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March 17, 1972 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-17

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Page Twelve,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 17, 1972

Page Twelve. THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, March 17, 1972

TENSE MEETING:
Regents hear varied opinions
___= a n- -*r - - a .w a i-n -m = --nn ar p n E -m * ~ ~ w--,r

Rep. asks restrictions
on land use in Michigan

over ziiiu to ~ustuigp,

re-1.......i.:.,. .,a 1..... .,, rf., ,.... 11

. 1_ ____ 1 ___.____1_____. .t 11__. T1 Ll: T.. C

(Continued from Page 1) heard members of the Public In-
units) will be a multi-racial ex- terest Research Group in Michi-
perience." gan (PIRGIM) speak on behalf of
their plan to have the.University
She presented a survey in which collect PIRGIM fee assessment.
112 black students, 110 white stu- PIRGIM is a non-profit, non-
dents and 31 other minority stu- p a r t i s a n student organization
dents who plan to return to dorms formed earlier this year to deal
next fall declared they will re- formsucharlemsya omel
side in the new Afro-American With such problems as consumer
sing nint.n Afraud, working conditions, envir-
housing unit. onment, and race and sex dis-
Opposing the plan, Barb Meyer, crimination.
a resident advisor at South Quad, PIRGIM members Mary Viviano
charged that "attempts are beig and Mike Peisner presented a new
made to solve problems within the apd M e eerredete a ne
dor." hecitd eveal tes tatproposal they referred to as a
dorm. She cited several steps that "negative checkoff."
ha been taken to alleviate racial The method of fee assessment
TenionulLpreviously recommended to the
The Jewish Cultural League and petitions that have circulated
the National Association for theperon ttamss cFruay,
AdvnceentofColredPeolearound campus since February,
Advancement of Colored People specified that a mandatory $1.50
also made statements against the would be collected each term dur-
housing units, feeling they were ing registration and refundable
tantamount to segregation. during the third week of that
Milton Robinson, speaking on term.
behalf of MCRC, introduced a The administration rejected this
number of recommendations pro- proposal believing the process
posed by the Commission. should be more voluntary. They
The Commission recommended substituted a . plan of their own in
that eligibility and application which students willing to contrib-
forms be available to all students, ute to the organization would fill
all dormitory staff members should out forms at registration.
be required to attend in-staff P
training on how to deal with ra-! PIRGIM members say that psy-
cial conflict, affirmative effort be dsadvatige te his pb anabe
made to deal with fears of white datage wth han be-
students returning to the dorms cause students would have to fill
and ani annual reevaluation of the out forms to give away money.
program. Instead they developed the idea
The Regents yesterday also of a negative checkoff where only

students unwilling to contribute
the money would fill out the form.
In addition, PIRGIM and ad-'
ministrators developed criteria by
which the Regents could decide
whether to act as the fund-raising
mechanism for an organization.
The group would have to show
petitions of a majority of the stu-
dents on campus. PIRGIM has
done this with 16,000 signatures
having been collected.
In addition, the group would
also have to demonstrate "direct'
educational benefits in which all
students at the University have an
opportunity to participate." Writ-
ten endorsements by a "reason-
able" number of deans and de-
partment chairmen would also
have to be included.
Other requirements include re-
imbursement of the University for
administrative costs, a maximum
$2.00 fee be collected each term,
and that the rights of students
who do not wish to participate
in the program be protected.
In addition to the proposals de-'
bated yesterday, a new plan for a
student judiciary and a revised
research plan will be voted upon
today.

(Continued from Page 1)
more control of land-use, but it's
not practical now because of op-
position from the legislature."
"Our long-term goal would be
state control of land-use," he con-
tinued. "We would like the state
land-use agency to eventually have
veto power similar to the water
power agency. But there are too
many obstacles now and a propo-
sal like that couldn't get through
the legislature."
Richards felt that county ordi-
nances restricting land-use under
the general supervision of the state
agency would be sufficient as an
initial step.
Smit, however, is going ahead
with his bill. He already is re-
ceiving opposition to his proposal.
"The farmer or forest land own-
er wants his tax lowered but is
unwilling to have state restraint
on his ability to resell for a profit
when the right developer comes
along," he said.

Smit expects opposition to the
measure to come not by party
lines but rather by ideology.
"I expect the battle will be
liberal versus conservative, as is
the case of many conservation
bills," he said.
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