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January 16, 1972 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunc'ay, January 16,

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

For the Student Body:
LEVI'S
Denim
Bells
X8.00
CHE MAT E
State Street at Liberty

CONCERT FLOPS
Airplane drops a bomb on Crisler

Whites leave Letter to

(Continued from Page 2)
from the start that the Jef-
ferson Airplane's mere presence
constituted an event and that
playing music was sort of an
incidental, a tiring ritual that
had to be undergone. Displaying
the style of humor that h a s
made "Stump the Stars" the
success it is today, Gracie Slick
presided over the affair with an
unshakable sense of her own
cool. Her every affected gesture
and joke seemed to say "Yes,
we're the Jefferson Airplane.
Don't you love us?" The aud-
ience seemed inclined to agree,
cheering wildly after every num-
ber and jumping to their feet to
boogie during the encore.
All this could have been for-
given, of course, had the band
actually played well. The truth
is, that they performed a thor-
oughly mediocre set. Joey Cov-
ington, the replacement for de-
parted drummer Spencer Dry-
den, was totaly inadequate. His

simple, boring rhythms make
even Ringo sound like an ac-
complished jazz virtuoso. Gracie
was little better, indulging at
every opportunity her desire to
impress the audience with her
magnificent, operatic voice and
her ability to improvise vocally.
Papa John, the aging b 1 a c k
violinist that the Airplane pick-
ed up a while ago, was the one
who r e a II y stole the show,
though. Every time the group
stepped out instrumentally, it
was Papa John who led the way.
And Papa John, to be honest, is
a dull fiddle player. His main
trick, of course, is being an old
fiddle player who plays w i t h
the Jefferson Airplane. H i s
second trick is smiling and say-
ing "Far out!" or 'You're beau-
tiful people! at appropriate mo-
ments. His last trick is playing
extremely fast runs that span
several octaves in the space of
a few seconds. While his style
is undeniably fast and freaky,

its also unimaginative; Papa
John can't come close to such
ace violinists as Richard Greene
of Seatrain and the f-ree-lancer
Don Harris.
The. rest of this group can be
faulted mainly for letting all
this be done to them. Jack Cas-
ady, the best rock bassist
around, was generally drowned
out by the rest of the band;
Jorma Kaukonen, the group's
able lead guitarist, seemed con-
tent to let Papa John steal the
instrumental spotlight.
In case you're wondering what#
songs the group chose to crucify,
the list goes something like this:
the old single "Somebody to
Love;" "Volunteers" and "Good
Shepherd" from Volunteers;
"When The Earth Moves Again,"
"Feel So Good," "Pretty as You
Feel," "Law Man," "Rock and
Roll Island" and "Third Week
in the Chelsea" from Bark;
"Have You Seen the Stars To-
night" from The Kantner Cum-
quat Cantata; and a few Papa
John numbers.
All in all, a concert well worth
missing.
rU

many cities
(Continued from Page 1i
and Norfolk and Richmond, Va.
The predominantly black Rich-
mond schools were ordered by a
federal judge to merge with white
schools in two neighboring coun-
ties.
Houston's total enrollment drop
of 16,000 included only 700 blacks;
Norfolk lost 4500 whites and no
blacks; and Richmond's white en-
rollment went down 300 while the
number of blacks increased.

The Daily
Daily erred
To The Daily:
IN YOUR front page article en-
titled "PESC to continue pro-
grams despite Smith's statement"
(Daily, Jan. 15), you significantly
distorted my 'remarks concerning
Vice President Allan Smith at Fri-
day's meeting of PESC (Program
for Educational and S o c i a l
Change). I have already apologized

V4

"A tremendous drop of enroll- to Mr. Smith on my own behalf
ment could only be explained by for the effects of this distorted re-
a white flight to suburbia or pri- por't.
vate school systems," a spokes- -Richard D. Mann
man said. Professor of Psychology
PESC dispute continues

*

lonnie elder
_ _ CEREMONIES IN
~CY~DARK OLD MEN
Mendelssohn Theatre, January 26-29, 8 P.M.!
Price Wed. Thu. Fri. Sat. No. Office
150_
.o- --
- .00
Total $ (payable to University Players) Mail to:
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, Dept. of Speech, U-M, Ann Arbor 48104
--Window Sale begins Monday, Jan. 24, Mendelssohn, 12:30 p.m.
ENCLOSE SELF-ADDRESSED, STAMPED RETURN ENVELOPE

I

II

A new natural foods restaurant:
Naked Lunch
food as natural as life
inexpensive, carefully prepared.
LUNCH SERVED FROM 1 1:00-2:30 P.M.
MONDAY-FRIDAY
in the basement of the NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson, 761-1154

_ - _ i
i

NAME.

.TELEPHONE-

SAVE!
up to 331a%
Buy USED
TEXTBOOKS

Paraphernalia
announces
Welcome Back
SALE'
215 S. STATE
769-3340

(Continued from Page 1)
Sinclair courses as being based on
political grounds. University pro-'
fessors often call upon prominenti
members of the community to lec-
ture in their courses. Sinclair andi
Thomas, PESC members claim,.
are just as qualified, in their own
area, to instruct classes.
In a recent discussion with mem-;
bers of PESC, the LSA Executive
Committee posed several questions
relating to PESC's structure and;
p o s s i b 1 e implications, included:
among which were the following:
-Will the inclusion of commu-
nity members in University class-
es affect the quality of the coursesN
and/or tend to close them to regu-
lar students? PESC contends that
"community colleagues" can in-
crease the relevance of most
courses and, by merely auditing;
them, will not damage a student's:
chances for entry.
-Is it proper to allocate LSA
funds for a new program when a
2 per cent decrease in state fund-
ing for the University has created
Ii

an added financial strain -at all
levels? PESC answers that $50,000
has been set aside for "innovation"
in LSA, $4,600 of which would suf-
fice to finance PESC for this se-
mester. PESC members are now
shouldering the cost of the pro-
gram themselves.
-Is there enough time and space
available for the new program?
The instructors involved are will-
ing to extend their input of time
and energy to accommodate in-
creased enrollment, answers PESC.
This would include working out
suitable arrangements for students
who might object to the inclusion
of the public auditors.
PESC hopes to secure official
LSA sanction for its program by
presenting its case at tomorrow
night's literary college faculty
Imeeting.
The administration itself has left
the issue of PESC's official status
in limbo, offering no reaction to
PESC's failure to comply with
See PESC, Page'10
- ---

q

I

I

*i

MmISS LONELY HEARTS?
Your evenings are empty and boring. You are clumsy in class and
in the office. You need grooming. Your boss is threatening to let
you go.
Get help quick, Miss Lonely Hearts. Use those lonely nights to im-
prove your basic skills in Typing, Speedwriting, Dictation, and
Accounting. Join the gang 4 evenings a week from 6 to 9 by enroll-
ing now. For more information, call 769-4507. Classes last 12
weeks.

AT

FOLLETT'S
Michigan Book Store
State St. at North U.

Interested in finding a place to live in ISRAEL?
CHAVURAT ALIYAH
a group of college-age people seriously considering
going to Iserael to live, meets regularly on U. of M.
campus to share information, ideas, probems, and
solutions regarding immigration and life in Israel.
NEXT MEETING-Mon., Jan. 17-8 P.M.
at HILLEL-1439 Hill St.
SPEAKERS: AVREM SHUR, of Hashomer Hatzair
AMOTZ PELEG, of Habonim
TOPIC: Differences Among the Zionist
Youth Movements

,.

:-v::.:::rr.. ,--:-::>-xs>^ri ">:::, , c 3 f t e f

olf
muft-ft

V-000

The Student Art Gallery

grand

opening

"Mi.
Y..
6' K o
ysp
'-4Cl
'4.'.

i#

at Marty's
FOR THE VERY
BEST

Taylor Business Institute

621 E. William

Ann Arbor, Michigan

, 1

First Floor of the Union
Sunday, January 16
12:30 through 4:30

I

HELP YOURSELF AND
OTHERS TOO
University Activities Center
ANNOUNCES
The opening of petitioning for 1972-73 Senior Officer
positions
* President
* Administrative Vive-President
* Executive Vice-President
* Co-ordinating Vice-President
Petitions available in the UAC offices,

UpTo

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'2z

0ff

We Don't Just

Publish a Newspaper

V
{

EI
I

* We meet new people
" We laugh a lot
" We find consolation

SUITS
SPORTCOATS
Shirts, Slacks
Shoes, Sweaters,
Outerwear

o We play football

(once)

r We make money (some)
* We solve problems
" We debate vital issues
* We drink Sc Cokes

I

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