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March 19, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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UAC-DAYSTAR presents

KRIS KRISTOFFERSON
APRIL 21, FRI. (last day of classes)

ne-ws briefs
by The Associated Press
THE WHITE HOUSE announced yesterday a program to
provide more than I million summer jobs for youths aged 14
to 21.
More than $319 million in federal funds will be provided for the
job program. Most of the jobs will be for nine weeks at $1.60 an
hour, it is said.
The total of 1,070,400 ,summer youth jobs is 89,000 more than
last year's summer program the administration said.

C14C

Sfriiigan

DaliA;

$1.50-$3.00-$4.50

Ann Arbor, Michigan Sunday, March 19, 1972
POW's await *
Bangladesh
recOgni~tin

Reserved Seats go on sale tomorrow, Monday, 20th at
Michigan Union at 12 noon

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lorry no checks

MARCH 19
IN CONJUNCTION WITH WORLD WEEK
UNITED NATIONS SYMPOSIUM
"The Peace Keeping Role of the U.N."
DR. JAMES 0. C. JONAH
from Sierra Leone. Political Advisor to Gunnar Jarring s
Middle East Mission

PRIME MINISTER EDWARD HEATH asked President Georges DACCA () - India and Bang-
Pompidou for an explanation yesterday of his call upon French- ladesh warned Pakistan on Satur-
men to decide whether they want an enlarged Common Market day that no Pakistani war prison-
with Britain and others as members. ers will be returned home until
Pompidou came to London for a weekend summit on policies for President Zulfikar Ali Bhutto re-
expanding the Common Market after calling for the French refer- cognizes Bangladesh.
endum on the eve of his visit to Britain. This is the first time the gov-
* * ernments of India and Bangladesh
POLISH NEWSPAPERS yesterday urged a massive voter have linked the return of the
turn-out today in support of the economic reforms of Communist ter the Pakistan army surrendered
leader Edward Gierek. in Dacca last December. with re-
Since Gierek took power 15 months ago he has tried to ease acognition.
economic discontent among his countrymen by providing a wide
variety of household goods and foods in the stores. disclosed that his government had
This relative abundance contrasts with the Wladyslaw Gomulka drawn up a list of 1,500 Pakistani
regime of two years ago. The 67-year old Gomulka fell from power military men against whom war
in December 1970 during bloody food price riots, crimes have been lodged, but it
* * will be checked further. India
MASSACHUSETTS CORRECTIONS OFFICIALS began con- holds about 90,000 Pakistani war
ferences yesterday with rebellious inmates at Wapole State Prison prisoners.
following a riot that authorities said had racial overtones. The Indian-Pakistani warning on
An estimated 150 inmates burned the prison library, smashed war prisoners was announced at
windows, furniture and television- sets and set fires in the debris. the epd of two days to talks be-
According to Police Commissioner John Boone the outburst ap- tween Prime Minister Indira Gan-
parently grew out of the stabbing of 'a black inmate. dhi of India and Prime Minister
~ . Mujibur Rahman of Bangladesh.
Bhutto has called on India to uni-
SOUTH VIETNAMESE forces reported uncovering tons of
enemy supplies in eastern Cambodia yesterday, the ninth day of laterally repatriate the Pakistani
their spoiling operation there. prisoners as a gesture of good
The spoiling operation involves 8,000 men in an area northwest of will.

2 P.M.

UNION BALLROOM

"The United Nations:t
Past Achievements, Future Hopes"t
A PANEL DIALOGUE
JEROLD M. DESMOND
from the United Natons, Economic and Social Affairs expert
on Urban Development
DR. LLOYD HUGHESa
Visiting Professor, School of Education, previously associated
with UNESCO
DR. HAROLD MAGNUSON
Assoc. Dean, School of Public Realth; Consultant to WHO
3:15 UNION BALLROOM
"Soviet Foreign Policy and the United Nations"
AMBASSADOR V. SAFRONCHUCK
from the USSR delegation to the United Nations
8:00 P.M. UNION BALLROOM
Ambassador Safronchuck's speech will be followed by a discus-
sion, questions, etc., from the audience.
ALL PROGRAMS ARE FREE!
Sponsored by the Foreign Student Board
IUILD
This Afternoon and Monday Only
THE MIDWEST PREMIERE OF
VIVA LA MEURTE
Directed by FERNANDO ARRABAL
(in French with English subtitles)
In 1932, amidst the daily regularity of Spanish (
Morroco, Fernando Arrabal was born. He did not
cry, not even when the midwife spanked him, I
however he did open= his eyes with tremendous
determination and after taking a good-look at his
surroundings, appeared to be trying to turn back
to the darkness from which he had just been so
violently separated.-Observing the newly born,
his father exclaimed: "I was never in Babal."j
EAST QUAD AUDITORIUMt
-TODAY AT 3:30 P.M.
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
-MONDAY AT 7 AND 9 P.M. 75c
Tickets Will Be Sold at BOTH DOORS beginning at 5:30 p.m.

SEN. EDMUND MUSKIE sign
there to campaign for the Illir

Saigon and 10 to 15 miles inside Cambodia.
T HE BLACK FILM SOCIETY
exploring black images in film
PRESENTS
LECTURE-

I

Harold Cruise
"Blacks in Film"
FEATURES:
King Kong
Thief of Baghdad
MARCH 20

MLB-Room B-115
4-5:30 P.M.

Meanwhile President Zulfikar Ali 1 TV1 t4UkL X.- \~/
Bhutto of Pakistan mended fences
with the Soviet Union and hope-
fully laid the groundwork for ; c u
peace moves on the Indian sub- C1uei1
continent on his brief visit to
Moscow that ended yesterday. CHICAGO (P) - Tuesday's Illi-
Bhutto flew back to Pakistan nois primary gives former Minne-
satisfied that Soviet-Pakistani re- sota Sen. Eugene McCarthy a
schance to prove himself a serious
lations had returned to normal af- contender for , the Democratic
ter months of tension due to Krem- presidential nomination.
lin support of India in its war It also is Maine Sen. 'Edmund
with Pakistan in December and Muskie's (D-Maine) chance to
backing of Bangladesh independ- polish a winning image tarnished
in the Florida primary. ,
ence.
Sen. George McGovern (D-S.D.)
Though there was "no active is the third man with a big stake
Soviet involvement in mediation," in the confusing dual primary -
spokesman said, "they have as- composed of one race he calls a
suredusthttheywanteacein"glamour contest" and a second
ebattle for delegate seats.
the region and will do whatever is 1Muskie and McCarthy are mat-
conducive to achieving it." ched at the top of the ticket pre-
! I - - - - ----_---- - --_--_-_

s autographs in Joliet, Illinois yesterday after appearing at a rally
nois primary Tuesday.
Mc1arthy face
Illinois primary

6:30 & 10:00 P.M.
8:00 P.M.

LECTURE RM

1

MODERN LANGUAGE BUILDING
Ann Arbor Civic Theater
presents
ANTIGONE
by JEAN ANOU I LH
March 22-25-8:00 P.M.
March 26-7:00 P.M.
TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT BOX OFFICE
Help Celebrate the Coming of Spring-
Come to the

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- ferential race which has no im-
- pact on the composition of the 160-
member Illinois delegation to the
> national convention.
Muskie and McGovern, on the
other hand, are after delegate
seats as Illinois voters, for t h e
first tim'e, elect 160 delegates ei-
ther committed to a candidate or
listed as uncommitted. Ten others
will be chosen at-large at a later
date by state party leaders..
Muskie is a clear-cut favorite to
win both races but the margins of
victory are questionable.
Muskie won only 9 per cent in
Florida's primary, whilerAlabama
Gov. George Wallace captured 43
per cent. The Maine senator is
seeking a big victory over Mc-
Carthy to replenish his dwindling
campaign chest as well as boost
his winning image.
The Illinois primary could crip-
ple McCarthy's hopes for the nom-
ination and give the former Min-
nesota senator the impetus to form
a third party, a. plan he h-is hint-
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $11 by -mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.
tion rates: $5 by carrier' $6 by mail.

Have some lime on

k/
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your hands?.
Truck on down to the
#/ Daily and join the Busi-

ed at often during two weeks of
campaigning, mostly in the Chi-
cago area.
McCarthy has concentrated his
campaign in Illinois, hoping that
strong showing in the top of the
ticket race there will enhance his
national image and ensure suc-
cesses in future primaries.
McCarthy has 39 delegates en-
tered in the race but he informally
cut them adrift two weeks ago to
concentrate on the "glamour con-
test." He appears to have spent
more on television ads than eith-
er Muskie or McGovern.
Sen. Edmund Muskie accelerat-
ed his campaign for votes in the
Illinois primary with several ral-
lies yesterday in the Chicago area,
joking with crowds and stressing
economic issues. One campaign
poster reminded voters: "Illinois
is not Florida."
He unveiled a two-prong strat-
egy resulting from Florida; he is
lumping Wallace and President
Nixon together and blaming tnem
for rising inflation and the slug-
gish economy.
McGovern and McCarthy made
separate appearances during the
weekly meeting of the Rev. Jesse
Jackson's new organization, Peo-
ple to Save Humanity, aind were
both greeted enthusiastically.
The secretary of state's office
predicted that two million voters
will cast ballots Tuesday, which
would be a record for an Illinois
primary.
This is the first Illinois primary
that has attracted presidential
contenders. In the past, the April
date of the primary was too late
to be a signpost for future con-
tests and the winner still iad to
wait for party leaders to decide
on endorsements.
TV & Stereo Rentals
$10.00 per month
;JO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

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,

ness Staff

See FRAN at 420 Maynard
M-F 10-12, M-W-F 2-4, or Call 764-0560

I

FF
ou

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
WED., MARCH 22
4-6 P.M.
4th Floor Rackham

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FRI.
& SAT.
MARCH
24-25

Donuts and Cider for all

"SUPERB"-N.Y. Times
0 0000 000*0000000000000000000000
* Juilliard Repertory Company 0
000000000000000 0000000 00000000
"WOMEN BEWARE WOMEN" "INTElVIEW"«
by Thomas~ Middleton by Jean-Claude van rat LC
The celebrated dramatic classic. T (Author o" America Hurrah")
_ and
taa an it o*r of"THE INDIAN WANTS
THE BRONX"
ONE PERFORMANCE by Israel Horowt.i
EACH 2 maeor contemporary plays
8:00 P.M.

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ANNOUNCES REPLACEMENTS FOR CANCELLED SCHEDULED FILMS
TUESDAY--MARCH 21-
BREWSTER McCLOUD'S FLYING MACHINE will NOT be shown. INSTEAD we will show

11

"

BryanmForbes's compy
mad-cap comedy:

DIAL 668-6416
HELD OVER!
TWO HIT
ENCORES

THE

WRONG

BOX

PLEASE Don't be disappointed-ORDER NOW!

with MICHAEL CAINE, PETER SELLERS, JOHN MILLS, RALPH RICHARDSON,
and PETER COOK and DUDLEY MOORE (of "BEDAZZLED")
"So fantastic and explosive that it virtually pops right out of the screen! A crazy, merry tale . . . Somewhere between black
humor and elegant, uninhioited camp"-The New York Times
"A Victorian romp, continually diverting."-Hollis Alpert, Saturday Review
"Take a number of Britain's top talents, add one part Oscar Wilde, to two parts Mack Sennett, mix with melodrama, romance,
high comedy and hysteria, serve it with stylish wit in a lovely-to-look-at Victorian setting and you wind up with . . . the right
movie and an irresistibly delicious delight."-Judith Crist, NBC Today Show
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S TEN BEST"-Judith Crist, New York World Journal Tribune; Joseph Morgenstern, Newsweek
Based on the novel by Robert Lewis Stevenson and Lloyd Osborne. Music by John Barry
FUNERAL AND MILITARY AIRS played by THE TEMPERANCE SEVEN

Arthur Kopit
INDIANS
POWER CENTER
MARCH 29-APRIL 1

,u
, P

NOMINATED
FOR

6

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ACADEMY
AWARDS
"Summer of '42"
BEST EDITING
BEST SCREENPLAY
BEST PHOTOGRAPHY
REST cZCYnP

Price Wed. Thu. Fri. Sat. No. Office Use
I . 5 ~ - _-_ -- __ _____

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