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January 18, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-18

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, January 18, 1 -;' 14r

Pae w TE IHIANDIL uedaJauay18_

m

Overdirected ensemble

Na

A now neural foods restaurant:

By FRANCES SCHWARTZ
A chamber orchestra confronts
problems of ensemble, balance,
and intonation to a degree that
a larger orchestra does not. The
Paul Kuentz Chamber Orches-
tra of Paris, under the direction
of Paul Kuentz, met these prob-
lems in a program last night at
the Power Center with varying
effectiveness.
The ensemble consisted of no
more than sixteen string play-
ers- complemented by harpsi-
chord, soprano, and trumpet.
With so few musicians on stage,
one soon had the feeling that
the conductor was to a large
extent non-essential. Indeed, one
wondered whether his mere
presence evidenced a lack of
faith in the ability of the per-
formers to interact to produce
that excitement which is pos-
sible when the direction of the
group is indicated by the con-
certmistress in lieu of an over-
stating and intruding baton.
The music of the evening was
certainly rich with the potential
of this excitement. Works by the
Baroque composers Mouret, Vi-
valdi, Bach, and Telemann can
inspire a vibrancy of spirit by
their unflagging inner pulse and
special development of melodic
sequence. Yet the performers
chose to give a sweet rather
than vibrant interpretation to
these basic elements, and though
beautifully executed and care-
fully controlled, the essential
drive was felt to be lacking.
A Serenade for Strings, writ-
ten by Daniel Lesur in 1954,
provideda contrast to the ear-
lier works, and one felt that the
piece generated more interest in
the performers. Unfortunately,
the work, in three movements,
offered little in the way of mu-
sical substance beyond occasion-
al rhythmic patterns and in-
teresting inner string pizzacato
accompaniment. Rather unin-
spired melodies filled the re-
mainder of the work, rendering
the whole less than innovative.

Solo work by the trumpeter
Jean-Francois Dion in three of
the four Baroque works must
not go unmentioned, for the
clarity of tone, dynamic nuance,
and intonation were remarkably
fine.
After his performance last
week in Hill Auditorium, Soviet
cellist Mstislav Rostropovich in-
dicated his desire to establish a
music scholarship in his name
at the University of Michigan.
Gail Rector, president of the
University Musical Society which
sponsored the cellist's appear-
ance, said yesterday that the
details of the scholarship will
be determined before Rostro-
povich returns to Moscow.
According to Rector, the cel-
list's next concert here will be
dedicated to the scholarship.
Barbara Schlick, the soprano
soloist in Bach's Cantata No. 51,
gave evidence of a light and
pure voice which, though not
consistently strong, was refresh-
ing and well in tune with the
orchestra and trumpet obligato.
No credit was given on the pro-
gram to any but the conductor
and soloists for the evening, and
this seemed an unfortunate
oversight in view of the fine
work done by the first cellist
in her role as the basso con-
tinuo in conjunction with the
harpsichord. The cellist's sense
of phrasing and her under-
standing of her importance
rhythmically in the ensemble
was a major contribution to the

cohesion of the group as a
whole. Indeed, it was easy to
conceive that the otherwise slop-
pily directed ritards through-
out the evening could have been
much more effectively derived
from the cellist's rhythmic im-
pulse than from the conductor's
arbitrarily imposed conception.
It is to Mr. Kuentz's credit to
have brought these musicians
from Paris. It is only a shame
that he did not allow them to
function to their fullest capacity
as true chamber musicians.
DELTA CHI
HAS A PLACE
FOR YOU TO LIVE
OPEN HOUSE
1705 HILL
Jan. 18-Jan. 22
- - -- - -- -

ked Lunch

food as natural as life
inexpensive, carefully prepared.
LUNCH SERVED FROM 11:00-2:30 P.M.
MONDAY-FRI DAY
in the basement of the NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson, 761-1154

.p

I

WE'RE HERE TO HELP

We are professional counselors, available through-
out the day to talk with you' confidentially about:
-Personal Problems
-Difficulties in dealing with
the bureaucracy
-Troubles in relating with other people
-Problem Pregnocies
-Referrals to other community resources
-Anything else you need to talk about
We're here 9 a.m.-5 p.m. every weekday-No ap-
pointment needed. (For help at other hours, call
76-GUIDE). Our service is free for students. Just
come over to:
COUNSELING SERVICES
OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES
THIRD FLOOR, MICHIGAN UNION

-Daily-Sara Krulwich
La Valse. A laudatory study
of French period tragicomedy

i

III

By PENNY SHAW
Directed by John Reed, "La
Valse des toreadors" is an early
twentieth century piece grin-
cante (jarring drama) which
treats the theme of old age and
alienation. The revelation for
a general, convincingly acted by
John Reed, of his futile seven-
teen years of fidelity to his in-
valid wife, serves as the vehicle
for this theme.
Pam Dryen as Ghislaine, who
has shared the General's un-
realistic fantasy approach to life
by faithfully maintaining the
platonic and romantic view that
action and real human contact
will be possible in the indefinite
future, serves as a catalyst by
her unexpected arrival. Dryden
is to be praised for the range
of her acting abilities as she
involves the spectators in her
anger, naivete, and distress.
Betsy Price, as the General's
wife, is also to be commended
for the most gripping perform-
ance of the play through her
realization of the neurotic, in-
fantile wife. David Rutkowski
brought life to the role of the
Doctor, the voice of realism in
the play.
However, the best overall per-
formance of the play was by
Janet Wishnetsky in the roles
of the two maids. She subtly
conveyed a certain impishness

and - as is often typical of
such a role - brought consider-
able humor to the production.
The daughters, played by Mary
Schaffner ;and Anne Temple
were happily appropriate in
their quarrelsome, flirtations
roles, if a bit exaggerated. Jo
Breines, as Gaston,a was among
the better performers, noted for
his gestures of confusion and
anticipation as he contemplates
his first sexual encounter. Chris-
tine White carried her part well
as the local seamstress, making
the spectator believe in the
primacy of her concern for the
feelings of the people involved in
crises. Isabelle Carduner as the
Mother Superior actualized her
role, producing the comic relief.
The stylized early nineteenth
century sets designed by Sherry
Ingles are to be lauded for their
appropriateness to this period
play as well as for the perfectly
splendid bedroom set, which is
a visual feast. Lighting designer
Jo Appelt subtly directed the
spectator's attention from the
whole set to one actor, convey-
ing the altering importance of
group interaction and individual
contemplation. Costumer Brent
Program Information 8-6416
JANE FONDA in
kiute
*AND*
PAUL NEWMAN in
COOL
HAND LUKE
-THURSDAY-
"AN ABSOLUTELY
STUNNING FILM!
A TOPNOTCH
THRILLER!
-JUDITH GRIST,
NEW YORK MAGAZINE

Ramsey obviously had the visual
interests of the spectators in
mind as he selected outfits with
variety and richness which did
not distract attention from in-
volvement with the total pro-
duction.
Director John Reed deserves
credit for the unity of the act-
ing, sets, lighting and costumes
as well as for his attempt to
bring French language theatre
to Ann Arbor. However, the
praise for this production must
be kept within the context of
an amateur production, with
novice actors.

I

the ann arbor film1 cooperativeJ
PRESENTS 25 FINE FILMS THIS TERM
TONIGHT-TU ESDAY-JANUARY 18th-ONLY:
Lew Ayres, Louis Wolheim, Slim Summerville in Louis Milestone's
ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT
Winner of 2 Academy Awards (Best Picture, Best Director) 1929/30
Made from Erich Maria. Remarque's great anti-war novel, this most uncomprpmising anti-war film ever made was banned in Germany until
the 1960's. One of the first all-sound films made, Milestone never lets the slightest glorification of war creep into his grim World War
I film. It gave. an enormous boost to the career of Ayres, the young actor who was later to become a noted conscientious objector in World
War II, then serve with distinction as a non-combatant hospital corpsman.
auditorium o-angell hall-tonight at 7 & 9:30 p.m.-still only 75c
COMING THURSDAY-Melvyn Douglas, Gene Hackman in I NEVER SANG FOR MY FATHER
NEXT TUESDAY-Beyond horror!-NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD
THURSDAY, JAN. 27-Mich Jagger in the Maysles' GIMME SHELTER

1

mwm

ENDS THURSDAY
"GO SEE $ (DOLLARS)
AND BE HAPPY!"
--Wanda Hale, N.Y. Daily News
WARREN BEATTY
and
GOLDIE HAWN
In

PRESENTS
MR. D.W. GRIFFITH'S
THE BIRTH
OF A NATION
Cinema Guild's annual tribute
to the birth of the narrative
film. To be appreciated, The
Birth of a Nation must be
thought of in its historical con-
text. Behind the overtones of
racism and the 57 years of
wear on the print lie narrative
innovations (parallel cutting,
revealing camera movements,
ond so on) which stunned the
film-going world in 1915. These
innovations gave the cinema
some of its first moments of
breath-taking excitement. Pres-
ident Woodrow Wilson described
the film by saying: "it's like
.writing history in lightning.".
Birth of a Nation stars the great
Lillian Gish (Mae Marsh also
has a role). It will be shown at
7 and 9 p.m. on Tuesday and
Wednesday nights in
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
75c

I

IN STEREO
SOUND!
RATED G

I

OPEN 1 P.M.
Shows at
1:15-3:15-6:15-8:45
NEXT:
"DIRTY HARRY"

L~

<J ' ._
.r
/ _. a.

FRIDAY
"Sometimes A Great
Notion"

a

.-=- w dkiA&o

i

ti

2 PERFORMANCES!-FR. and SAT.

JACK
MACGOWRAN
In the works af Q& IwIl

OBIS
WINNER

FRI.
JAN.
NC 21-22

I

;

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