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March 16, 1972 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Twelve
Wallace, Humphrey em
Florida favorably; MUs

(Continued from Page 1)
the vote in a large field. And it.
is also true that the depth of his
support, more than observers be-
lieved, includes the cities and the
rural areas; the farmers and the
blue collar workers.
Nevertheless, it is inconceivable
that Wallace would get the Demo-
cratic nomination. And it is also
doubtful that he will wield much
influence at the convention.
Even if he had 600 committed
delegates, it is unclear what pow-
er that would give him. He could
demand an anti-busing stand in
the Democratic Party Platform in
exchange for releasing his dele-
gates. That effect would finally
be minimal, however, since; the
party platform is often ignored by
candidates.
The fortunes of candidates who
received lesser totals in the pri-
maries were very much at stake
in the Florida primary as well.
Jackson, a man who has moved
increasingly to the right in the
last month, finished a slightly sur-
prising third, beating out Muskie.

Not at all surprising was the
fact that Jackson claimed, victory.
If the showing is construed as a
win, it will be short-lived. Jackson
had once hoped to grab the Florida
primary but with Wallace's flam-
boyant entry, most of his vote
was siphoned by the Alabama
governor.
In the upcoming Northern pri-!
maries, where voter makeup is far
more liberal than Florida's, Jack-
son will be hard put to make
respectable showings. The fact is
that despite Jackson's third place
finish he may still be one of the
earlier casualties of . the Demo-
cratic sweepstakes.
The other significant race in the
Florida primary was a skirmish'
on the liberal left: New York May-
or John Lindsay and McGovern.
In percentages, there was a vir-
tual standoff. But in image, the
results were a clear blow to Lind-
say.
Like Jackson, Lindsay had count-
ed on a strong Florida showing,
to propel his tenuous campaign
into national prominence. To that

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

cerge from,
kie set back
end, Lindsay devoted all his
charisma, slick organization and
more money than any other can-
didate in a major effort. He did
poorly despite extensive media
efforts and' despite the fact that
he has spent far gnore time in
Miami in the last month than in
the city he governs.
McGovern, on the other hand,
had written off Florida and de-
voted both his money and his time
to a successful effort in New
Hampshire. Nevertheless, despite
a meager Florida effort, he held
his ideological contemporary twin
to a virtual standoff.
Moreover, McGovern's six per
cent showing, in a Deep-South con-
servative state, is more than most
national polls attribute to him. If
McGovern should sweep Wiscon-
sin, where the war issue is still
considered a priority, he may be
a far greater national threat than
many had believed.
The biggest winner of the Florida
primary may just be the man who
didn't even run: Massachusetts
Sen. Edward Kennedy. It is in-
creasingly clear that no candidate
will go into the convention with
anywhere near the requisite 15001
votes for nomination.
Black, living,
units up for
re ental vote
(Continued from Page 1)
with each other before they can
communicate with whites.
In addition to the formal pro-
posals for the living units within
Stockwell and South Quad, the
group of black Stockwell residents
and the minority council have
submitted to the housing office
proposals for the organizational
structure of the unit and several
proposed educational programs.
Housing Director John Feld-
kamp cites substantial numbers
of both blacks and whites who
come to the University from pre-
viously segregated backgrounds as
a cause of racial tensions in the
dorms.
Termpaper Arsenal, Inc.
b end $1.00 for your 'descriptive
catalog of 1,300 quality termpapers
519 Glenrock Ave., Suite 203
Los Angeles, Calif. 90024
(213) 477-8474 477-5493
"we need a local salesman"

THE MICHIGAN DAILY .
Regents to decide
PIRGIM funds issue

I

(Continued from. Page 1)
Since then, PIRGIM has devel-
oped the idea of a negative check-
off, where only students unwilling
to contribute the $3 per year
would fill out forms.i
Tower, supporting PIRGIM'sI
new proposal, said, "We already
have 16,000 signatures supporting
a mandatory refundable fee. Sec-
ondly, we feel we'd be more suc-
cessful with this method of fund-
ing, and, in addition, this method
would be easier to administer."
Another argument for the pro-
posal is the negative check-off
method's success in Minnesota
where, according to Tower, the
program has had an even great-
er response than it did with the
mandatory assessment. Other
states are reportedly converting to
this method also.

PIRGIM has no guarantee that
funding would be more successful
in Michigan with this the nega-
tive check-off, except what mem-
bers call "a gut feeling that we'd
have more money to work with
our way than with other method
proposals."
However, the Regents contacted
this week questioned the Univer-
sity's power to act as a collecting
agent for a unit outside the Uni-
versity.

visual
carnuicaliens
BFA Programs
Certificate Programs
For info contact registrar
Parsons
School of Design
66 West 12 St.,New York 10011

... ....... ....... . .............. .......... .............. ,........;'l:":"ri3.'r.} ::V::::............... ... rt..: ;4: :'r': Iii"ii''J f. J} h 'i':4 ifiiJi

1972 UNDERGRAD

Student organizede
of student wo

I

Thursday, March 16, 1972

SHOW OPEYS FRIDA
7-11 P.11. and Run
SAT. 8 A.M.-l 1 P.M.
This ad compliments of Q

ART SHOW
exhibition
Drks
Y, MARCH 17
s MON. thru
Until April 1
uarry Photo Inc.

Ai

HIKING
BOOTS
" TYROLEANS .
" DUNHAMS *
Gals and Guys

Man Adapting to the Small Planet
SEMINAR SERIES
FRANCES LAPPE, author
DIET FOR A SMALL PLANET
TODAY, THURSDAY, MARCH 16, 7:30 P.M.
UGLI MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
sponsored by ECOLOGY CENTER & COMMUNITY ORGANIC GARDEN

THURSDAY, MARCH 16
Day Calendar
Mathematics Dept.: Linguistics Con-
ference, Anderson Rm., Mich. Union,
9 a.m.
Physics Seminar: J. Stern, Orsay,
France, "Light Cone Property of Cur-
rent Commutators," 2038 Randall Lab.,
11 a.m.
Regents' Meeting: Public Discussion,
Regents' Rmn., first floor, Admin. Bldg.,
1:30 p.m.
Psychiatry Lecture: D. Fambrough,
Inst. for Advanced Studies, Baltimore,
"Acetylcholine Receptors and Develop-
ing Muscle Fibers," 1657 MHRI, 3:45E
p.m.
English Dept. - Extension Service:
Poetry readings by Donald Justice,
UGLI Multipurpose Rm., 4 p.m.
Urban Planning Lecture: P. Davidoff,
director, Suburban Action Inst., White
Plains, N.Y., "Advocacy' Planning for
an Open Society," Rackham Amph.,
4 p.m.
Physics Seminar: G. Dunifer, WSU,
"Short Wave Length Cyclotron Waves
and Electron-Electron Correlations,"
1041 Randall Lab., 4 p.m.
Physics Colloquium: T. M. Sanders,
"Quantum Effects In Low Temperature
Fluids," 2046 Randall Lab., 4 p.m.
International Night: foods from the
British Isles, Mich. League Cafeteria,
5 p.m.t
Computing Center: "Introduction to
GPSS/360," 146, Bus. Ad., 7 p.m.
ENACT: F. Lappe, author, "Diet for
a Small Planet," UGLI Multipurpose
Rm., 7:30 p.m.
University Players: F r i e d m an ' s
"Steambath," Arena Theatre, Frieze
Bldg., 8 p.m.
International Coffee Hour: 1024 Hill
St., 9 p.m.
General Notices
As of April 2 regular public tours of
the Computing Ctr. willbe offered only
at 3 p.m. on Sunday; arrange tours for
other hours by calling Mrs. Grace Pres-
ton, 764-2121.
Gay Liberation open meeting, Thurs.,
March 16, 8:64 p.m., Union, 3-watb,
TV & Stereo Rentals
$"10.00 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

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i:lt ":: "?.".':::.".:.".":511.::.:: .".".".".".".":.. :}::titi J:":;::":'J:';":: t"1:::" :li':.'..i"y .. li:
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SGC Workroom.
Interviews for summer jobs:
CAMP MA-HI-YA, Mich. Social Work
Camp. Will interview Fri., Mar. 17, 10-5;
counselors (for boys) experienced, nurse
and cooks.
CAMP MAPLEHURST, Mich. coed.
Will interview Fri., Mar. 17, 1:30-5:00.
Waterfront, arts and crafts, riding,
water skiing; register by phone
(763-4117) or in person at Summer
Placement Ofc., 212 SAB.
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Grand Rapids Yacht Club, Grand
Rapids, Mich. Instructor needed to
teach beginning and advanced sailing;
further info. available.
Waverly Schools, Lansing, Mich., info.
and appls. available on recreation type
openings, playground instructors; fur-
ther infor., come in or call.
Further info, about following anncts.
available at CPP in the Career Planning
Library, or call 764-6338.
UNITED NATIONS OFFICE AT GE-
NEVA, Grad, study program for 2-3
weeks; study working of UN; appl.
deadline Apr. 10.
LISLE INTERNATIONAL offers pro-
grams to promote the understanding of
worldwide human relations, and the
ways of living in different cultures.
FAMILY SERVICE ASSOC. OF AMER.
has sent a list of grants for study in
grad. schools of social work; includes
many states.
RADCLIFFE COLLEGE offers sum-
mer course for men and women in
Publishing Procedures; practical train-
ing in basic techniques of publishing.
SPECIAL NOTICE: Marines are in-
terviewing at Career Planning & Place-
ment, 3200 Student Activities Build-
ing, today and tomorrow, and not at
the English Dept. as indicated earlier.

FLARES
Your
Choice
reg. to $24

F

W,

I

I

I

I

The Center for Continuing Education of Women
and the Department of History
present

GERDA

LERNER

Professor of History, Sarah Lawrence College

CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

I

Just received' a large
shipment in Blue and
Brown Suede
MAST'S
CAMPUS SHOP

"Black Women in American. History"
8 p.m., TONIGHT
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
"WOMEN IN PERSPECTIVE" LECTURE SERIES

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4

SAVE

FREE

PUBLIC INVITED

*

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DORM

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RESIDENTS

UP
TO
$600
ON
NEW
'11 Toyota's
Full Factory
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19 TO CHOOSE
FROM
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TOYOTA
ANN ARBOR
907 N. MAIN 0@663-8567

-

Help make the decisions that affect your living
situation. Run for representative on the Student
Housing Government which will appoint residence
,hall representatives to the housing policy board.
To become a candidate or get more information
come to 3X Michigan Union or call 763-3241.
Filing deadline is Friday, March 17, 1972 at 5:00
P.M.

'

Jerry

(Gerald)

GET INVOLVED

DeGRIECK

- - _-_ -

#.

Promises, Promises!

-a

"Students have been promised

repre-

For

(ily Council
FIRST WARD
0 Tenant controlled
housing policy board to
enforce rent control and
strict code enforcement.
0 Community control of
public services-low cost
housing, healthcare,
childcare, drug help.
* Community control of
police.
* Repeal all laws against
victimless crimes-drugs,
loitering, curfew, abortion,

sentation on the city council for years.
It is a promise that non-student coun-
come to put the voice of a student and
cilmen have seldom kept. The time has
not the promise of a student voice in
city government. I am a student, know
students and will speak for the stu-
dents on city council. Vote for me on
April 3rd and put a voice, not a prom-
ise, on the city council."

I

4

VOTE

I

-IAPRIL 3

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