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March 18, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 18, 1912

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, March 18, 1972

Detroit mayor, police commissioner say
controversial STRESS unit will be kept

. SPEEDY SHIPWRIGHTS
n s fail to ac The fastest constructiontime for
IV a sea going vessel is the 4 days
15o hours of a World War II
on IM o housing units

DETROIT (I)-Detroit's two top
law enforcement officers yesterday
rejected suggestions that they
abolish the controversial police
unit STRESS whose guns have
taken 14 lives in little over a year.
Mayor Roman Gribbs and Police
Commissioner John Nichols said
STRESS operation was a valuable
tool in fighting street crime and
released figures showing t h a t
crime in Detroit was down for the
sixth consecutive month.
The mayor and commissioner
Nichols said, however, that they

would make changes in the oper- will be required to repeat all
ations of the plain-cloties unit, phases of a firearms qualification
whose members often act as de- test which evaluates their response
coys in high crime areas in efforts to situations of potential danger as
to trap lawbreakers. flash cards are screened in front
Commissioner Nichols said that of them to test their reaction time.
the STRESS unit would be con- STRESS operations have come
tinued on a reduced basis for a under fire of the Michigan Civil
while and that all officers now Rights Commission, the NAACP.
assigned to STRESS will be given, and the Guardians, a statewide
psychological tests by medical organization of predominantly
teams to make certain they are black police officers. They pointed
and continue to be mentally ad- out that all but one of those killed
justed to the job. by STRESS officers were black.
In addition, all STRESS officers The controversial unit has been

Speech by presidential consultant
disrupted over Indochina air war

A speech by a presidential con-
sulant became the scene for a
confrontation between P e o p 1 e
Against the Air War (PAAW) and
some members of the audience last
night, when PAAW asked if it
could show a slide presentation on
the electronic air war in Indo-
china.
Following a talk given by Wil-,
liam Magruder, a special consult-
ant to President Nixon on tech-
nology, PAAW members were al-

lowed to address the first ques-
tion to the presidential advisor.
PAAW members, however, went
up on stage and began to criticize
Magruder's speech. PAAW mem-
ber Arlene Griffin disagreed with
Magruder's statements that the
Indochina war was "winding
down." Griffin said that the war
was not winding down because of
the way technology was put to use
by the Nixon administration.
PAAW member Paul Teich then

Youth alleges rape in jail

(Continued from Page 1)
One of those accused has a his-
tory of five felony convictions,
sources close to the case disclosed.
Sheriff Douglas Harvey, who is
in charge of the jail, could not be
reached for comment on the case
yesterday. A sheriff's department
official said he was acting as a
consultant on Michigan's~ jails at
a Memphis, Tenn. conference.
The alleged incident raises a
number of questions, including:
-Why a 17-year-old, who had
never been in jail before, was in-
carcerated with much older men,
some of them hardened criminals;
-Why jail officials failed to
discover the alleged assault until
four days after it happened;
-Why the felony charges were
apparently first brought in 14th
District Court in Chelsea, and not
in the city's 15th district court

where the alleged offenses occur-
red; and
-What safeguards would be
taken to insure that there is no
repetition of the alleged events to
other inmates.
Harvey himself has said he
wants to build a new jail, but
plans for it are still only forma-
tive.
In the past few months, Harvey
has had an expensive closed-cir-
cuit television monitoring system
installed in several county jail
cells. However, the system is ap-
parently ineffective when the
lights in the cells are turned off,
as they are at night.
Harvey also has audio monitors
in the cells. There has been no ex-
planation as to why these failed
to pick up the sound of the alleged
kangaroo court.

suggested the audience might stay
to see the group's slide show, ask-
ing the audience to vote on when
-it would like to see it.
About 50 people indicated they
would like to stay after the dis-
cussion to see the show. One of
the program's organizers indicated
the group could use the Rackham
Auditorium facilities after the dis-
cussion was over.
The discussion session began
and PAAW member Bob Phillips
charged that Magruder was a
"liar and a fool" for denying
knowledge of the use of technol-
ogy in Vietnam.
A member of the a u di e n c e
shouted, "You're subverting this
whole thing. This isn't what we
came here for."
Phillips responded by saying,
"You're afraid to hear the truth.
You're afraid to see the slidel
show."I
Atsthat point, a member of the
audience rushed to the micro-
phone and pushed Phillips from
the mike. When a female PAAW
member tried to intervene, she too
was pushed aside. She shouted,
"This is your kind bf democracy!"
The man and many other mem-
bers of the audience left, while
the discussion of Magruder's
speech went on until an organizer
from the engineering school cut
the questions short to let the slide,
show proceed.
Magruder's speech was co-spon-
sored by the Federation of Ameri-
cans Supporting S c i e n c e and
Technology (FASST) and the en-
gineering college.

very much in the news since March
9 when three STRESS officers -
ironically working on a non-STRESS
detail on that particular shift-
got into a mixed up shootout with
five Wayne County sheriff's depu-
ties with one deputy killed and
three wounded.
An investigation is underway in-
to the incident which occurred
when the three STRESS officers
saw a man with a gun walking
towards an apartment building.
They reportedly followed him, to
an apartment where some depu-
ties and a civilian were having a
friendly card game.
Neither side recognized the other
as police officers and shooting
broke out, with several uniformed
Detroit police officers responding
to the "officers under gunfire"
call.
The Wayne County prosecutor's
office originally said a report on
the shooting, with possible recom-
mendations for criminal action,
would be released yesterday but;
prosecutor's aides said they needed
a little more time to collect evi-'
dence and receive crime labora-
tory reports on the shooting.
One of the wounded deputies-
Henry Duvall of Detroit-said,
"The authorities are trying to
whitewash the investigation .
they are trying to delay it in
hopes it will go away."
World's Fair
opens here
(Continued from Page 1)
dents in the U.S. have been ac-
tively criticizing their home re-
gime in the last few years.
Houseini claims that many dis-
sidents have been executed by the
Iranian government in recent
months. Subsequent protests have
been stifled, he says, as evidenced
by the outlawing of a several
thousand member student union.
Much of the spirit of World
Wee; is summed up by Farid
Hariri, a student at the Univer-
sity's English Language Institute.
"Until recently I had very little
understanding of my role in this
country," says Hariri. "These ac-
tivities have helped put it in per-
spective."

The revised classified research Board makes a review by the
policy passed by the Regents ap- Board necessary or desirable."
plies to three types of research: "A main effect of this proposal,"
-Research which "limits open said psychology Prof. Warren Nor-
publication of the results of re- man, chairman of Senate Assem-
search beyond approximately one bly, the faculty representative
year"; body, "will be to make people
-Research which restricts the doing the research think before
publication of information about submitting a proposal."
research sponsors or "the purpose Thre Rgnsvtdls ot
and scope of the proposed re-tor Ject the Assembly's proposals
search"; and for revised University classified
sarc";eseandresearch restrictions, calling in-
-"Research, the clearly foresee- stead for revision in the applica-
able and probable result of which, tion of the current policies.
the direct application of which or Assembly's proposal called for
any specific purpose of which, is the University not to enter into
to destroy human life or to in- oheneianotrtorgrnt
capacitate human beings." which wuld rescontrtoen ublia-
In addition, the policy lists pro- tion of results of classified or pro-
cedural steps to be followed in're- prietary research beyond approxi-
viewing classified search r pro- mately one year.
jects, except that research con- The Regents charged the execu-
ducted at Willow Run Laboratories tive officers to work with the Sen-
will be reviewed under the policies ate Advisory Committee on Uni-
established by the Regents in 1968. versity Affairs, the Assembly and
The guidelines require an in- Student Government Council, to
itial review by the supervisor of Student Goern Conc
theresarch uitin hic th Ipresent a policy in accordance
the research unit in which the I with the Regents' views.
project will be conducted. The iThese views included separation
proposal will then be referred to of proprietary and classified re-'
a committee composed of the vice- ;earch and establishment of a
president for research, two fac-serhan statishmetanism
ulty members and one student. pr administrative mechanism
If anyone involved in the review
process believes "that there is a The highest Totem Pole in the
substantial question as to the
proposal's compliance" with the world is in McKinleyville, Calif. It
new research guidelines, the pro- weighs 57.000 lbs. and is 160 feet
posal will be referred to the fac- high.
- - -- - _ _

(Continued from Page i)
No one will be allowed to re-
apply for a space in either Gom-
berg or Bush House of South Quad
or the Stockwell cor.ridor desig-
nated by the proposal, until it
has been determined who is elig-
ible to live on these floors.

ulty Committee on Research Pol-
icies, which will make a final
recommendation to the vice-presi-
dent for research.
The regents however, yesterday
voted to reserve the right to re-
view the policy for any reason
which "in the opinion of the

a
3
li
J

I

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Lw/E E I EuUI1
You'll Enjoy It
Ribeye Steak
Lunch $1.39
3035 Washtenaw across from Lee Oldsmobile

environmenlal
design
BFA Programs
Certificate Programs
For info contact registrar
Parsons
School of Design
66 West 12 St.,.New York 10011

PINBALL W1Z~$.
DONWT ,,.$ {
PINBALL WIZARDS
602 E. WILLIAM
in Mark's Coffeehouse
**Officially sanctioned by the
American Pinball Association

*

i
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i
t
i

..----.......

PIRGIM funding plan
approved by Regents

ALL CARS
GREATLY
REDUCED!
PONTIAC '68 Le Mans Con-
vert. V-8 Automatic, Power
Steering, Brakes, Red, White
Top, Extra Clean
MUSTANG '66 6-Clyinder Au-
tomatic, Power Steering, Very
Clean
MAVERIC '70 2-Door, 6-Cylin-
der, Stick, Blue, Clean
AMBASSADOR '68 2 - Door
Hardtop, V-8 Automatic, Pow-
er Steering, Brakes, Factory
Air, New Tires, Very Clean
CORTINA '67, Automatic, 20,-
000 miles
FIAT '69 Roadster, New Top,
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TOYOTA '71 Corolla Coupe,
Automatic, Factory Air, 7,000
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T O Y OT A '71 Carollawagan,
1600, Blue - Green, 4 - Speed,
Nice!
TOYOTA '71 Corolla 2-Door,
Red, 4-Speed, Clean Car
TOYOTA '70 Hi-Lux Pickup,
Camper Cap, Rear Step Bump-
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20 MPG.
TOYOTA '69 Corolla 2-Door,
4-Speed, Radio, New Tires,
27-32 MPG.

I

I

JERRY (Gerald)
DE GRI ECK
CITY COUNCIL-First Ward
VOTE HRP
APRIL 3 °

"Ann Arbor Is Not Planned for People
-and It's Time for a Change,
I WILL WORK FOR:
* Comprehensive transportation ssytem that serves
ALL areas of the city.
* Responsible, planned city growth in line with eco-
logical considerations and the needs of the poor.
* Parks and recreation facilities long needed in the
first ward.
* No more destructve projects like Packard-Beakes by-

pass.

Paid Political Adv.

*

(Continued from Pas1)
sought to be made subject to the
fee assessment."
Yellin said that PIRGIM has al-
ready collected signatures of over.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
SATURDAY, MARCH 18
Day Calendar
Swimming: Region VI A.A.U. Cham-,
pionships, Matt Mann Pool, 10 am.,
finals 7 pm.
PTP: "Company," Power Center, 2,1
8pm.
University P 1 a y e r s: Friedman's
"Steambath," Arena Theatre, Frieze
Bldg., 8 pm.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society Small
Co.: "Thespis or the Gods Grown Old,"
Residential Coll. Aud., 8 pm.
CARE PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 AB
Info, about following annets. avail-
able at CPP in the Career PlanningLi-
brary or by calling 764-6338:
LOWELL TECH. INST., Prog. in
Mgmt. Science, designed to equip the
engineer and scientist to assume man-
agerial responsibilities in rapidly
changing tech. and social environments.
Deadline April 15.
RENSSELAER POLYTECH. INST. Prog.
in Public Mgmt. to prepare technolog.
educated student for career in public
service.
NEW YORK UNIV., Institute of En-
vironmental Medicine offers M.S. and'
Ph.D. degrees in several fields of en-
vironmental health. Wide variety of
backgrounds applicable. Deadline June
1.
KATHARINE GIBBS SCHOOL, secre-
tarial training scholarships, available
for students with mini, of two years.
college work,
ARIZONA STATE UNIV., Grad Assist-
antships in Educational Technology,
specialize either in instructional re-
search and dev. or educational media.
Deadline June 15. Also School Library'
Media Program, new experimental pro-,
gram either for seniors to receive BA
in Educ. with minor in school library
media, or for grads to receive M.A.
in Educ. with specialization in school
library media.
I A.l

16,000 of the almost 32,000 stu-
dents on the Ann Arbor campus.
The petition states that the signer
supports the organization and its,
proposed activities.E
Another criterion set up by the'
Regents states that the organiza-
tion "must be non-partisan and
demonstrate d i r e c t educational
benef its in which all students at
the University have an opportunity
to participate."
The fee collection service will
be discontinued "if less than one
third of the students choose to
financially support the organiza-
tion for two consecutive terms (ex-;
clusive of summer terms) ." 1
The Regents voted, however, to
grant PIRGIM an exception to this
rule by allowing the organization
an extra year to demonstrate fi-
nancial support from over a third
of the students.
The extension was suggested by
Allan Smith, vice president for
academic affairs, in order to give
PIRGIM a chance to "prove them-
selves" to the student body.
Any organization using Univer-
sity billing services must also re-
imburse the University for all ad-
ministrative costs incurred in col-
lecting the funds, the Regents also
decided.
Though already incorporated as
a non-profit, non-partisan organi-
zation, PIRGIM has not yet begun
its activities. After the eight-
memb'er board of directors is
elected by University students in
next week's SGC election, the or-
ganization will begin considering
plans of action, according to
Yellin.
PIRGIM hopes to establish local
organizations on college campuses
throughout the state. The top six
vote-getters in next week's elec-
tion will constitute a state board
of directors and will coordinate
state-wide activities.
IO~e
FLARES
Your
Choice
$5

Do You Really

Want T
Teach?
0 Unique Opportunity for Term Ill-A
" Work with an entire elementary school
staff and 3 University faculty members
9 Satisfy certification requirements for so-
cial and psychological foundations of
education
0 8 hours credit, L300 and C390
* Limited to 35 enrollment. You must have
Junior standing.

"THE WORLD IS WHAT WE MAKE IT"
WORLDO'S FAIR
Angell Elementary School
(On South U. between Washtenaw and Oxford)
COME TALK TO US TONIGHT
International Coffee House
Variety Show & Exhibits
SAT U R DAY 12-12 SUNDAY 12-6 P.M.
Sponsored by the Foreign Student Board, U of M

TOYOTA
Ann Arbor
OPEN MON. & THURS. TILL 9
907 N. MAIN ST. 663-8567

-

WORSHIP,

*'

* Sign-Up in Room 4112 SEB

L

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCI ENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.--Worship Services. Sunday School
(2-20 years).
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
For transportation call 668-6427.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist and Sermon.
4:00 p.m.--Evening Prayer with the Paulus
Hofhaimer Ensemble.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Services of Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-
Preaching: Robert Sanders.

FIRST UNITED
CHURCH AND
FOUNDATION

METHODIST
WESLEY

State at Huron and Washington
9:30 a.m.-Lenten Contemporary Service.
i1:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover Rupert:
"Obeying Christ's Demands."
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00-noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, March 19:
6:00 p.m.-Dinner, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Celebration, Wesley Lounge.
8:00 p.m.-Attend lecture at Newman Cen-
ter. "Is Your Religion a Neurosis?," Dr.
Edgar Draper, Prof. of Psychiatry.

Monday, March 20:
Noon - Discussion Class, Pine
Christian Faith and the Inner
25c.
Thursday, March 23:
6:00 p.m.-Grad Community.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(LCMS) 1 511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday services at 9:15 and 10:30
Wednesday service at 10:00 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
at 330 Maynard St.
(The Alley/The Conspiracy)
Canterbury House, 11:00 a.m. Meeting at 330
Maynard St. (The Conspiracy). The Eu-
charist. Thankgiving with what is brought:
Bread and Wine, music, the many and the
One. Some friends will be with us to talk
about homosexuality and the church.
"There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is
neither slave nor free, there is neither male
or female, for you are all one in Christ
Jesus." Galatians, 3:28.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Celebration.
11 :00 a m.-Coffee and Conversation in the
Lounge.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Celebration.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Gaede, Minister

4

Room, "The
Life." Lunch

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor-971-3152
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-1 1:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m
Training Hour-6:00 p.m.

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R.

40

E. Simonson

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL

...................'.k .&J~.

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