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March 21, 1972 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-21

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Wage Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 21, 1972

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, March 21, 1972

Clerk releases new
registration figures

Three views from the AA Film Festival

By LORIN LABARDEE
in a report to City Council last
niglit City Clerk Harold Saunders
estimated that as iany as 8,000
of Ann Arbor's 18-20 year-olds
have been registered to vote in
this April's election.
Also included in the report were
the voter registration figures for
last February's primary election.
The total number of students reg-
istered to vote in that election was
6,050, or 43.7 per cent of the 18-20
potential electorate.
Concerning the particulars of stu-
dent voter registration Saunders
stated that a ". . permanent
system of servicing the campus
community will have to evolve."
He cited the large, new group
of potential registrants to be
served and changes of address as
problems specifically to be dealt
with. Saunders is considering var-
ious solutions to this problem.
Saunders gave special praise in
his report to some of the student
deputies involved in registration.
He said: "Several deputies, espe-
cially some student ones, were
quite helpful in making special
trips around town to register shut-
ins who had called the office ask-
ing for assistance in getting reg-
Ward plan.
vote delayed
City Council voted last night to
postpone action on a surprise plan
by the Republican party to re-
draw the city's ward boundaries.
The plan was submitted by the
Republicans to the city clerk late
last week. According to state law,
the city must redraw its ward
boundaries after each census. Lastj
January a ward boundary coin-I
mission was established to present
to council a plan for altering the
city's wards.- .
A motion by the Democrats last
night to submit the Republican
plan to this commission was de-
feated six to five with councilmen
voting along party lines.
The Republicans have charged
that they are under-represented on1
the committee and have boycotted
its meetings.
Council Democrats charged that
the Republican plan was an at-
tempt to "subvert" theboundary
drawing process.
The question will be considered
at a special session of council at
4 p.m. on Thursday.
'r

istered."
An additional topic covered in
the report was the concern and
criticism of some citizens over the
fact that other portions of the city
were neglected in favor of the stu-
dent areas during registration.
Saunders attributed efficiency in
student voter registration to spe-
cial registration sites in campus
oriented areas and not to favor-
itism.
'U'faculty
accepts plan
on research
By ROBERT BARKIN
In a unanimous decision, the
Senate Assembly approved the
compromise plan on classified re-
search. The plan, which was also
approved last Friday by the Re-
gents, now becomes official Uni-
versity policy.
The Assembly, the faculty rep-
resentative body, also began dis-
cussion, but took no action, on the
recommendations by the commit-
tee on Faculty Rights and Re-.
sponsibilities and a proposal by
Student Government Council to
remove the defunct Graduate As-
sembly from Assembly By-laws. j
The research plan approved by
the Assembly is basically the fac-'
ulty proposal approved last Janu-
ary with several significant modi-
fications.
The policy provides that Willow
Run Laboratories - which does
90 per cent of the University's
classified research - continue to
operate under current research
guidelines. The plan also sets up
the procedural steps to be followed
in reviewing classified research
projects.
The report on Faculty Rights
and Responsibilities recommended
that the faculty take a greater
role in financial and policy as-
pects of the University. It also
recommended that "consultative
negotiations" - a form of col-
lective bargaining -- be instituted
by the faculty.,

Shlain
(Continued from Page 2)
thekitchen, spots the"hero,"
and, grabbing the Black Flag
spray almost as a reflex, kills
him as the TV switches to a
discussion of war crimes. Mur-
der! Anyway, no festival would
be complete without such a dose
of "universal consciousness,"
The best movies of the festival
were David Wolper-style docu-
mentaries, tempered with a good
sense of the absurdity inherent
in a few unexplored segments of
Americana. The best of these
was Charles Salmon's Frogs,
winner of a $300 prize. It is a
study of the frog's place in
American culture. It begins with
men whose occupation it is to
furtively capture frogs in their
swamps at night, partly because
frogs are useful for scientific ex-
periments, since their eyes are
so similar to the human eye.
That is just the first of many
obscure links between the quick-
tongued, slimy amphibians and
their perpetual master. The
CSJ rules
Union 'coed'
(Continued from Page 1)
"The Union could ignore the
regulation and admit all women or
else CSJ would have to hear cases
all the time, wasting the court's
time," added Behe.
According to Forsyth, Stanfield
Wells, the manager of the Union,
who represented the Union at the
'in violation of state law if they
ignored the rules of their consti-
hearing, said that they "would be
tution."
"But all the Regents, including
the women," Forsyth said, have
been members for years and no-
body has sued yet."
Wells refused 'to comment last
night on the decision.
The privileges afforded to mem-
bers are "no big deal" according
to Behe, including check-gashing
privileges and a membership card.
But, says Forsyth, the purpose
of the complaint was to eliminate
a "very offensive" rule.

highlight of the movie is the
great camera work at the Frog-
Jumping Contest in Calaveras
County, where froglegs are eat-
en at the "Frogeteria." The
close-up slow motion footage of
the competing jumping frogs,
startled into the jump by
money-hungry owners, is out-
standing.
Glutzer
(Continued from Page 2)
ic dots and lines film (Rain-
dance - the worst of the fes-
tival), the metaphysical 2001
imitation (Saint Flournoy-pos-
sibly a parody, but who can
tell?), the changing shapes and
paintings head film (Pulse and
Animated Paintings), the an-
nual Richard Myers stream-of
consciousness film (Deathstyles)
and the movie within a movie
(again Deathstyles).
You Don't Die Here was an-
other documentary concerning
old people, though it was more
pointed, more respectful. Dull
interviews with old-time Nevadi-
ans were juxtaposed with images
of technology's advance on their
rustic homeland.
It's interesting that a film
should cry out against mechan-
ization in the midst of what is
essentially a technician's film
festival. Most films express their
adoration of the camera implic-
itly, by having the sole point of
interest the perpetually moving
camera. Color Film, a two min-
ute appendage to the award-
winning Raindance, expresses its
love of photographic equipment
more openly by featuring differ-
ent colored film r u n n i n g
HAIRSTYLING
AS YOU LIKE IT!
NEW TRENDS FOR 1972
TRIMS-SHAGS
and RAZOR CUTS
Dascola Barbers
2 SHOPS
" 611 E. University
* 615 E. Liberty
For the Student Body:
LEVI'S
Corduroy
Bells

through a projector for the en-
tire duration of the movie.
The camera wasn't star in
every movie, thankfully. Matter
of fact, in thehbest film of the
festival, Heavenly Star, the
camera wasn't even noticeable.
Riding the wave of our current
romanticization of the Fifties,
Star's twelve minute length was
primarily devoted to a stylized
West Side Story-ish ballet, set
in a brightly colored soda shop
filled with saddle shoes, pig-
tails, greasers, and the like.
Star was humorous but not con-
descending, well-made but not
self-indulgent - a genuinely en-
joyable film. I'm somewhat sur-
prised it was scheduled to be
shown with the winners.
MIu ns ing
(Continued from Page 2)
make a movie of a drum lesson
it should tell something about
music in general or learning
and/or drumming in particular
that you wouldn't hear from sit-
ting in on your cousin Schlep's
piano lesson. Likewise with Bubie
-you'd get more out of baby-
sitting, as well as being paid.
Sparkle City showed cockroach-
es bopping around a kitchen to
a soundtrack of commercials,
soap operas and a Sci Fi flick.
Sure it's funny, and maybe the
others contain some truths, but
assuming that the person holding
DONT
LET
SELL
You
ANY
THING
But, if you buy the idea
of a vocation-a life of service
& prayer for others- we
may be able to help you.
We are the Passionists.
Following the inspiration of
Paul of the Cross we pledge
ourselves to become in a
particular manner disciples
of Jesus Crucified.
By this discipleship we try'
to serve others.
contact:

Rev. David Kohne, C.P.
Passionist Community, Dept. A
23300 Davison Ave., West
Detroit, Michigan 48223

the camera isn't a total moron,
a film of any act will say some-
thing.
The only other good films were
Heavenly Star and Call Me
Steve. Steve was a parody of
eternal triangle movies, follow-
ing its trio through the 40's, 50's,
60's, and 70's. However it didn't
only parody the cultural styles
but the cinematic styles. It was
good, but again, not great main-
ly because it used good re-crea-
tion as much as inspiration.
Heavenly Star, the best film
of the AAFF, was only a parody
in the general sense. An alarm
rings, a guy knocks over a lamp,
is rendered unconscious and
floats off into a dream world of
a fifties soda shop. There is a.
sort of slow motion West Side
Story dancing centered around
the protagonist (in 70's dress)
as he tries to get a girl to the
tunes Heavenly Star and Teen
Queen. Our hero finally wins
the Teen Queen (in pink) away
from SupereGreaser and they
embrace, which fades to a sup-
erimposed melting, overflowing,
sundae. Another alarm rings ex-
cept this time it is the Teen
Queen 15 years later and she's
kissing Super Greaser. "Oh, it's
only you" she mutters, to which
he growls "I'd like to see you
lay bricks on four hours sleep.
If, you wake the twins I'll kll
ya. ,"
But don't feel too bad if you
missed all this-there's still the
SGC elections to look forward to.

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, MARCH 22 & 23
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
.presents
Two by Moliere
T E FRCED MARRIAGE
and
TARTUFFE
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building
promptly at 4:10 P.M. or earlier if the theatre is filled
ADMISSION FREE
A STUDENT PUBLICATION WITH THE STUDENT IN MIND
Students throughout the country, many with the potential of becom-
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they can have their works published. Until now, the only means
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print is through the school's literary magazine, which only reaches
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now have the opportunity of having their literary works read by
other students on campuses across the country.
Sainple issue upon request-50c
NATIONAL COLLEGIATE PUBLICATIONS, UNLIMITED
Box 14 Flourtown, Pa. 19031
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*

ANN ARBOR LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS
presents
CANDIDATES NIGHT
HEAR CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATES
ASK THEM QUESTIONS
THURS., MAR. 23-7:45 P.M.
City Council Chambers
City Hall-2nd Floor
--LISTEN IF YOU CANNOT ATTEND-
-ON WPAG RADIO-
(F.M. 107.1)

r .......... t,
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HARVEY MUST GO
WE HAVE AN ALTERNATIVE
FOR SHERIFF WHO CAN WIN!
FRED POSTILL
Come and hear POSTILL discuss his plans
at a mass meeting TUESDAY, MARCH 21
(tonight) at 7:30 in 3532 SAB.
If you can't make the meeting and want to help, if only for a
few hours, call 663-4573 or stop in at 6111h S. Forest, between
1 and 4, Monday through Friday.
STUDENTS FOR POSTILL COMMITTEE
WE CAN WIN, BUT ONLY IF YOU HELP
a paid political advertisement

CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

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Students and University Community

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EARN 3-10 HOURS CREDIT

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INFORMATION:

662-6666

Students Abroad
211 Michigan Theatre Bldg.

Drunk drivers bring families together.
In hospital rooms and at funerals.
Because that's where the drunk driver's victims wind up.
Drunk drivers are involved in at least 25,000 deaths and 800,000
crashes every year.
And what can you do?
Remember, the drunk driver, the abusive drinker, the problem drinker
may be sick and need your help.
The first thing you can do is get him off the road. For his sake and yours.
Do something. Write the National Safety Council, Dept. A, 425 North
Michigan Ave., Chicago, Illinois, 60611. And your voice will be heard.
Scream Bloody Murder. , T ,
Advertising contributed for the public goad.
e University of Michigan
Russian and East European Studies
and ' <
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cordially invite you to a lecture by
tile Sir Steven R Uncinfian"
es Lecturer-Queen's University, Belfast
On
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