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March 14, 1972 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-03-14

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Page Six.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 14, 1972

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I [

POT LEGAL?
State high court drug ruling
creates furor among students

Local lawyer to run for
State Legislature seat

(Continued from Page 1)
A city ordinance, passed last
year, makes possession of mari-
juana a misdemeanor punishable
by 90 days in jail and $100 in fines
for the first offense and 90 days
and $500 for repeaters or those
in possession of "commercial quan-
tities" (over two ounces) of the
drug.
The local law was passed as a
substitute to the harsher penalties
provided for by the old state law.
City Attorney Jerold Lax has
said the city ordinance is unaf-
fected by the court's ruling.
Though local law enforcement

personnel indicate that arrests for meaning of. the court's decision,

marijuana will continue, it is un-
clear which laws now apply and,
how marijuana cases will be han-I
dled.
Officials generally agree that an
opinion from Attorney General
Frank Kelley expected later this
week will go a long way toward
solving the thorny legal questions
raised by the high court's deci,
sion.
Chief Krasny said yesterday both
federal and city law could be used
in making marijuana arrests.
Krasny said uncertainty over the

however, will cause the police de-
partment to exercise caution in
the prosecution of marijuana cases.
"We probably wouldn't put any-
body in jail unless they have a
whole truck load," he said.
According to County Prosecutor
William Delhey marijuana cases
are currently being "taken under
advisement" until clarification of
the ruling is made.t
This means action against mari-
juana suspects is being delayed
until the prosecutor's office can.
determine which law, if any, they
could prosecute under.'
Conceivably, action could be de-
layed until the new state law takes
effect in April.
Despite the uncertainty, the
county sheriff's department still
plans to make marijuana arrests
under state code, according to Lt.
Charles Broderick.
According to Supreme Court Jus-
tice John Swainson, the only state
law now in effect which could ap-
ply to marijuana is one covering
the use of hallucinogens.
Whether marijuana is a halluci-
nogen under the terms of the law,

Perry Bullard, a local attorney
with a history of activism in Uni-
versity and city affairs, yesterday
announced his candidacy for State
Representative in the August Dem-
ocratic primary.
Bullard, a graduate of the law
school, has previously served as
a precinct delegate from the city's
second ward, and in 1968 led the
McCarthy campaign in several
states.
Bullard takes a generally lib-
eral line on the issues confronting
city residents. He advocates're-
peal of all laws aimed at victim-
less crimes, and in particular
would like to see an end to prose-
cution of marijuana cases.
He is presently urging state At-
torney General Frank Kelley to
refrain from making any mari-
juana arrests in the interim period
before the new drug law goes into
effect on April 1.
"I am convinced," Bullard says,
"that this could serve as a test
period where marijuana use will
be proven harmless once and for
all."
On other questions, Bullard fa-
vors a repeal of abortion laws and
would like to see the creation of
state supported day care centers.

He further supports a "more equit-
able" tax structure than the one
that currently exists, and states
his intention to push for a gradu-
ated city income tax and elimina-
tion of loopholes for the wealthy.
With regard to the University,
Bulfard hopes in the long run to
work for the abolition of all tui-
tion charges. For the present,
however, he favors a deferred tui-
tion plan such as the one used at
Yale University.
Bullard is hoping to get student
support for his campaign, but says
he fears the August primary date
will cut down on the number of
student voters in the Ann Arbor
area.
FREQUENT COMET
The most frequent appearances
of any of the discovered comets
are those of Encke's Comet-dis-
covered in 1786. Increasingly faint,
it is expected to "die" by 1993.
On the other hand, Comet 1910a,
whose path could not be accurately
determined, is not expected to
show up again for perhaps 4 mil-
lion years.

5T
MAY 6--13
plus $1 3 tax, tips, and services
ROUND TRIP JET BY NORTH CENTRAL AIRLINES DIRECT FROM MET-
ROPOLITAN AIRPORT-8 DAYS & 7 NIGHTS DELUXE ACCOMMODA-
TIONS AT THE FAMOUS MONTEGU BEACH HOTEL (nationally adver-
tised in the New Yorker Magazine) coach transfer between Airport and
hotel
OPTIONS: sailing, scuba diving, golf, deep sea fishing, island tours, boat
cruises, horseback riding, motor cycle and car rental
"open only to faculty, students & immediate families of this university, alumni eligible
for certain flights.
For further information please contact: Administrative and travel services by:
UAC TRAVEL OFFICE STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL
Second Floor, Student Union 621 Church Street
763,2147 Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
769-5790
See Classified Ad for Complete Flight List

'M 1

Sinclair case dismissed in
State Supreme Court rulin
(Continued from Page 1) vate residence and charged him,
clauses in the state and federal with the possession of two marl-

constitutions.
Justices Thomas Brennan and
Paul Adams termed Sinclair's sen-
tence as "cruel and unusual pun-
ishment." They dissented from the
majority decision, however, and

juana cigarettes.
In a separate decision the court
ruled that the present law which
requires a 20-year sentence for the
sale of marijuanarwassunconstitu-
tional, on the grounds of cruel

R

held that Sinclair should be re- and unusual punishment. however, remains unclear.
turned to Detroit Recorder's Court, According to State Rep. Robert
where he was tried originally, for FLAMING SWEDE Traxer (D-Bay City), an author
resentencing- of the state's liberalized marijuanaW
Justice Swainson also ruled that The world's most proficient fire- law, prosecutors would find it dif-
Sinclair was the victim of en.. eater is kjell Swing ,of Sweden, ficult and complicated to prove inW HW OL
trapment when the Detorit police who can produce a flame 6' in court that marijuana is a halluci-
arrested him in Detroit at a pri- length. nogen. we, the 1800 foreign students at the Unieisity of Miciga, wat to increase the university's rele
a legitimate student interest group and to current world problems. We also hope to bring to you, t
and the campus community at large, the highlights and important issues of our respective cultures.
WORLD WEEK 1972 is important because it has been totally planned and organi:
! hhffw eign Student Board. We take the theme, "The World Is What We Make It," seriousl
token, we feel that the university is what we make it. We want to contribute to mak
not listed in time schedule sity a world institution. WHAT DO YOU WANT?
The Foreign Student Board, U of M.
ANLOSome activities planned for WORLD WEEK (MARCH 13-19)
Africa and The Third World United Nations For
East European Forum International Women's
N 20 PMpuassiIn addition to these activities we have also planned the
no prerequisites _WORLD'S FAIR
angell elementary school
(Ott South U. betwn. Washtenaw and Oxford)
CHINESE 220-4, credit s tFRI. 7p.m.-12 SAT. 12-12 SUN. 1
INTERNATIONAL COFFEE HOUSE 0 Variety Show " Exhibits 0
Introduction to World Religions: Far Eastern
COME TO THE FAIR

vance to our needs as
he American students
zed by the For-
y. By the same
ing the univer-
um
Forum
2.6 p.m.
Food

f

Ill

rl

vJ~

MARCH

17-

UAC-Daystar Presents:
ALICE COLTRANE & LEON THOMAS & CJQ
Hill Auditorium-8 P.M.-$2, $3.50, $4, $4.50
Tickets - Michigan Union

MARCH 17
"It Ain't Necessarily Soul:"
Gershwin's PORGY & BESS as a symbol.
Lecture by Dr. Richard Crawford
Co-sponsored by School of Music in School's Recital Hall.

lid

8 p.m. - FREE

MARCH 21

& 22-

MARCH 24 & 25-

Experimental films by BEATLE JOHN LENNON
and his wife, YOKO ONO
7:00& 9:00 P.M.-Nat. Sci. Aud.-$1.50

University Dancers Present:
"DANCE CONCERT WEEKEND i"
Power Center for the Performing Arts
3/24-8:00 p.m.-$2.00
3/25-8:00 p.m.-$2.00
3/25-2:30 p.m.-$1.00 (children's matinee)
Tickets at Stanger's and Power Center

J
l

CREATIVE

ARTS

FESTIVAL

1972

MARCH 25 & 26-

MARCH 30 & 31-

SPRI NGFEST-
an exciting new weekend of music, art, poetry,
and dancing.
Union Ballroom and Student Gallery

GENESIS

IV: 7-9 p.m.

Natural Science Auditorium-$1 .50
Two hours of award-winning short films

J*

'' fi e '

l

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