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January 16, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-16

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Sunday, January 16,, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nint.

Sunday, January 16, 1972 IKE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Ninb

Precision Bucks rip,

Frosh cagers overcome torrid
Titans' first half onslaught

lackluster

Wolverines

Special To The Daily the first 7:29 of the second half sharp," that he "didn't expect us
By ELLIOT LEGOW while Ohio State dumped in 22 to miss so many shots," and that
COLUMBUS - Michigan's points to pull to their 30 point "we played like we were scared,"
Wolverine cagers were over- lead. During that time Michigan's but all of the blame doesn't lie
,offense consisted of forced outside on his players.
mtched, outplayedandpar-jumpers and numerous turnovers Wilmore managed to hit just
ticularly outcoached as they while the Buckeyes used running under half of his shots although
dropped an 84-73 decision yes- successful passes and picks on of- often forced to fire under unfav-
terday to Ohio State's Buck- fense to free guards Hornyak and orable conditions. Lockard almost
eyes for their first loss this Dan Gerhard and forward Mark matched Witte's game high re-
season in Big Ten playMinor and completely dominated bound total of 14 with 13 of his
the backboards. own and totaled 15 points, mostly
Ohio State employed an aggres- Michigan's coach Johnny Orr on a good inside shot.
sive man-to-man defense and a couldn't explain the poor perform- Guard Greg Buss also performed
stopheolerines'r BigTene win ance of his squad stating, "we just well when inserted in the back-
stop the Wolverines' Big Ten win don't move, I don't understand it." court late in the game. Although
string at two games. The Buck- Ohio State on the other hand was he tallied but two points, Buss
es broke the game open midw constantly moving on offense and finally got the Michigan offense
through the first half and pulled hitting the open man as it always moving in the ball-handling style
into ahhuge66-36 lead halfway has under Coach Fred Taylor's 14 of Dan Fife.
into the final period and then year regime in Columbus. Ken Brady made his premier
coasted home with their 10th win In the favorite position for his performance of the season, and
against only two defeats. eighth Big Ten championship Tay- although obviously not in top
Michigan's attack sputtered as or praised his team for being "a shape battled Witte on the boards
tempt to work the ball nte top lot more active offensively than for ten minutes and landed a
to top we have been" and said of the "rather solidly-placed shot" to the
scorer H decided, and fuilthe Buckeye's five turnovers as com- Buckeyes' seven-footer during a
comeupwithanyotherfeffectivepared to Michigan's 15, "that must rebound scuffle, and received a
shoer.p wThn Woere efinishe be an indoor record." technical foul as a result.
httin only.3Tefomher fied But besides the better perform- But Orr was unable to lead his
hitting only 38nersrom the fieAl ances of his players Taylor has Wolverines and as they flound-
All-ig Tnner WiloreAlanhimself to .thank for the difference ered, the Buckeyes hit 49% of
Hornyak, and Luke Witte all in the ball game. His active of- their shots. Hornyak led the Buck
scored at least 20 points, but Wil- fense and tight defense contrast offense with 25 points, although
more hit half of his game high 26 favorably with Orr's sloppy at- Taylor admitted he's still not in
points after the Buckeyes' had tack and non-defense. top shape, Witte had 20, Gerhard
Hornyak, meanwhile, pumped in Orr said that Michigan "wasn't 12, and Minor 10.
15 points in the first half and r:.r":.... ........~r"; ..r.. ".:........:...;..
Witte added 13 and pulled down Bi Te St n ng
the key rebounds as the Buckeyes BiKe tn in sAlGm
grabbed a halftime 42-28 advan-Big Te
Big Ten All Games
tage. was only In the gameW L Percentage W L
for the first six minutes as it Ohio State 2 0 1.000 10 2
trailed 17-15 but then fell apart Minnesota 2 0 1.000 8 3
offensively and defensively. John Wisconsin 2 1 .667 9 4
Lockard had dropped in three early MICHIGAN 2 1 .667 7 6
buckets for Michigan and Ernie Michigan State 1 1 .500 7 4
Johnson hit one other. Purdue 1 1 .500 7 5
But when their inside shots Iowa 1 1 .500 6 5
started missing and guards Wayne Illinois 1 2 .333 9 3;
Grabiec and Dave Hart were un- Indira 4 2.000 8 4
able to hit from outside and un- ndlien r 0 2
willing to work the ball inside to Northwestern 0 3 .000 2 9
Wilmore, the Wolverine attack Yesterday's results
died. Ohio State 84, Michigan 73I
Ohio State then reeled off 12 Minnesota 84, Northwestern 60
straight points to move to a 29-15 Purdue 85, Illinois 74
lead and they kept the same lead Wisconsin 66. Indiana 64, OT
until the start of the s e c o n d -- _________
stanza. F U T OULD T O
Michigan hit only one basket in FOURTH ROUND TKO:
Bucked again
MICIGAFrazier outclasses,
Wilmore9-19 81 r tot

By RANDY PHILLIPS
Everything was going in for De-
troit in the first half as the Titans
built up a 12 point lead, but Cam-
py Russell led a second half 54
point scoring assault to lead the
Wolverine Frosh to a 94-80 victoryE
yesterday at Crisler Arena.
Russell poured in 38 points, add-
ing nine rebounds, and an aggres-
sive Wolverine defense held the
hot shooting Titans to 31 points
in the second period.
A team couldn't shoot much bet-
ter than Detroit did in the first
20 minutes of play as the Titans
scorched the hoop for 22 of 30
shots from the floor for a 49-40
half - time lead. C e n t e r Terry
Thomas and forward Jerry Guin-
ane were doing most of the damage
as they collected 16 points each.,
Nearly all of the Titan shots
were from about 10-15 feet out
and many were wide open shots
as the T i t a n s moved the ball'
around smoothly and hit the open
man.
Michigan tried the zone press'
periodically in the first half and
even went into a zone for a while
to try and slow down Detroit's
momentum. But n e i t h e r tactic
worked until the last minute of
the half when the 'press forced
Detroit into two straight turnovers
and the Titan's nine point lead
was diminished to five. But the Ti-

s
E
Iff
1
{4
I

i
SUNDAY SPORTS
Night Editors : The Miami boys, -Mike and Randy-Go Dolphins!

-Daily-Mort Noveck
MICHIGAN'S HENRY WILMORE (25).gets inside the Buckeye's
center Luke Witte (34) for an easy lay-up. Wilmore scored 26
points against OSU but it wasn't enough as he received little
help from his teammates in Michigan's 84-73 loss.
MARRED BY PENAL T

-2

IES

tans scored two quick buckets and
the Wolverines' Joe Johnson's
driving lay-up at the buzzer went
in and out of the hoop to preserve
Detroit's nine point margin at
half.
Fired up, Micchigan came out
in the second half and blitzed De-
troit with an aggressive defense
and a much improved zone press.
The press forced the Titans into
three straight turnovers near the
start of the half. Michigan con-
verted two of them into scores and
ran off an 11-3 margin in the first
four minutes of the half to pull
within one at 52-51. Russell had 5
of the 11 and also blocked a shot
by Thomas in the surge.
Micchigan Coach Dick Honig
called the press the "key to all of
our games." He added:
"We use it whenever we're slow:
in getting going. We're not a
quick starting team."
According to Honig, the press
did not work when first used.
"In the first half it (press)
didn't bother them; we weren't ag-
gressive enough."
Campy Russell played Thomas
tough throughout the second half,
and shut the 6-7 center out after
his torrid shooting performance in
the first half. With 'just under 15
minutes left to play Russell forced
Thomas into his fourth personal
foul.
After Thomas' fourth foul, the
usually low scoring forward John
Ashworth got into the scoring act.
Ashworth put in two shots and put
Michigan ahead for the first time
since. the first minute of play,
55=54.
Detroit gained the lead briefly,
but Russell knotted the score at
57-all and then Michigan blew the
game wide open. Michigan reeled
off ten straight points to lead 67-
57 with 9:35 left and then moved
out to their biggest lead of the
day, 74-60.

When asked about Russell's de-
fensive masterpiece on Thomas,
Honig replied:
"Campy wanted to -accept the
challenge and he s t o p p e d him
(Thomas)."
Russell said It was Johnson who
gave him the idea to cover Thom-
as, but it was the fine outside
shooting day that Campy was
thinking about. Russell shot 15 of
28 from the field.
"This is the first time I've had
a good shooting day in a long
time."

lcers drop
By JOEL GREER standing
Special To The Daily Ed Hay;
DENVER-"We're not quite that the deci
good, and Michigan's not really' ines we
that bad," declared Denver coach occasion
Murray Armstrong after Friday's Randy
10-1 Pioneer victory. The Michigan vermines
icers almost proved Armstrong's minutel
statement to be true last night as kept the
they battled the Pioneers even the equ
until costly penalties in the third fourth sI
period cost them the game. ped the

fourth in row

Johnson:
Russell
Ashworth
Kantne.
Kupec
Ayler;
Stroud
Wolff
TOTAL
Thomas
Guinane
Riley
Savage
McHugh.
Hill
Nustad
Kaseta
TOTAL

a
LS

Russell romps,
MICHIGAN
2-11 3-4 2
15-25 8-12 9
;h6-8 0-1 10
3-6 2-2 3
6-12 3-7 5
4-4' 0-1 2
1-3 0-0 1
2-2 0-0 1
LS 39-71 '16.27 30

U-DETROreb
$-13 0-1 7
10-15. 0-2 7'
2'-6 6-8 4
6410 6-$
4-14 4-4 3
1-4 0-1 3
0-1 0-0 1
1-2 0-0 1
32-65 16-24 4f

tv
16
20
so
12
2
0
x

room only crowd of 5,237.
s and Tom Puluso scored
ding goals as the Wolver-
re short handed on both
s.
Neal brought the Wol-
within one just past the 18
mark, but another penalty
Wolverines from getting
ualizer. The defeat, the
traight for Michigan, drop-
icers deeper into ninth
f the Western Collegiate

9:00 mark and it was feared the
frisky senior was lost for the night.
He apparently received a slight
gash near his right eye. But he
returned after a quick visit to the
clinic. The game was suspended
until his return. Bagnell was no
less than superb, and he kept the
Wolverines in the contest with
several key saves,
However, Denver got the lead
back on another two on one break
away. This time Detroiter Rob
Palmer set up Jim Puluso's back
hand shot after Michigan lost the
puck in the Pioneer zone. Bagnell
made twenty saves in this period
while Pioneer goalie Ron Grahame
stopped only eight.

1 Two Denver power play goals

place of

with less than ten minutes re- Hockey Association.
maining were enough to give the Denver's ability to move quickly
Pioneers a 4-3 victory before a out of its own zone brought about
the first goal at the :56 mark of

Daniels

Johnson
Lockard
Grabiec
Hart
Brady, K.
Tyler
Buss
Bazelon
Bridges
Whitten
Team
TOTALS

2-7
5-10
1-6
1-8
0-2
1-3
1-4
2-2
2-2
0-0

3-5
5-5
0-0
1-4
4-5
4-4
0-0
0-0
0-1
0-0

3
3
2
1
2
2
0
1
0
0
16

6
13
2
3
3
4
2
4
0
0
9
54

7
15
21
3!
41
4
4
73

24-63 25-33

OHIO STATE
fg fga ft fta pf
Minor 5-9 0-2 4
Jackson 3-6 2-2 4
Witte 8-11 4-74 4
Gerhard 6-12 0-0 2
Hornyak 9-22 7-7 1
Wolfe 3-4 0-0 1
Siekmann 0-3 1-2 2
Merchant 0-0 0-0 1
Repella 0-1 2-2 1
Kiracofe 0-1 0-0 1
Wagar 0-1 0-1 0
Allison 0-0 0-0 0
Team
Totals 34-70 16-23 21
SCORE BY PERIODS
MICHIGAN 28
Ohio State 42

r tot
2 10
6 8
14 20
2 12
4 25
2 6
1 1
1 0
0 2
00
0 0
0 0
4
36 84
45-73
42--84

i
t

NEW ORLEANS W) - Joe Frazier knocked
down Terry Daniels five times last night and
retained his world heavyweight championship
when the fight was stopped in the fourth round
with Daniels dropped over the lower strand
of the ropes.
Referee Herman Dutrieux stopped the fight
at 1:47 of the fourth round.
Frazier, fighting for the first time since he
outpointed Muhammad All last March 8, sim-
ply had too much power for Daniels, loser of
three of his 10 fights last year.'
The champion dropped Daniels for the fourth
time at about the minute mark of the fourth
round with a left hook high on the head, fol-
lowed by a short right. Daniels got up at a nine
count and Frazier moved in and drove him
about the ring.
A barrage of punches dropped Daniels again
and he almost fell through the ropes. The referee
then stopped the fight.
There never really was any doubt to the out-
come as the unbeaten Frazier, who weighed
the heaviest of his career at 215z to 191% for

Daniels, put on tremendous pressure right from
the opening bell.
Frazier dropped Daniels with a left hook in
the first round and the count continued after
the bell. The Dallas fighter, who needs six
hours of credit for his college degree, got up at
eight. The referee, not hearing the bell, waved
the fighters into action but ringsiders called his
attention to the fact the round was over.
Daniels stayed on his feet through the second
round and drew cheers from a crowd of. about
9,000 at Rivergate Auditorium. The fightalso
was the first heavyweight title bout on home
television since Ali knocked out Zora Folley
March 22, 1967.
Frazier really put on the pressure as the third
round opened but Daniels fought back at the
two slugged away in Daniels' corner. Daniels
seemed to be tiring as Frazier kept close to
him.
The 28-year-old Frazier put Daniels on the
deck twice more in the third round, the first
time with a right . following a hook and the
second time with a hook. Daniels got up at nine
both times.

the first period. Mike Buxniuk in-
tercepted a Michigan pass at the
Pioneer blue line and sent Ed
Hays and Tom Puluso into the
Michigan zone two on one. Using~
Puluso as a decoy, Hays found the
upper left hand corner to beat
Michigan goalie Karl Bagnell.
The game turned into a rough
and tumble affair as both teams
were intent to take pot shots at
each other. Bob Falconer took one
of the worst chucks of the year as
Tom Puluso caught the Forrest,
Ontaria sophomore with a cross
check under the chin. Falconer
was helped from the ice but came
back to cause a little trouble of his
own.
On his next shift, Falconer
dumped Vic Venasky with a clean
check, but the All American re-
taliated with a vicious elbow. This
time the officials saw the incident
and Venasky went to the penalty
box.
It didn't take long for the Wol-
verines to capitalize on the power
play, as they displayed their in-
itial offense of the series.
Punch Cartier fired from the
point and Paul Andre Paris was
Ihere to send in the rebound.
Michigan goalie Karl Bagnell
took a shot on the mask at the
peanuts,
t around:
nI
Luxembourg,
d.

ED SANDERS
DONALD HALL
GLENN
and many otherA
Sunday, Jan. 1

JOHN SINCLAIR
JERRY YOUNKINS
DAVIS
Ann Arbor poets
16-Hill Aud.
Doors open at 7:3.0

day, 74-60.

Sponsored by Writers in Residence and Artists Workshop

I

FFor teStudent Body:
SALE'
" Jeans
" Bells.
" FlIares
'/2 off
CHECKMATE]
State Street at Liberty

POET JAM
Benefit for Washington St. Community Center
With:

S

SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Marquette 68, Detroit 66
Miami, Ohio 80, Bowling Green 69
Navy 55, Air Force 53
Florida 72, Kentucky 70
NHL
Toronto 4, New York 3
Detroit 7, Los Angeles 4!
Boston 4, Chicago 2
Montreal 6, Buffalo 2
Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 2
'Ii
V

Now that you can fly to Europe for
here's how little you shell out to ge
$130 for Two Months of unlimited rail travel i
Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Holland, Italy,
Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerlan

0

You shell out $130, and get a Student-Railpass.
All you need is the bread and something to show you're
a bona fide student between 14 and 25.
Our Student-Railpass gives you all that unlimited
rail travel on the 100,000 mile railroad networks of those
13 countries. For two foot-loose months. So with low air
fares and Student-Railpass you've got Europe made.
Our Student-Railpass gets you Second Class
travel on our trains. You'll find that there's very little
second class about Second Class. Besides being com-
fortable, clean, fast, and absurdly punctual, the Euro-

pean trains have some other advantages for you. They
take you from city center to city center, so you don't have
to hassle airports. And the stations are helpful homes
away from home, with Pictograms that give you informa-
tion in the universal language of signs, and dining rooms,
bookstores and other helpful facilities.
Now, here's the catch. You can't get your
Student-Railpass or the regular First Class Eurailpass in
Europe-you have to get them before you leave the coun-
try. So see your Travel Agent soon. Meanwhile, send in
the coupon for a free folder, complete with railroad map.

STUDENTTRAILPASSThe way to see Europe without feeling like a tourist.
Eurailpass is valid in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal,
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.
Eurailpass, Box 90, Lindenhurst, New York 11757.
Please send me your free Eurailpass folder with railroad map. Q Or your Student-Railpass folder order form. Q

Name

fita

i {41 t I

IV a

au C=l

.JLI'

192

City Sta7ip

-Compliments of a friend

novelty, trQdltior'of 0

m

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