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March 15, 1972 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-15

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Idikus Martias Wednesday, March 15, 1972

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Idikus Martias Wednesday, March 15, 1972

Tbhe Florida primary results

Candidate
WALLACE
HUMPHREY
JACKSON
MUSKIE
LINDSAY
McGOVERN
CHISHOLM
McCARTHY
MILLS
HARTKE
YORTY

The Democratic primary
Vote totals
505,689
227,059
164,976
108,132
79,484
74,286
43,384
5,848
4,575
3,477
2,560

Percentage
41%
19%
14%
9%
6%
6%
4%
0%
0%
0%
0%

The Republican primary
Candidate Vote totals Percentage
NIXON 356,847 87%
ASHBROOK 35,896 9%
McCLOSKEY 16,950 4%
TheseK igures reflect vote totals with 99 per cent of the 2,841 Florida precincts reporting.
Wallace beats Humphrey in Fla.

(Continued from Page 1) Florida was Humphrey's first
chance for all to get a quality primary, and he had hoped to
education. outpoll Muskie in the opening
In a non-binding straw vote phase of his campaign to block
taken along with the state's, presi- and pass the senator from Maine.
dential primary, Floridians op- Humphrey said if 'Wallace won,
posed busing by.a 3-1 margin and it would do his campaign no harm
supported the equal education pro- because the Alabama governor is
posal by 4 to 1. not a "card-carrying Democrat."
In a third referendum voters Jackson, like Wallace, campaign-
expressed approval of prayer in ed in Florida as a foe of compul-
public schools by a 4-1 margin. sory school busing. He said it was
The busing issue was expected the overridisg issue. The Wash-
to bring large numbers of Wallace ington senator had hoped for a
supporters to the polls, and it substantial showing.
forced other Democratic candi- "It's important for Scoop Jack-
dates to take stands on the issue. son, it's crucial for Hubert Hum-
Chisholm and Lindsay said flatly phrey and Ed Muskie," Jackson
they favored school busing. Wal- said before returns came in. "If
lace and Jackson opposed it. those two do poorly then I think
Humphrey said he opposed mass Muskie has had it and Humphrey
busing solely for the purpose of is in deep trouble."
achieving racial ratios while Mus- The campaign, was a costly one;
kie said he did not like busing but radio and television advertising
it could be a useful tool for de- bills ran to a total of more than
segregation. $1 million for all the candidates,
McGovern said he favored school with the heaviest investments by
basing, even though he voted for; Jackson, Lindsay and Muskie, and
the recent compromise amendment Humphrey not far behind.
in the Senate. Billboard and newspaper adver-
Wallace said he had established tising cost the candidates about
himself as a national contender $300,000 more.
with his Florida showing. Humhprey said his second-place
Jackson said his third-place fin- ishowing gave his campaign a big
ish was "a tremendous boost for boost and momentum for the April

have to make his own assessmentl
of the Florida vote: "I never said
he was the front-runner."a
More than 500 supporters crowd-
ed Humphrey's Miami headquar-
ters to hear him claim "a good
start" in defeat.
Muskie appeared before about
300 supporters at his hotel head-
quarters to concede his, defeat and
describe the Wallace victory as '°a
threat to the unity of this coun-
try."
He said the personal defeat dis-
turbed him less than the fact that
Wallace was the victor. He called
Wallace "a demagogue of the
worst possible kind."
As for his presidential cam-
paign, Muskie said: "We'll take
the future as it comes, and the
future is going to be bright."
Commenting on the Democrats
he had left far behind, Wallace
said, "I think all of them had been
badly hurt."
Asked if he envisioned linking
forces with any of them, he re-
plied, "Maybe they want to get
together with me now."
Hehsaid his goal was "to be the
nominee of the Democratic paty."
On the busing issue, the Ala-
bama Democrat would not say
whether he thought it propelled
his candidacy.
"It pleases the exotic and thce e
that make the most noise," he
said.
"I believe I have as good a
chance as anyone to win the party.
nomination. I have as good a
chance or better than anyone go-
ing out of Florida," the Alabama
governor said.

STRESS hit
with suit,
investigation
Vincent was talking to Jones on
the telephone when the first shots
were fired.
"Aaron just dropped the phone.
The receiver was off the hook. I
could hear everything," said Jones,
who told her mother to pick up an
extension phone.
"You could hear a constant
array of shots," said Jones. "Then
we heard the deputies hollering. I
heard one yell 'Davis' and say he
was a Wayne County deputy."
The two women drove quickly
to the scene, and said when they
informed police of their knowledge
of 'the shooting they were locked
inside a patrol car and told they
would be taken to headquarters
as witnesses.I
Minutes later, according to the
women, they were moved to an-
other car where, they said, the
policemen beat the older Jones.
A report on the Thursday shoot-
ing is being prepared by a joint
committee of the sheriff's office
and the police department and is
expected to go to the prosecutor
near the end of the week. War-
rants if any, may not be issued
until next week.
OFF WITH HIS HEAD
Nobody has been publically guil-
lotined in France since 1939.
AAND NOW
A WORD,
FROM OUR
I Um
C R E A T O R:11 X~ n )71 -
advertising contributed v
for the pubic good [ I 7 rRELJDIO
r MGr~

'(Continued from Page 1)
May or the first week in June.
The delegates will caucus by presi-
dential preference and choose
delegates to the state : conven-
tions.
T h o s e delegates fortunate
enough to be chosen to attend the
state convention will once again
caucus by presidential preference
and choose delegates for the na-
tional conventions. Michigan will
have 48 delegates at the Repub-
lican convention in San Diego,
and 132 Democratic delegates at
the Miami Beach convention.
In spite of the hassle necessary
to be chosen as a delegate to the
national convention, George Sal-
lade, the second congressional dis-
trict Chiarman of the Democratic
party, feels that young voters
have a "good" chance to attend
the county convention.
In addition, the Democratic
party has new guidelines recom-
mending "that state Democratic
parties overcome the effects of
past discrimination by affirma-
tive steps to encourage the par-
ticipation of minority groups,
women, and young people."
MEET THE ORDER THAT
IS 113 YEARS YOUNG.
Paulists are often called the
"modern" order but it isn't just
because we are only a little over
a century old. It's because of
what we stand for.
The Paulists were founded by
Isaac Hecker, one of the earliest
ecumenical spokesmen. Father
Hecker, who was a convert to
Catholicism and a century ahead
of his time, conceived and di-
rected the first missionary soci-
ety of priests established in, and
for, North America.
Father Hecker's vision was a
community that would "meet the'
needs of the Church in each age
as they arise." For this reason 1
he wanted the Paulists to be flex-
ible, not wedded to specific
works. A special project might,
be suitable for a particular time
and a given need, but changing
times would require different
techniques and approaches that
might differ from age to age.
That's why the Paulists are so
flexible. Whether a man is in a
parish, University Apostolate or
mission...whether he is involved
in a narcotic panel or the Paulist
press, radio, films or television,
he has the freedom to use his
own talents in his own way to
achieve his objectives.
Paulists are not custodians of
the past, but explorers of the
future.'
Now you know why we are
called "modern."
For more information about
the Paulist ,priesthood write to:
Rev. Donald C. Campbell,
C.S.P., Vocation Director,
Room No. 100.

How to run for precinct
delegate in state primary

I

Although the Republicans have
no such similar set of guidelines,
law student Mike Renner, a mem-
ber of the Youth Advisory Coun-
cil to the Republican Party, says
"the main project of the Council
presently is to finl eligible young
people in local districts to run for
precinct delegate. We're trying to
get as many as possible."
Renner feels that "quite a few"
young people will attend the Re-
publican County Convention, but
is less optimistic about the like-
lihood of many youths being sent
to the national convention.
A spokesperson for the local
Human Rights Party said "It's in-
conceivable that we'd get involved
with electing delegates to the
Democratic or Republican con-
ventions. We're a separate third
party.'
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He said the Wallace victory was,
disturbing.
"The extent of it surprised me,"
Jackson said. "It means the coun-
try is concerned and the Demo-
cratic party had better look for
new faces."

4 primary in Wisconsin, "and all
the rest of them coming up."
". . Among the progressive
Democrats, I am the leader," the
formek vice president said. "I'
hope to be able to demonstrate
that in other primaries."
Humphrey said Muskie would

Mitchell denies charges
of link: to- ITT settlement

V.

(Continued from Pega 1)
ious consequences" of the Justice
Department anti-trust action.
Critics of the ITT merger set-
tlement in the wake of Ander-
son's accusation have charged that
ITT pressured top government of-
ficials into persuading former Jus-
tice Dept. anti-trust division chief
RichardcMcLaren to settle -t o
terms acceptable to ITT - the
suits he had pressed for more than
two years.
Staff aides-to several Democratic
judiciary committee members have
said that they are interested in
the possible roles played by such
officials as University business
Prof. Paul McCracken - former
chairman of the Council on Eco-
nomic Advisors-in- the settlement
of the ITT case.
Some were reluctant yesterday
to predict the likelihood of the
committee calling McCracken and
other government officials who
met with Geneen. As one aide put
it, "There's a chance. But we'l.
just have to see."
McCracken said in an interview
Monday he met, "once, perhaps
twice" with Geneen while, the anti-
trust cases against ITT were pend-
ing. He said that the discussions
were "nothing out of the ordi-
nary."
According to McCracken, he also
discussed the ITT case on an "in-
formal basis" with McLaren.
Asked about these conversations,
McCracken said that he merely
discussed with McLaren the pos-
sible "economic viability" of the
merger.
During yesterday's hearing, the
judiciary committee questioned
Mitchell about meetings in his of-
fice last spring with California Re-
publican Lt. Gov. Ed Reinecke.
Two weeks ago Reinecke said
that he met with Mitchell in mid-
May and told him about financial
arrangements and in particular,I
attempts to locate the Nationalr
Republican Convention in San
Diego.
At a news conference three
weeks ago, Mitchell said "I don't
know the faintest thing about con-
vention financing."
He added that he had had noth-
ing todo with convention ar-
rangements.
Mitchell said that according to
his records he met with Reinecke
in his office both last April 26 and
Sept. 17.
'-p

An assistant to Reinecke yes-
terday told The Daily that the
September meeting was 'a brief-
ing session on the convention, in
which the $400,000 convention
pledge was also discussed." Mit-
chell, however, said yesterday only
that the meetings were generally
concerned with California eco-
nomic developments.
In related action, Sen. Thomas
Eagleton (D-Mo.) told the Senate
yesterday that White House aide
Peter Flanigan should testify be-
fore the judiciary committee be-a s f hs ol s m se m n
cause of hisrl as mastermid
of administration "cave-ins"-such
as the ITT settlement-to large
corporations.
Hedescribed the former invest-
ment firm vice president as "a
man who works in the shad9ws-
but only at the highest levels,
only with the fattest cats."
Meanwhile, Beard, an important
protagonist in the ITT controversy,
was in Denver last July, a per-
sonal friend says, when the Repub-
lican National Convention Commit-
tee met to choose San Diego as its
site for the 1972 convention, the
Rocky Mountain News reported
yesterday in Denver.

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