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March 24, 1972 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-24

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 24, 1972

PgeTweveTHEMIHIGN AIY Fidy, arh 2, 97

Woodcock
Nixon parei
(Continued from Page 1)
Meany said Wednesday that Pay
Board decisions had been dictated
by the industry and public board
members, and that the Nixon ad-
ministration had not lived up to
its pledge that the Pay Board
would be a voluntary panel with
no direct government control.
When asked how labor could
continue to fight for its, goals with
no representation on the Pay
Board, Woodcock said: "We can
carry it on as effectively as we
have in the last few weeks."
Nixon said he respected Meany
as a labor leader, but added: "As
President I cannot permit any
leader representing a special in-
terest, no matter how powerful,
to torpedo and sink a program'i
that is needed to protect the pub-
lic interest.
Need to recycle old papers? En-
act and Pirgim will be sponsoring
a recycling drive this Friday.
Called "Election Fallout," the
campaign is aimed at collecting
all the debris left over from the
campus elections - but you can
bring other kinds of paper too.
Barrels will be placed on the Diag,
in the Fishbowl, in the Engineer
ing Arch, and at other strategic
points around central campus.

1uits panel;
s board size
"Consequently, I have directed
the Pay Board to continue as a
single public unit, with those labor
leaders who wisely wish to remain
on it, balanced by a reduced num-
ber of businessmen."
In a related development leaders
of the country's two big longshore
unions metprivatelyd fornthree
hours yesterday, but did not an-
swer reporter's questions about a
possible nationwide dock strike.
The walkout was threatened
when the Pay Board reduced a
wage boost won by West Coast
dockers after strikes totalling 134
days.
"We think the Pay Board is
washed up by the action of the!
AFL-CIO yesterday," said Harry!
Bridges, president of the independ-
ent International Longshoremen's
and Warehousemen'snUnion, with
13,000 members in West Coast
ports.
Bridges said he thought the AFL-
CIO walkout from the board "very
definitely" strengthened his union's
claim to the full 20.6 per cent
wage boost in the first year of a
two-year contract. The board cut
it to 14.9 per cent.j

8 mm
Film Festival
Sponsored by--
The Ann Arbor Film Cooperative
The Women's Film Cooperative
TONIGHT-
Women's Films
& Workshops
SATURDAY-
Winner's Night
All Showings Be.gin
at 8:00 P.M.
Schorling Auditorium
School of Education

SOLSTIS SCHOOL presents
A WALT DISNEY
FILM FESTIVAL
Sunday, March 26
7:00 p.m.-"ICHABOD & MR. TOAD"-Legand
of Sleepy Hollow & the Wind in the Willows
9:00 p.m.-"MELODY TIME" with Pecos Bill,
Johnny Appleseed, Little Toot and more!
Monday, March 27
7:00 p.m.-"DAVY CROCKETT AND
THE RIVER PIRATES"
9:00 p.m.-"DAVY CROCKETT, KING OF
THE WILD FRONTIER"
Tuesday, March 28
7:00 p.m.-"DAVY CROCKETT, KING OF
THE WILD FRONTIER"
9:00 p.m.--"DAVY CROCKETT AND
THE RIVER PIRATES"
NAT. SCI. AUDITORIUM
ALL SHOWS 75c

1

-Associated Press
Wringing Wallace
Several hundred pickets marched in front of an auditorium in Milwaukee last night where Alabama
Gov. George Wallace was speaking at a campaign rally. The marchers chanted, "We want Wallace-.
with a rope around his neck."f
FRAUD CHARGE
Jacobs elected SGC pres.

Promises, Promises!

(Continued from Page 1)
lishment of a Public Research
Group in Michigan passed 3,794-
1,183.
Although LSA election results
were announced late Wednesday
night, those ballots are being re-
counted, and final results are still
unavailable.
The amendment to the SGC con-i

stitution against sex discrimina- votes would probably assume the

tion passed 8,523-327.
In the contest for the under-
graduate seat on the Board for
St n d e n t Publications, GROUP
candidate Ron Landsman, '74L,
won with 897 votes. Landsman
may be declared ineligible for the
seat, however, in which case sec-
ond place Student Caucus candi-
date Brad Taylor, '74, with 813

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
"."rnvnn, ..av:"v."."." .".":".".:re: " : " " : : v ; : .: ;

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
....FRIDAY, MARCH 24....
Day Calendar
49th Annual Undergraduate Honors
Convocation: Roger Heyns, Pres. ofI
American Council on Education, ad-
dresses the Convocation, Hill Aud.,
10:30 a.m.
Astronomy Colloquium: V. Reubin,'
"The Andromeda Galaxy," P & A Col-'
loq. Rm., 4 p.m.
Mathematics Lecture: J. Greeno,
"Markovian Models of Learning and
Problem Solving," 3209 Angell Hall,
4 p.m.
History Dept. & Comparative Studies
Prog. in History: M. Finley, Cambridge
Univ., England, "Social Class and the
Ancient Economy," Aud. A, Angell Hall,
4 p.m.
Psychiatry Lecture: T. H. Bullock, U.
of Cal., San Diego, "The Analysis of
Behavior in Terms of Activity of Neu-
rons in the Electric Fish," 1057 MHRI,
4 p.m.
Astronomy Dept.: Visitors' Night,
"Observing This Summer's Total Solar

Eclipse," R. Teske, Aud B, Angell Hall,
8 p.m.
Dance Program: University Dancers
in Concert, Power Center, 8 p.m.
International Folk Dance: Barbour
Gym, 5 p.m.
General Notices
Environmental Health Seminar: R. H.
Gray, "Electron Microscopy Studies on
the Effects of DDT in Rat Liver," Sch.
of Public Hlth. II Aud., Mon., Mar.
27, 1 p.m.
May 1972 Teacher's Certificate Can-
didates: All requirements for teacher's
certificate must be completed by Apr.
10; teacher's oath should be taken as
soon as possible in 1225 Sch. of Ed.
Bldg.; Placement Ofc. material can be
obtained from 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 S.A.B.
Phone 763-4117
ANNOUNCEMENTS OF SUMMER JOBS:
City of Oak Park, Mich.: Parks &
Recreation, wide field of openings; life
I guards, concession operators, playlead-
ers, tennis instrs., baseball, softball
instrs., sports instrs.; further details
avail; deadline┬░ Mar. 29.
Brown Drilling Co., Howell, Mi: Jr..
geology student; work Sat, & Sun. now,
and full-time during summer.
Capitol Consultants, Lansing, Mi.: Jr.
level civil engr. student in sanitary or
environ. study.
Kensington Metro. Park: Day Camp
Director, must have WSI, chauffeur
license, camping skills, etc., details and
applications avail.

office.
Results of the at-large council
races are especially noteworthy be-
cause they mark the first test of
t h e proportional representation
voting procedure, whereby stu-
dents vote for candidates in order
of their preference rather than
simply for a number of candidates.
This method of voting has been
in use for several years in SGC
presidential races, where a can-
didate is required to poll a. major-
ity of votes to be elected. To avoid
costly and time-consuming re-elec-
tions in case a candidate falls
short of winning by majority, stu-
dents indicate their first, second,
third and fourth choice presiden-
tial slates.
Jacobs did not attain a major-
ity in this year's election until the
fifth round\ of ballot counting,
where three candidates had been
eliminated and students' _second,
third and fourth choices were re-
distributed.
Proportional representation for
at-large members insures that
small groups of students who con-
stitute: a voting plurality can elect
at least one candidate to repre-
sent their views, but cannot thus
elect an entire slate.
Concurrent with the all-campus
elections, a straw vote indicating
presidential preference was taken.
Results of this poll are not as yet
available.

a Classified

Rent your
Roommate with

Ac

-

50c OFF

FLARES
Your
Choice
$5
reg. to $24

MEDIUM or
PIZZA, 1

LARGE
ITEM

or MORE

April 3rd and put

a voice, not a

{
i
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mmwd

"Students have been promised repre-
sentation on the city council for years.
It is a promise that non-student coun-
cilmen have seldom kept. The time has
come to put the voice of a student and
not the promise of a student voice in
city government.I am a student, know
students 'and will speak for the stu-
dents on city council. Vote for me on

promise, on the city council."

VOTE

Name .
Address

50c OFF
MEDIUM or LARGE
PIZZA, 1 ITEM
or MORE

APRIL 3
o~ Tom urnham
City Council
2nd Ward

State Street at Liberty

Name
Address

(PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT)

r

/'

' --

I

*

T&&* Creative Arts Festival presents
MARCH 24 AND 25!
Dance Concert Weekend
at Power Center

._.__
'.
l
i
.

Attention
Graduates !!
ORDER
YOUR CAPS
AND GOWNS

#i

I

African

Modern

Ballet /

Featuring University of Michigan Dancers
and guest artist
GAY DELANGHE
of Lucas Hoving Dance Company

NOW!
Deadline for May 6th Commencement
APRIL 15th
*"'ffe 7sort Stoft4
(only at 711 North University store)

1 -

Friday, March 24 and
Saturday, March 25 at
8:00 p.m. $2.00

Young People's Matinee
Saturday, March 25,
at 2:30 p.m. $1.00

Get your tickets now at Stanger's, 307 S. State St., Ann Arbor
Co-sponsored by Dept. of Phys. Ed.

I

11

q
iiO

U

The Most Useful Coupon You May Ever Rip Out ..

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1 -W tiff-
Say It, Sell It, Seek It-T hru Daily Classifieds

AD COPY:

iAni i l i f.

UNCONTRACTED CLASSIFIED RATES
WORDS 1 day 2 days 3 days 4 days 5 days 6 days add.
0-10 1.00 2.00 2.40 3.20 3 90 4.50 .55
11-15 1.15 2.30 2.90 3.90 4 80 5.60 .75
16-20 1.30 2.60 3.60 4.80 5.90 6.80 .85
21-25 1.55 3.10 4.30 5.70 7.00 8.10 1.05
26-30 1.80 3.60 5.00 6.60 8 10 9.40 1.20
31-35 2.05 4.10 5:65 7.40 9.05 1U.50 1.35
36-40 2.30 4.60 6.30 8.20 10.00 11.60 1.50
41-45 2.55 5.10 6.95- 00 .10.95 12.70 1.65
46-50 2.80 5.60 7.60 9.80 11.90 13.80 1.80

Let's hear it for the drunks.
It's not the drink that kills, it's the drunk, the problem drinker, the abusive
drinker, the drunk driver. This year he'll be involved in the killing
of at least 25,000 people. He'll be involved in at least 800,000 highway

I I

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