sta-
tion has sponsored free concerts,
voter registration drives, com-
munity picnics, and has had live
broadcasts of special events,
such as the John Sinclair Free-
dom Benefit recently. WBAX
also donated $200 to the prize
fund for the Ann Arbor Film
Festival.
For the future, WABX is work-
ing on new free concerts for the
summer. (The series was can-
celled last summer, due to
crowds which got out of hand..
Detz also mentioned that ne-
gotiations are in progress for
the two hour Detroit Tubeworks
television show. The show, which
featured live rock sets simulcast
over both radio and TV, is slat-
ed to be seen in about 20 cities
nationally.
The progressive rock station
for the city of Ann Arbor is
WNRZ. Tiny Hughes, the pro-
gram director, notes that the
station does have a format
guide, but not a strict one. For
example, one top 40 song must
be played each hour. But other-
wise, the djs have a large
selection of LPs to choose from.
WNRZ, originally a. 24 hour
middle of the road rock station,
now handles hard rock 18 hours
a day; from six in the morning
till midnight.
Hughes mentions that the sta-
tion, aiming for a 18-35 year old
listenership, is trying to become
more community oriented. This
means not just serving the stu-
dents, but all of the residents
of Washtenaw County. Hughes
cites WNRZ's expanded 1 o c a l
news coverage as an example of
community oriented services.
The university's progressive

rock station is WCBN, which al-
though it is 24 years old, is
fairly new to listeners as it was
heard only in dormitories until
recently.
John Blattner, WCBN's music
director, notes that the station
does have a. specific format. Cer-
tain types of music are sched-
uled for specific time slots. For
example, only folk music can be
played daily from four to seven.
WCBN-FM is financed by the
regents. It carries no ads, and
is non-commercial. Currently,
about 100 students are affiliated
with the station, located in the
basement of the Student Ac-
tivities Bldg.
Besides its public service pro-
grams, WCBN features m u c h
local news on its newscasts.
Finally, there is CJOM, a new
station on the Canadian side of
the Detroit river. Slightly under
one year old, this station appears
to be a truly progressing rock
station.
Mike Lindor, station manager,
a 25 year old former resident of
the States now lives in Windsor,
Canada, where he has helped
nurture the station to its present
high level of acceptance a n d
popularity in the Windsor and
the Detroit-Ann Arbor area.
Lindor expressed the station's
goal: "We're attempting tc.
bridge the gap between totally
commercial radio and non-com-
mercial radio. We're trying to
increase levels of consciousness
with very tastefully done radio."
The most unique thing about
CJOM it its commercial policy.
No more than six are aire: per
hour, and no more than two are
run together. On Sundays and
on the all night show, no com-

mercials are allowed.
Because of the limited com-
mercial policy, along with ad
rates of only $15 per minute, ad
revenue to the station is mini-
mal. But Lindor states that the
staff of nine is happy to just
break even, which they have suc-
ceeded in doing.
Concerning CJOM's format,
Lindor states that "We program
to a certain extent . . . we prc-
gram by whom we hire." In
other words, before anyone is
hired, the management is sure
that the individual is reliable
and good for the position.
Lindor and his staff meet
every Monday with each other for
a rap session. Grievances and
comments are exchanged. This
is the method used to iroa out
problems at the station.
FCC censorship rules do n o t
cover the Canadian Dased sta-
tion. thus it is not surprising
to occasionally hear a record
played on which the four letter
words have not been bleeped.
"We ask ourselves if what
we're playing is of social import-
ance, and in the interest of good
taste. If so, we'll play it," states
Lindor, citing the, social satire
of Lenny Bruce as an example.
CJOM's community involve-
ment is extensive. The station is
currently financing several
Windsor coffeehouses, and help-
ing new young artists to get
them started. Lindor personally
is involved with the D e t r o i t
People's Ballroom committee,
and also works with the R a d 1 o
Resource Center in this lity.

Wednesday and Thursday, March 29 &,30
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
presents
THE CONFEDERACY
by SIR JOHN VAN BRUGH
and
THE CENCI
by PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY
ARENA THEATRE, FRIEZE BUILDING
Promptly at 4:10 P.M. or earlier if the theatre is filled.
ADMISSION FREE
PHASE HI
ALL DRINKS 10c
Except Black Coffee 8c
HOT CHOCOLATE LEMONADE ORANGE JUICE
COCA-COLA ORANGE SPRITE
STATE AND PACKARD STORE ONLY
DUNKIN
DONUTSWI
To your houme from ours
Fresh every four hours.
"The difference is freshness"
OPEN MONDAY-THURSDAY 7:30-9 P.M.
FRI., SAT., SUN. 7:30-3 P.M.
This offer expires April 17th
Try Daily Classifieds

'CBN kicks it out in the SAB

name twice an hour?
Penthallow states that he feels
the need to express himself, but
also feels the need for money.
At $201 a week plus overtime, he
intends to work at WRIF. as long
as possible until he is eventually
big enough and financially able
to do what he wants; which is
perhaps to have his own radio
station.
"My job is just a stepping
stone to my next gig," he says.
Penthallow believes that WRIF
is going in the right direction to
achieve their goals. The prime
emphasis of the station is on
music that the masses want to
hear, and WRIF bases its play-
lists on record sales and re-
quests.
WRIF still features occasional
community oriented projects.
Some free concerts are being
planned for the summer, and
weekend baseball games between
station personel are being plan-

ned. Also, WRIF broadcasts sev-
eral community oriented p ro-
grams on Sunday night, such as
Peter Werbe's Spare Change pro-
gram.
John Detz is the general man-
ager at WABX, which is De-
troit's oldest progressive rack
station; four years old as of last
month in fact. Detz proudly stat-
es thatWABX is still free form.
"No playlists, no slotting of
records. DJs can choose any cut
from the library," Detz beams.
The ratings give Detz good
cause for a show of pride. The
latest ratings of the American
Ratings Bureau established
WABX as Detroit's number one
Rock FM station. It is also the
number two over-all rock station
(behind CKLW.)
Besides its music, WABX is
well known for its community in-

I

JOIN
Jerry DeGrleck
in opposing the Ashley-First

1

I

DIAL 5-6290
3 SHOWS DAILY
1:00-4:30-8 P.M.

I

FLARES
Your
Choice
$5
reg. to $24

(Packard - Beakes

bypass,

1st Ward
City Council

which will benefit downtown

merchants, but will divide and disrupt the
Black community.
Vole "NO" on Ashley-First
Human Rights Party
, r i

I

Grads, Undergrads, & Professional Students
PARTICIPATE!
" Resource Allocations (2) a U-M & State (1)
e Committees on Communications (2) * Academic Affairs (1)
. Civil liberties (3) . Unversity Relations (2)
*Intercollegate Athletic Board (2) " Intramural Athletics Board (2)
" Student Health Service Planning (4)
APPLY NOW-SGC OFFICE
at 3-X Michigan Union-Ask for a P.I.B. form
the ann arbor film cooperative
presents one of Francois Truffaut's very best and newest films
BED AND BOARD
Now is your chance to see this film which was yanked from a very brief local
theatrical run last year, disappointing so many. The last in a series with Jean-
Pierre Leand (400 Blows, Stolen Kisses). Ends with a delightful couple, very much
married and loving every minute of it.
"'BED AND BOARD' will turn out to be one of the loveliest, most intelligent movies we'll see in all
of 1971."-Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times.
"The best Truffaut in years."--Judith Crist, New York Magazine.
FRENCH DIALOGUE-ENGLISH SUBTITLES
Extra-added attraction: THE MYSTERY OF THE LEAPING FISH (The so-called "Cocaine Comedy")
with Douglas.Fairbanks, Sr. Written by Ted Browning. (Silent)
TONIGHT!-March 28th-ONLY!
auditorium a-angell holi--Color--7 & 9:30 p.m.-only 75c
Tickets for both shows on sale outside the auditorium at 6 p.m.
COMING THURSDAY-Arthur Penn's ALICE'S RESTAURANT with Arlo Guthrie
NEXT THURSDAY-Sam Peckinpah's THE WILD BUNCH (by the director of STRAW DOGS)

0

MON. thru THURS.
$1.50 until 4:30
Then $2.00
FRI.-SAT. eves $2.50
ALL DAY SUNDAY $2.50

CHECKMATE 1
State Street at Liberty

.. , T,,. «,,.. T, .. . r. ., M , ,

+m+ r+ yrre ++ *r. rr 4rre

C
C
(
{
r,

T HE SCHOOL OF MUSIC presents
f Verdi's Opera
FAL STAFF
(IN ENGLISH)
Two Performances Only: April 6 & 7-8 P.M.t
Power Center for the Performing Arts
$3.50 and $2.50 ($1.00 tickets for U-M students with
ID cards, sold at the Box Office only, no mail orders)
Conductor JOSEF BLATT Stage Director: RALPH HERBERT
TICKET INFORMATION: 764-6118
MAIL ORDERS: Falstaff, School of Music, University of Mich-
igan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105. Please enclose self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
Box Office Opens April 3rd at 12:30 P.M.

Green
APPEARING NOW Q
at the
golden falconC
just a great place to get together
fine food, drinks c
us gra(pccht ekoth r % r
stimulating atmosphere golden hour 4-6)
reasonable prices
tN 5 -§GA G44b 4 -4 -Ah ~b AA6 dA

4

od

'

*'

SHOP TONIGHT UNTIL
WEDNESDAY 9:30 A.M. TO

5:30
5:30

P.M.
P.M.

ikwiJ , adL"e . tl r'V

It

U of M Folklore Society presents
The Blues Power concert of the year
Mance Lipscomb, Son House,
Robert Pete Williams
8:00 P.M.
SATURDAY, APRIL 15
at the POWER CENTER

All seats reserved

All seats $3.00

Photo by David Copps
ROBERT PETE WILLIAMS
"Mance Lipscomb, Son House,
and Robert Pete Williams are
Nraa o f ha nrarwfcf rnirnfrv

MANCE LIPSCOMB

smooth as can be,
<!r~r".f: :: Jantzen's no-seam bra
has a pre-shaped cup of
Dacron polyester tricot
with adjustable straps
and a light-stretch body
r. '~L of Lycra spandex.
White soft-cup bra.
Sizes 32-36 B, C. 5.50
Quilt-lined cup bra,
32-36 A. B. C. $6.

TICKETS

AVAILABLE

beginning Monday, March 27
at the Michigan Union
11 A.M.-2 P.M. everyday

+ - .

1.

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