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January 18, 1972 - Image 9

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-18

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Tuesday, January 18, 1972
out to lunch
nyheort novek
Play,% the frosh
or fold

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine
Puckmen near cellar

after double

THOUGH ITS MEMBERS approved freshman eligibility al-
most unanimously, the Big Ten, like most major football
conferences, was not happy about the recent NCAA ruling.
The feeling is that the change was pushed through by the
small college members who feel that they can save scholarship
dollars by playing freshmen. Given the level of competition
among many non-university schools, freshmen should be able
to compete successfully. Thus the school can give fewer schol-
arships since players will no longer have to sit out their first
year.
Unfortunately this argument does not extend to major
universities. Very few freshmen will be able to play big
freshmen will not have the benefit of spring practice their
time football. It takes time to fit into the system and
freshmen will not have the benefit of spring practice their
first year. Not many will be good enough to be ready to go
after three weeks of preparation in the fall.1
So the major powers have very little to gain from the rule
change. If they could have achieved any kind of solidarity they
would have rejected it. But they realized that at least one
conference was bound to accept the change and once that
happened the rest would be forced to follow, which is exactly
what happened.
Word got out almost immediately that the Southwest
Conference was considering adopting the new rule. Member
schools were deadlocked on the issue, but it -was feared that
the league would eventually accept freshmen.
Actually the Big Ten isn't directly affected by the ac-
tions of the Southwest Conference. But the Big Eight is and
once the Big Eight went to freshmen the Big Ten would e
have to follow suit or completely lose the Midwest re-
cruiting battle.t
The Big Ten is already behind the Big Eight and it
couldn't afford to widen the gap. So sit went ahead and
decided to permit freshmen to pay. The faculties still have
the opportunity to veto the proposal, but word has it that 1
no objections will be made.I
So frosh can play next year in the Big Ten. But don'ti
look for many major changes. Schools that haven't been doing<
well lately are looking forward because they will be able to t
give freshmen playing time at the end of hopeless games. Butt
major powers have good sophomores that need playing time sot
the freshmen aren't going to get onto the field very often.t
The situation may well be dIfferent in basketball where
individual talents are more important, but there aren't that f
many great players around. Except for the lucky schools that
4nve a Campy Russell, the frosh aren't going to help much int
basketball either.
However, if this rule is not going to help the Big Ten
that much it might prove detrimental. Michigan athletic
director Don Canham feels that, "This could hurt the Big
Ten more than help it because of the five year rule."
What Canham is referring to is the practice of redshirt-
ing, giving the player five years to complete his eligibility in.
Almost every major conference except the Big Ten uses this
rule. With it a school like Nebraska could use the player's first
year in school to prepare him and then have him play varsity I
football for four years instead of three.;
So why did the Big Ten go along? Mainly because they
didn't want to be left out. A confidential study showed that
of the major conferences only the Ivy League is strongly op.
posed to the proposal. The Big Eight favored it for basketball
but not football. However they are going to adopt it because
they have to compete with the Southwest in recruiting.
The Atlantic Coast Conference proposed it in the first
place, so it Is a safe assumption that fresh will play In
the ACC. Likewise in the Western Athletic Conference,
which backed the ACC resolution.
Small conferences like the Mid American, Missouri
Valley and Southern leagues are in favor of letting fresh-
men play because of the money problem. The Pacific Eight
was said to oppose the move but it has already, adopted the
rule. The Southeastern Conference will be forced to accept
it because of the Southwest.
No choice was left to the Big Ten. It had to go along. But
it still hasn't gone far enough. The only way for it to take
advantage of the freshmen will be for it to adopt the five
year eligibility.
It is not clear now whether freshmen will be redshirted. It
is possible that all schools will have to play the frosh next year.
But if this happens it is a certainty that enough votes will
be found at the NCAA meeting to allow it the year after.
Canham feels that if this happens the Big Ten will, "con-
sider the five year rule' very seriously." He goes on to add that
"I'm in favor of adopting the NCAA rules, period. There is so
much restrictive legislation in the Big Ten in contrast to the
NCAA. Either we should go to a playing league like the Ivy or
we should give the coaches a fair shot to compete with the
other conferences."
And as a parting thought he points out that, "the worst
you can do with five year eligibility is give an athlete an-
other year of education, which would be at their option."

-Associated Press
Am, we knew we couldn't beat 'em'
A dejected looking Jim Klick arrives at Miami Int ernational Airport yesterday following his team's
24-3 trouncing at the hands of the Dallas Cowb oys. Some 2,000 idiot Dolphin fans showed up in
an attempt to 13 nch the inept gridders but coach Don Shula fooled everyone by highjacking the'
plane to Cuba.
DENNY WHOa
Tigers fail to obtain MeLain

By JOEL GREER
The Michigan icers have had
nothing but trouble since New
Year's Day and last weekend
was no exception. Faced with a
host of personnel problems, the
Wolverines dropped both ends
of the series to a Pioneer squad
that Michigan coach Al Renfrew,
calls "one of the strongest" in
a long line of great Denver
teams.
Off to a slow start, the Pio-
neers are just now putting it
all together. The two game
sweep vaulted Murray Arm-
strong's contingent ahead of
Colorado College and into third
place of the WCHA with a 9-5
mark and 22 points. At the other
end of the loop, Michigan has
now lost four straight four-
pointers to find itself struggling
in ninth place with only 10 points
and 22 to the bad. At the year's
end, the Wolverines had only
forfeited eight points and were
in an excellent spot in the stand-
ings. But in the last two weeks
Michigan has lost 16 points and
has dropped to a 5-7 league
record.
After the convincing drubbings
at Duluth, the Michigan prob-
lems began to mount. First, it
was learned that Pat Donnelly,
a promising freshman who had
done so well with Randy Neal
and Bob Falconer, was declared
scholastically ineligible. Immedi-
ately, Renfrew had to juggle his
lines as the number two com-
bination was now decimated.
Further damaging blows occured
in the week when Gary Kardos,
Donnelly's replacement,' came
down with the flu. Adding salt
to the wounds, Gary Connelly
missed Thursday's practice and
was not allowed to make the
trip.

Yports.
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL ALTERMAN
In the Denver camp things
were quite a bit different how-
ever as Murray Armstrong is,
loaded with talent as usual.,
Armstrong went with four lines
both nights as he is frying to
find his best nine forwards for
the stretch run..
The Pioneers came out flying
Friday, night making a mockery
of the whole thing by embarrass-
ing the Wolverines 10-1. The fans
no doubt thought that the Wol-
verines had a date with Adolph
Coors before the game.
Al Renfrew was especially dis-
gusted with the team's play in-
dicating that Denver was able
to move the puck "with no op-
position whatsoever."
It was continuous frustration
all night as the Pioneers seemed
to score at will and the Wolver-
ines couldn't even buy a goal
if they had the chance. They did
get some chances, but they did
not come until Denver jumped
off to a 4-0 lead. First, Paris
soloed in on Pioneer cage guard
Ron Grahme, but the junior suc-
cessfully barred the door as
Paris shot from 15 feet. Less
than two minutes later, Pete
Dunbar broke in alone on a
similar play but was tripped by.
Tom Peluso. Dunbar crashed to
the ice hard and strained his
knee, adding to the list of Mich-

defeat
igan casualties. Dunbar was
awarded a penalty,, shot for his
efforts but was unable to take
it -as he went to the dressing
room for repairs. Naturally,
:Renfrew chose All-America can-
didate Bernie Gagnon to replace
Dunbar but the frustration con-
tinued as Gagnon's effort was
thwrted by Grahame'.
All was not bleak, however, as
the Wolverines pushed aside all
of their woes and nearly knocked
off the Pioneers in Saturday's
contest. Despite the defeat, Ren-
frew was'a lot happier about his
team's Performance.' After those
three 'bad games "the kids
proved they could play hockey
again,'" Renfrew added.
It took a couple of marginal
penalties in the third period to
allow Denver two power play.
goals ,and a 4-8 triumph.
It was a heads-up Michigan
hockey that pressed right up
until the final buzzer. Renfrew
was quick.to indicate, that they
were even pressuring at the end
when they were a man short.
The game was tied going into
the final period after Gagnon
scored the only goal in the sec-
ond period.
WCHA Standings
f .v r .". r r;

By The Associated Press
TOLEDO - The Texas Rang-
ers of the American League -
formerly the Washington Sena-
tors-turned down a Detroit trade
offer of five players for ex-Tiger
pitcher Denny McLain, Tigers'
Vice President Rick Ferrell said
in an interview yesterday. "I think
the trade itself is by the boards
now and I doubt we'll pursue it
further," Ferrell told John Kus-
chell of Adrian, Mich. radio sta-
tion WABJ. The conservation was
taped in Toledo where represen-
tatives of the Tigers were on hand
to open the club's annual press
tour.
Ferrell said the offer was made
a week ago but added, "I'd rather
not mention names. We made
them an offer of five ballplayers."
The Tigers have said they were
interested in McLain but never

mentioned what kind of offer was
made.
Manager Billy Martin said last
week at annual Baseball Writ-
ers' dinner in Detroit that; "Sure,
we're interested in McLain. But
we're not going to offer half our
franchise for him."
Owner Bob Short of the Sena-
tors was criticized for "trading
away half his franchise" when he
acquired the controversial right-
hander from Detroit in October,
1970.
McLain won 31 games for the
Tigers the year they won the
World Series, 1968, then 24 in 1969
before running into trouble for
his involvement with gamblers.
He was suspended by Baseball
Commissioner Bowie Kuhn the
first three months of the 1970 sea-
son and then later after McLain
dumped water on a couple of

sports writers.
Last year, McLain, bothered for
several years by a sore right
shoulder, was the losingest pitch-
er in baseball with a 10-22 record.
"We did make an effort to get
Denny," Ferrell said. "We feel he
could come back and if he could
get back into the swing of things
he would be quite an addition to
our staff to go with Mickey Lolich
and Joe Coleman."
Berenson honored
DETROIT - Detroit Red Wing
center Red Berenson has been se-
lected to play in the National
Hockey League All-Star game Jan.
25 in Bloomington, Minn., the NHL
announced yesterday.
Berenson was one of seven play-
ers named to the team by Al Mac-
Neil, coach of the East Division
All-Star team.
This will be Berenson's fifth
All-Star game. He played three
times on the West team and once
as a member of the Montreal
Canadiens before the game's for-
mat was changed to match teams
representing the two divisions.
SCORES
South Carolina 61, St.Bonaventure 59
Georgia Tech 82, Notre Dame 62
North Carolina State 58, Clemson 46
Eastern Michigan 103, Chicago State 67
Georgia 85, Kentucky 73

W-L
Wisconsin 13-3
Duluth 9-7,
Denver 9-5
Colo. Col. 7-8
Mich. Tech. 6-6
Mich. State 7-9
No. Dak. 7-7
N. Dame 5-7
Mich. 5-7
Minn. 3-11
Wednesday's Games
Michigan at Michigan State
Air Force at Colorado College
Friday-Saturday Games
Michigan Tech at Michigan
Notre Dame at Minnesota
four points
Colorado College at North Da-
kota four points
Minn-Duluth at Denver

PUP
34
24
22
20
18
18
18
14
10
6

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Major League Standings

This Week in Sports
TOMORROW
HOCKEY-at Michigan State
FRIDAY
HOCKEY-Michigan Tech at Coliseum, 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
FRESHMEN BASKETBALL-Wayne State asCrisler Arena, 12:00
noon
VARSITY BASKETBALL-Northwestern at Crisler Arena, 2:00
p.m.
SWIMMING-Michigan State at Matt Mann Pool, 3:00 p.m.
HOCKEY-Michigan Tech at Coliseum, 8:00 p.m.
GYMNASTICS-Eastern Michigan and Chicago Circle at Eastern
Michigan
WRESTLING-Indiana at Crisler Arena, 4:00 p.m.

t
1
1
1

NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
w L Pet
Boston 32 16 .667
New York 26 19 .578
Philadelphia 20 28 .417
Buffalo 13 31 .295
Central Division
Baltimore 20 25 .444
Atlanta' 17 30) .362
Cleveland 15 31 .326
Cincinnati 14 31 .311
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
Milwaukee 38 10 .792
Chicago 32 14 .696
Phoenix 27 21 .563
Detroit 17 30 .362
Pacific Division
Los Angeles 41 5 .891
Seattle 28 19 .596
Golden State 27 19 .587

Houston 16 30
Portland 12 37 .2
Tonight's Game
GB NBA All-star game, Los Angeles

.34 25
.24 301/2

HAIRSTYLING
AS YOU LIKE ITT
NEW TRENDS FOR 1972
TRIMS-SHAGS
and RAZOR CUTS
Dascola Barbers
* 611 E. University
" near Michigan Theatre

414
12
17

i
,r
F
I
t
1

4
51'
6

ABA
East Division
W L
Kentucky 36 9
Virginia 29 18
New York 21 27
Floridians 20 26
Pittsburgh 19 29
Carolina 16 31
UWest Division
Utah 33 14
Indiana 27 19
Memphis .21)27
Dallas 2) 30
Denver 17 28
Tonight's Games
Pittsburgh at Indiana
Floridians at New York
Memphis at Dallas
Only games scheduled.

Pct
.800
.617
.438
.435
.486
.340
.702
.587
.426
.400
.378

GB
8
16i/
18Y2
21
5
13
15
19

lU

5 1
11
20y,
- 1
1312 |
14

Vi ki Club
Weekend Trip To
Collingwood, Ontario-Jan. 21-23
MEETING: Fri., Jan. 14
at 7:00 P.M., 3529 SAB
or
Go to Ski Club Office (2nd fl. SAB)
Thurs., Jan. 1 3 or Tues., Jan. 18
SKI CLUB MASS MEETING
Thurs., Jan. 20, 1972
7:30 P.M. Union Ballroom

WINTER: LOVE IT or LEAVE IT!
HAWAII - WAIKIKI BEACH - $26900

r

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MARCH 4 TO 11

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MARCH 5 TO 12

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HAWAII: HALE MAKI
" TRANSFERS AND BAGGAGE HANDLING BETWEEN AIRPORT AND HOTEL AND RETURN
Studentours, a service of Vacation Travel, Inc. has offered economy charter trips for high school students and college students
kI c_ ,1 _ _

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