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March 24, 1972 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-24

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DIAL 668-6416
HELD OVER !
TWO HIT
ENCORES
NOMINATED
FOR
ACADEMY
AWARDSj
"Summer of '42"
BEST EDITING
BEST SCREENPLAY
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news briefs
by The Associated Press

Friday, March 24, 197T.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES

U, T

students campaigni

I

CREATIVE
SHABBAT
SERVICE
Every Friday-6:15 p.m.
HILLEL-1429 Hill
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Read Daily

THE STATE DEPARTMENT yesterday denied a memo alleg-
ing that the United States engaged in coercive activity during thej
1970 electoral process in Chile.
Press Officer Charles Bray srongly suggested, however, that the.
United States was pressured to block Chilean President Salvador
Allende's election but refused to name the source of the pressure.
The memo, released by columnist Jack Anderson and attributed to
two representatives of the International Telephone and Telegraph
Corporaion, alleges that the State Deparment gave the U.S. embassy
in Santiago authority to do all possible short of armed intervention
to keep Allende from taking power.{
THE PRIME MINISTER of Northern Ireland threatened to
resign yesterday in a major political dispute with the British gov-
ernment.
Political sources said Faulkner told Heath, "Go ahead on your
terms and my government quits."
As the political crisis deepened more bombs ripped through the:
embattled country. Blasts hit Belfast's main railroad station and
it's largest hotel.
* * *
THE DEPARTMENT of Health, Education, and Welfare will
not cut off federal funds to force further school desegregation
by busing while Congress is debating President Nixon's proposed
busing moratorium.
The decision, released yesterday, applies immediately to school
districts in Georgia and Maryland which had been taken to formal
compliance hearings by the U.S. Office for Civil Rights.
Although the loss of federal funds has been authorized since
1964 no school or university actually has lost any federal aid since
Nixon took office.
KING HUSSEIN OF JORDAN yesterday declared he will soon
leave for the United States to discuss with President Nixon his
proposal for a realignment in the Middle East.
The king has called for the creation of a semi-autonomous
state of Palestine under his rule on the Israeli-occupied west bank'
of the Jordan River.
Hussein said his plan for a Palestinian state can only be achiev-
ed when Israel agrees to withdraw from the west bank territory it
occupied in the 1967 war.
Israel has spurned the proposal.
MAJOR TELEVISION NETWORKS told a Senate investigating
committee yesterday that they are making efforts to eliminate
needless violence from TV programs.
The network presidents agreed with portions of the U.S.-surgean
general's report that there is a causal relationship between TV vio-
lence and aggressive behavior of some children.
"We are placing additional emphasis on resolving conflict in
children's programs through nonviolent means," said Elton Rule,
the head of the American Broadcasting Company.

4

By RALPH VARTABEDIAN
In contrast to the sensational
political activism of the '60's
students are approaching the
present presidential campaigns
with a more deliberate system-
atic activism.
At the University, this year's
race for the Democratic presi-
dential nomination is not a
student protest campaign as was
the insurgent efforts of Eugene
McCarthy four years ago. Stu-
dent campaign workers seem
more oriented towards candi-
dates than towards specific is-
sues.
There has been a far lighter
student turn-out for Republican
candidates than for Democratic
ones. However, here too stu-
dents are concentrating mainly
on the primaries and on t h e
grassroots government level.
On the Democratic side, one
of the strongest, most active
groups oncampus, Students for
McGovern, has been operating
an office on South University for
several months.
The McGovern office is man-
ned nine hours a day by all-
volunteer help from Ann Arbor.
There are eight fulltime work-
ers, experienced from the bat-
tles fought four years ago. Be-
sides these specialized workers,
there are also 100 part-time
workers and over 500 workers on
file who have pledged time or
have already worked.
The McGovern headquarters is
currently working on petition
drives to get delegate names on
the ballots. "Until you have
candidate presence and media
exposure, actual campaigning
isn't very effective," headquar-
ers coordinator Dave Vaughn
says.
Ted Bartell, co-leader of the
local Youth for Muskie organi-
zation, is also working quietly
but with a dedication unlike that
in the media-saturated elections
in 1968. His organization is try-
ing to fill up precinct delegate
spots and help delegates gather
petitions.
Among Muskie group members.

-Daily-Jim Judkis
STUDENT WORKERS stand at the campus headquarters for the Shirley Chisholm campaign. Chis-
holm (D-N.Y.) is running for the Democratic presidential nomination.

TRUCK STOP
presents
RUSS GRIFFIN

at STOCKWELL

Fine Music

FRIDAY, March 24 at 9:00
NO ADMISSION CHARGE

there are also veterans of politi-
cal campaigns. Bartell was co-
chairman of the university group
for State Senator Philip Hart
two years ago. Mark Levin, a.
law student who is presently
working for Muskie, ran Mayor
Robert Harris' first campaign.
The campus Shirley C h i s-
holm headquarters claims to
have "hundreds working all over
campus," with about 25-30 peo-
ple deeply involved. Budget con-
straints limit their activity and
so the group is concentrating
their efforts on Chisholm's April
10th speaking date here.
Efforts to organize c a m p u s
support for Senator Hubert
Humphrey's campaign have just
gotten underway. Law student
Alec Vensky is forming a group
whose aim he says will be to
enlist volunteers to work in the
state primary and to edajcate
students about Humphrey.
Of the two Republicans vy-
ing with President Richard Nix-
on for the nomination, only Onio
Congressman John Ashbrook has
aroused some active support
here so far.
Bob Edgeworth, a local Ash-

brook spokesman, said se r"ral
students from his group were in-
volved in the New Hampshire
primary, where Ashbrook gain-
ed 10 per cent of the Republican
vote. Edgeworth added that the
group plans to send several peo-
ple to work this weekend on the
upcoming Indiana primary on
May 2.
Mike Rener, a. member of she
Youth Advisory Council to trae
Republican Party, said t h a t
Nixon supporters have recently
been more involved in the Ann
Arbor city election than in ,ire-
sidential politics. A spokeswo-
man at the Republican H e a d-
quarters said that efforts would
be made to form a student group
later in the year.
The Human Rights Party is
most reflective of the changed
attitude. The bitter defeat of
leftist politics at the 1968 Demo-
cratic Party convention convinc-
ed many radicals that .upport
of any national candidates was
futile.
Doug Cornell, coordinator of
the party, declares "We won't
support any Democratic or Re-
publican party candidate b e-

cause participation in those
parties shows what they stand
for."
Cornell believes that the de-
feat in 1968 demonstrated that
third party movements must
have a local support base before
any national effort oan be
mounted.
The party now has about 200
active volunteers working in a
\grassroots bid for power. ITT
party has entered a candidate
in each of the five wards for the
city council elections scheduled
for April 3.
This "direct" effort appears to
characterize the tone for pre-
sent student political involve-
ment, supplanting the :bore sym-
bolic action of four years ago.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by mail.
Summer Session' published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

CINEMA I

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AUD. A, ANGELL HALL

Shows at 7 & 9:00 p.m., 75c

STARTS SATURDAY-4 DAYS ONLY

****

"BEST FOREIGN FILM
OF THE YEAR!"
--N.Y. NEWS

TICKETS ON SALE AT 6:00 P.M.
TONIGHT and Saturday:
Ingmar Bergman'sj
THE PASSION OF ANNA [1970]
Bergman details the mysterious and surreal relationship between Anna and
her lover with closeups like the "stare of consciousness."
(Cinema II open meeting, Monday, Rm. 124 East Quad, 8:00 p.m.)
ANN ARBOR TENANTS UNION
pre sents
FRIDAY, MARCH 24 and SATURDAY, MARCH 25!
7:00 P.M. SHOWING-

NANCY WECHSLER
FOR CITY COUNCIL 2ND WARD
"DECENT HOUSING IS A HUMAN RIGHT"

"One of the Fifty Greatest Films of All Time."
--CROWTHER, N.Y. Times
ACADEMY AWARD
7; WINNER!

" IMMEDIATE CONSTRUCTION OF
5000 UNITS OF LOW.-COST
HOUSING
" DEMOCRATIC TENANT CON-
TROL OF ALL RENTAL HOUSING

* REPEAL ALL LAWS RESTRICT-
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0 ACTIVE SUPPORT & RECOGNI-
TION OF ALL TENANTS UNIONS

S.

BEST FOREIGN PICTURE!
FILMED Grand Prize Winnes
IN ITALY- Venice Film Festival
, WHERE IT
HAPPENED!
IN E N G L ISH!
FEDERICO FELLINT'S
ASTRADA
STARRING TWO OF
AMERICA'S GREAT DRAMATIC ACTORS
TWO-TIME ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
ANTHONY QUINN
RICHARD BASEHART-GIULIETTA MASINA

DUCK SOUP - Marx Brothers
THE BOAT-Buster Keaton
SPARRING PARTNER-Charlie Chapman
plus: ROAD RUNNER Cartoon
9:15 P.M. SHOWING-
MONKEY BUSINESS - Marx

Brothers

MONEY MUDDLERS-Abbott & Costello
BIG BUSINESS-Laurel & Hardy
plus: TWO ROAD RUNNER Cartoons!
NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM-Admission: 75c

Winner
of Ihe
Golden
Gale
Award!

I

U
U

Vote HUMAN RIGHTS PARTY-Monday, April 3
Cre ative Arts Festival
PRESENTS
\ NGrCT 1W
In Conjunction with the Monthly Art Fair Series
and the Student Art Gallery
tall events free admission)
SATURDAY, March 25;1-5 p.m.,in the Student Gallery
ART DEMONSTRATION and WORKSHOP: Poetry readings at
1 :00 (bring your own poems!) and a Quilting Bee at 2:00.
8:00-11:00 IN THE MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM-
COFFEE HOUSE: Poetry Readings by Ken Fifer, Larry Ross, and
Terry Patten. Folksinger Sue Geiger. Bring your own instruments
and JAM.
FREE REFRESHMENTS
SUNDAY, March 26; 12-6 p.m., Michigan Union Ballroom

-TONIGHT ONLY-

Bette Davis

Joan Crawford

ALSO THE 2nd GREATEST HIT

in the Academy Award-winning chiller
What Ever Happened
to Baby Jane.
"Best shocker since PSYCHO!"-Variety
"Grisly fun-achieves its goals with something breathlessly close to perfection. A shocker in the best
Hitchcock tradition, and at the same time a superb showcase for the time-ripened talents of two of
Hollywood's most accomplished actresses."-Saturday Review
"Gorgeous Gothic! The year's scariest, funniest, most sophisticated thriller."-Time

$1 contribution

7:30 and 9:30

free cider, coffee, etc.

--Saturday and Sunday-

in color

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