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March 21, 1972 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-21

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 21, 1972

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, March 21, 1972

LSA govt. elections open today

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI.N
.*.. . ..** m m*....*. m*.*, . . m...*., . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(Continued from Page 1)
fication that future amendments{
will become effective.
Robert Stephens '73 and Carl'
Helstein '73 are the Action Man-
date Party candidates for presi-
dent and vice-president. Action{
Mandate candidates for member-
at-large are Susan Menster '74,
Charles Barquist '75 and Diane
Yapko '73.
The party, which currently has
six members on the LSA Council,
hopes to gain equal student-facul-
ty vote on the literary college's
LSA administration board accord-
ing to its platform. At present,j
students sit on the board but have
no vote.
Furthermore, Action Mandate
members hope to utilize LSAl
council's right to appoint stu-
dents to the LSA Curriculum
Committee as a means of revis-
ing distribution requirements and
eventually abolishing the grading
system.
The PESC ticket is led by Di-
ane Rapaport '74 for president and
Jay Rising '74 for vice-president.
The party's member-at-large can-
didates are Dean Wilcox '75, Su-
san Paul '73, Ben Romer '74, Jim
Weinstein '75, and Judith Lashofi
'75.
The top priority the PESC party
lists is to open the University to
members of the non-University
community Rapaport believes
that while the University's func-
tion should be to train people to
work with the community at large,
it is currently training students to
act as rulers.
PESC members favor a number
DANGEROUS REPTILE
The most poisonous snake may
be the tawny colored Australian
tiger snake (Notechs scutatus)
which has a normal lethal dose
of a mere two milligrams-1/14,000
oz. Between 30-40,000 people are
annually killed by snakes. Burma
is the most dangerous country for
snakes with a mortality rate of
15.4 deaths per 100,000 people per
year.
Subscribe to

of educational changes, including
the creation of more courses which
are concerned with the issue of
social change and more opportuni-
ties for independent study, resi-
dential lea:ning, and independent
majors.
The Rational Alternative Par-
ty RAP is represented by Howard
Victor '73 and Ruth Pew '74 in the
presidential and vice presidential
races and by Stuart Allen Weiner
'75, William Crawforth '74, Pa-
trick Heller '74, Mark Wood '76,
and Alan Harris '73 in the mem-
ber-at-large contest.
RAP's main objective, mem-
bers say, is to find out what theI
students want done and then to
do it. RAP members plan to con-
duct LSA-wide surveys at regu-
lar intervals to determine exactly
what student desires are.
Victor, who believes that the
University is basically "pretty
good the way it is." opposes com-
plete abolition of the grading sys-
tem but support a simplification
of distribution requirements and!
more pass-fail options for peo-
ple who want them.
Victor insists that LSA fundsI
must serve educational, nonpoliti-
cal purposes. He says that someI

money could be donated to aca-
demic-reform minded groups such
as PESC, but only if money re-
mained after more important
needs were met.
Jim Glickman '75 and Bobs
Hersh '75 are running. for presi-
dent and vice-president and the
GRASP ticket. Judy Barton '75,;
Debbie Wagner '75, Jane Levine
'75, Judy Heck '75, and John Stu-
art '75 are the GRASP candidates
for member-at-large.
GRASP members propose that a
number of committees be formed
to investigate various topics, in-
cluding the elimination of the
foreign language requirement, the
revision of the grading system,
and the revision to distribution
requirements.
Informations gathered by these
committees would then be pre-
sented to the appropriate LSA
committee and attempts would be
made to ensure ratification of
motions based on this informa-
tion.
One point of agreement between
rmembers of all four parties is that
LSA council must issue a news
letter in order to end the wide-
spread ignorance concerning the
council's activities.

Day Calendar
TUESDAY, MARCH 2i
Computing Ctr. Short Course: "An
Introduction to the Loader in MTS,"
Seminar Rm., Comp. Ctr., 3 p.m.
LS&A Coffee Hour: 2549 LSA Bldg.,
3 p.m.
Near East. Langs. & Lits.: S.D. Goi-
tein, Princeton, "Interfaith Relations:
Ae om eed in the Writings ofthe

cannot be accepted; two other oppor-
tunities to apply - Oct. 1972 and Jan.
1973; student expected to have clear
statement of res. prob. together with
estimated cost of each major expendi-
ture connected with it; project should
have been reviewed by members of doc-
toral comm. or chairman of dept.: ob-
tain format for submission in Fellow-
ship Ofc., Rackham 1014; call 764-2218.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 S.A.B.

POCKET
BILLIARDS
"its worth learning"
Free Instruction
Thurs. 7-9 P.M.
MICH. UNION

U of M PHOTO SERVICES
" PHOTOGRAPHY-PR I NTS
f OZALI DS-PHOTOSTATS
s PHOTO SUPPLIES

f

Rm. 540 L.S.A. Bldg.

764-9216

Try Daily

Clossiftieds

CM Lan Interview appts. still available for
Bidg., 4:10 p.m. some organizations coming this week;
Kelsey Museum Lecture:R.T.mS.ott3 3to:by our office to sign up. or call
Kelsy MseumLecure R.T Sctt.763-13~68: The May Co., Prudential Life
Bryn Mawr College, "The Excavations Ins.' (sales), Motor Mutual Ins. (sales),
of a Typical Italian Town from the lko- W.A.C's, Dade Div. of Amer. Hosp.
man Republic .." 35 Angell Hall, 4:10 Supply,sNat'l C.S.S., Inc., John Han-
p.m.[ cock ins. Appts. may be made for the
Music School: Japanese Naganta Mu- following organizations coming week of
ic, lecture and demonstration, Rackham March 27: Teacher Corps, Wayne State
Aud., 8 p.m. Univ. (sci. backgrounds only), Pruden-
tial Life., Aetna Life Ins.

I

jGeneral Notices
G r a d u a t e Student Dissertation
Grants: Make application through clos-
ing date of Apr. 10, '72; late applics.

SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 S.A.B.
Interview: Davey Tree, Kent, Ohio,
Fri., Mar. 24, 10 to 5; interested in stu-
dents in the fields of forestry, horti-
culture, and landscaping; register in
person or call 763-4117.

MA RCH ART FAIR
WHEN: Sunday, March 26, 12-6 RM.
WHERE: Michigan Union Ballroom
WHAT-, Artists Displaying and Selling Their Crafts
WHO: Open to Everyone; No Admission Charge
ARTISTS: If you are interested in selling or displaying your work at the March Art Fair,
stop in at room 240 Michigan Union or call 764-7409 for information and registration.
Registration deadline is March 24.

1

i

SPEAK HEBREW?

a little?

a lot?

fluently?

DISCUSSION AND SLIDES ON
PRE-INCA AND INCA ART
presented by JIM BENNETv
AND
PERUVIAN DINNER
'JIIURSDAY, MARCH 23-6:30 p. .
Ecumenical Center-921 Church Street
Reservations must be made by March 22 fl
Call-Days 662-5529 Nights 763-6213 Cost $1.00 _
b< ______>g --> <---o ---o ---> m o o o

I
i
'I
i

Hebrew will be the language of the weekend
MARCH 24-26
at CAMP TAMARACK, Ortonville, Mich.
at the
College Student Hebrew Retreat
ACTIVITIES INCLUDE:
* Discussions on literature, immigration, Black Panthers, and
Israeli Army
" Israeli folk dancing and singing, a party, a movie
" Nature hikes and outdoor recreation
Resource people include Israeli's of varied backgrounds
SPECIAL GUEST IS EZRI UVAAL
REGISTER NOW
Send $12.00, your name, address, and phone to:
COLLEGIATE HEBREW WEEKEND
c/o Terry Kohen
18100 Meyers
Detroit, Mich. 48235
For further information call: Tzviah Iden, 761-4037

$

SPONSORED BY: STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
OFFICES OF SPECIAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS

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The Michigan

Daily

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For a subscription
call 764-0558
Enjoy It

People are not just the cause
of the"population problem."
They're also the victims.

0

_ I
YOGI
E BHAJAN
~ {.
i/
At
i i

Traffic jams. Overcrowded
schools. Inadequate housing.
Increasing unemployment.
Pollution. Almost any urban,
social and environmental
problem you can name is fast
becoming a nightmare.
And in one way or another
affects us all.
Of course, these problems
would still exist even if popula
tion growth were zero, because
population growth is not their
basic cause. Therefore solving
thre must obviously become
society's number one priority.
However, the pressures of an
ever-increasing population tend
to intensify our problems. And
make them harder to solve.
(fly the year 2000, Census
Bureau projections estimate
our population could grow close
to 300 million. That's about 100
million more people to house,
transport, educate, feed and
clean up after !)
This intensifying of problems
by sheer numbers of people can
also occur in individual house-
holds. For just as " too many
people" make society's problems
more difficult to solve, the
problems of raising a family
are not made easier when there
are "too many children."
Under the circumstances, we
feel there's only one reason for

There's also only one time to
have that child : when it's
wanted. When it can be a
welcome addition rather than
an accidental burden.
Unfortunately, research has
consistently shown that not
enough Americans (from everyj
walk of life) are aware of the'
benefits of family planning.
Or even how to go about it.
That's what we're all about.
And frankly, we can use all
the help we can get.,-
Especially from thoughtful
people who understand how
unplanned pregnancies can
intensify the already severe
problems society has still
to solve.
People who will, at the very
least, help others understand
that the population problem not
only has a cause. It has victims.

*p

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