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March 24, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-24

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Friday, March 24, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Friday, March 24, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

MEDIOCRE SEASON OVER:
Porous defense smothered

By FRANK LONGO
"We will have to recruit de-
fensive help."
Michigan hockey coach Al
Renfrew hit it right on the but-
ton with this comment on the
past season in which the Wol-
verines finished a promising
sixth place in the WCHA, an
improvement over the previous
year's ninth (and last) place
finish.
Michigan finished with a 16-
18 mark, including the two play-
off games at North Dakota, its
best season in three years.
The biggest discrepancy in-
volved, however, was the by-
.r now-well-known difference in
the Wolverines' home and road
records. A fine 13-3 record at
homne was offset by a dismal 3-
15 showing away from the Coli-
seum, but the biggest problem
of all was still not the lack of
a favorable crowd on the road:
it was the lack of a consistent
defense. Some say the lack of a
defense entirely.
MICHIGAN'S GOALS against
average (5.3) ranked ninth in
the ten team league, but the
blame cannot be placed entire-
ly on goalie Karl Bagnell, who
was forced to make 1225 saves
during the year. That was al-
most 200 more than any other
WCHA netminder.

The Wolverine defense shone
at times, but the times were
few and far between.
Jerry Lefebvre's shot block-
ing ability was a fine asset, but
his tendency to get caught up
the ice was not.
"Punch" Cartier, a favorite
with the fans, rattled many an
opposing forward by landing a
vicious bodycheck along the
boards or at the blue line. But
he once again led the team in
penalties and minutesdin the
box, where he couldn't do much
good.
Captain Brian Skinner was
perhaps the most consistent of
the three graduating defense-
men, but again, it was consist-
ently average, at best.
Easily the brightest hope for
the future lies in freshman
Randy Trudeau, who at a mere
5-10 and 175 pounds, played ef-
fectively on defense. carried the
puck when the need arose, and,
in general, used his head.
Along with Trudeau, a good
nucleus around whom to build
a defense, Michigan has only
Pete Dunbar, another sopho-
more-to-be, who loves to hit
and does so, almost too reck-
lessly.
Michel Jarry, a junior, can
play both forward and defense,
but his team-leading 35 assists

show he is more valuable up,
front.
These six men were certainly
responsible for a great part of
Michigan's fortune, and bad
fortune it turned out to be too
many times.
Wolverine victories at home
were usually of the type 3-2,
6-5 and 8-6. On the road,
though, 7-2 and 9-2 scores were
much more common, with Mich-
igan almost always on the short
end.
Despite the troubles of de-
fense and the road, the Wolver-
ine icers did at times raise a
few eyebrows by winning as
many as six in a row, four of
them against first place teams.
Michigan had a 1-3 WCHA
record and wast3-3roverall when
league leading Notre Dame came
WCHA Standings
FINAL STANDINGS

to town. But the Wolverines
sent the Irish home with two
losses, both by scores of 6-5.
The following weekend the
then-in-first-place Sioux of
North Dakota were beaten twice
by the Blue, 9-6 and 4-2.
Michigan was back in the race
for the playoff spot that had
eluded it the year before.
A six game losing skein fol-
lowing the break tended to ham-
per the team's confidence, how-
ever, and Michigan started fall-
ing farther back in the pack.
The low point was the loss of
four straight four-point games
to Minnesota - Duluth and Den-
ver.
But in the end it was the
home ice and home crowd which
was tohelp Michigan sew up
its berth. The Wolves swept
both eight point series at home
over Colorado College and Min-
nesota, which included the last
two games of the season. An
eight point burst on the last two
days was what vaulted Michi-
gan over Colorado College. No-
tre Dame, and Michigan Tech

icers
from ninth to sixth place
Finally, the Wolverines were
eliminated from the WCHA
playoffs in the first round, a two
game, total goals series at North
Dakota. ,
The NoDaks kept Michigan
goaltender Bagnell busy with 47
and 51 shots, respectively, in
the two games. North Dakota
won both, 5-1 and 10-1.
The two biggest los s e s
through graduation are Bag-
nell and right wing Bernie Gag-
non. Bagnell played every min-
ute of every Michigan game.
leaving freshman reservesRoy
Bolles and Terry Lajeunesse
still with no college experi-
ence. The recruitment of a solid
goaltender will be a great asset
to next year's team.
Gagnon, who was drafted by
the NHL St. Louis Blues when
he was a freshman, upped his
goal scoring output of 26 last
year to 35 this season and 28 in
WCHA play to lead the league
in that department.

THE NEW JERUSALEM
Plus a short flick
"W HY MA N CR EA TES"
Friday niht
FRE 7:30p.m.
GRACE BIBLE STUDENT CENTER
State at Huron
SPONSORED Br THE MICHIGAN CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
(Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship)

JERRY
De'Grieck

HUMAN RIGHTS PARTY
CITY COUNCIL
FIRST WARD

Denver
Wisconsin
North Dakota
Michigan State
Minnesota-Duluth
MICHIGAN
Michigan Tech
Notre Dame
Colorado College
Minnesota

19
20
18
15
15
12
11
10
11
7

L
9
8
10
13
13
16
15
16
17
21

T
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Pts
54
48
44
42
40
32
30
28
28
14

VOTE HRP
MONDAY APRIL 3

HE WILL BE DIFFERENT:
" HE WILL REPRESENT the interests of the first word residents, not
business and landlords
" HE WILL VOTE ON COUNCIL according to decisions made at open
publicized democratic meetings of his party
" HE IS COMMITTED TO ENACT the platform of his party---a com-
prehensive program for change in the city and country
304 5. Thayer-761 6621

Pd. Pol. acvertisement

- thru Sunday Mar. 25
This year a closer look at Great
American Racing Cars. On
display along the Street of Shops
in Henry Ford Museum. Plus
exciting races on film in the
Museum Theater. Weekdays 9-.%
Fri., Sat., Sun. 10-10.
Henry Ford
Museum
Dearborn, Michigan

_ _ _ -

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC presents
Verdi's Opera
FALSTAFF
(IN ENGLISH)
Two Performances Only: April 6 & 7-8 P.M.
Power Center for the Performing Arts
$3.50 and $2.50 ($1.00 tickets for U-M students with
ID cards, sold at the Box Office only, no mail orders)
Conductor JOSEF BLATT Stage Director: RALPH HERBERT
TICKET INFORMATION: 764-6118
MAIL ORDERS: Falstaff, School of Music, University of Mich-
igan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105. Please enclose self-ddressed,
stamped envelope.
Box Office Opens April 3rd at 12:30 P.M.
FOOD and DRUG MART
Corner of Packard and Stadium

in ow
rev'T-4

MARCH ART IFAIR
WHEN: Sunday, March 26, 12-6 P.M.
WHERE: Michigan Union Ballroom
WHAT: Artists Displaying and Selling Their Crafts
WHO: Open to Everyone; No Admission Charge
ARTISTS: If you are interested in selling or displaying your work at the March Art Fair,
stop in at room 240 Michigan Union or coll 764-7409 for information and registration.
Registration deadline is March 24.

4' -
'
;
r :' yi
t
a
,- '
r ,,
' % '
,
O'
AI ?
i _
r -.r ~

ctivities ?

"But I

want friends,

diversity, action and
something to keep my
interest, too!"

le fBUgSInNES STaFF l
BLSINESS STAFF

16 pieces
Kraft Individual SLICED CHEESE

. . 49c

IS LOOKING.

FOR YOU!

SPONSORED BY:

STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
OFFICES OF SPECIAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS

Come see FRAN M-F, 10-2 and
M-W-F 2-4 at 420 MAYNARD
Staff members needed in advertising, cir-
culation, classified, and finance.

___,

I

46 oz. can
HI-C FRUIT DRINKS ..
White or Assorted
KLEENEX FACIAL TISSUES.
Chunk Style
Chicken-of-the-Sea TUNA
White, 1000 Sheet Rol
SCOTT BATHROOM TISSUE.
4 oz. can
Van Camp VIENNA SAUSAGE
8 oz. jar
MAXIM Freeze-Dried Coffee
White or Yellow-i 0 oz. con
BETTY LA'NE POPCORN ..

200 for
. . . 19c
* . .3for$1
S .. U t lOc
. . . 19c
. . $1.79
. . . U lOc

5 oz. cups
HUNT'S CHOCOLATE PUDDING

. . ioc

5 oz cup
HUNT'S FRUIT CUP
OPEN: SUN

. . . *. . lOc
N.-SAT.-8 A.M.-IO P.M.
4DAY-9 A.M.-7 P.M.

Forest Food Mart
Forest at Huron

Village Food Mart
South U. at Church

Suburbia Food & Drug
Stadium at Packard

iE LD REED AND WINE I 1

5

i.

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