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February 27, 1972 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-27

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 27, 1972

'Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CONSPIRACY CASE:
Sister McAllister says
trial will not stifle her

'U' women's commission faces
barriers in discrimination fight

By JANET GORDON
"Conspiracy means literally
'to breath together'," says Sis-
ter Elizabeth McAllister.
McAllister, now on trial for
conspiracy along with Father
Phillip Berrigan and five
others in Harrisberg, Pa., spoke
yesterday to reporters and lis-
teners gathered at The Con-
spiracy coffeehouse.
"In these times, the government
is a conspiracy to destroy life.
Whenever men and women come
together to try to mae a life of
hope and truth, they risk the pos-
sibility of becoming a conspiracy,
enemies of the state," she said.
Earlier in the day McAllister dis-
cussed the complex development
of the government's conspiracy
charges.
The case first became public in
November 1970 when J. Edgar
Hoover, in a plea to a Senate
subcommittee for mo'e FBI funds,
claimed McAllister's group - the
East Coast Conspiracy to Save
Lives-was plotting to blow up
heating systems in Washington
and to kidnap a top government
official.
Two months later a grand jury
Indicted thirteen people on Hoov-
er's charges but then continued to
investigate and subpoena new wit-
nesses from all over tie country.
Many who refused to testify were
charged'with contempt.
McAllister explained that the
group would've been glad to have
answered Hoover's "absurd init-
ial charges" or "to stand trial for
acts which we have actually com-
mitted." "But," she continued, "we
fan't accept the government's idea
tJat all these things had to have
been masterminded by a brain
Frust."
McAllister explained to o n e
group that when people come to
4er asking if they could help she
replies, "Begin to talk to one an-
other. Build a small community of
action. Get Aver not caring and
Into caring with others."
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27
Day Calendar
TV Center Film: "The City and the
Campus," WWJ-TV, Channel 4, noon.
Family Recreation: Sports bldg. facil-
ties, 1I30 pm.
Dance Workshop: Carolyn Brown,
Barbour Studio, 2 pm.
Musical Society: Choral Union Series,
PraguecSymphony Orchestra, Hull Aud.,
8:30 pm.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28
SACUA: 4079 Admin. Bldg., 3 pm.
History of Art and Kelsey Museum:
D. White, "CYRENE 1971-Kelsey Mu-
seum Excavations in the Sanctuary of
Demeter," Aud. B, Angell Hall, 4 pmo.
Physics Seminar: A. Seidl, U. of Chi-
cago. "ElasticScattering and One Pion
P educton in K plus p Interactions
at 4.3 GeV/c," P&A Colloq. Rm, 4 pm.
Architecture and Design and Exten-
sion Serv: Museum Without Walls,
"The Cubist Epoch-Germany: Dada,"
Rackham Lecture Hall, 7:30 pm.
School of Music: J. Dapogny, "Scale
and Harmony in Jazz," Sch. of Mus.
Recital Hall, 8 pm.
General Notices
U of M students who wish to apply
for transfer from one undergraduate
school or col. to another should file
application with appropriate Admis-
sions Ofc. soon as possible, since ad-
mission to new unit is a prerequisite
for fall term preclassification; appli-
cant, should allow approx. two weeks
for, processing of applic. before seek-
ing appt, for preclassification; will pro-
vide time to have necessary records
sent to appropriate counseling ofc.;
questions, call 764-7433.
Placement Service
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
INTERVIEWS: you can sign up for
appts. with the following organizations
beginning tomorrow, Feb. 28; come in
or call 763-1363.
bM arch 13,hPeace Corps &Vista (see
below) March 14, Peace Corps & Vista
March, 15, Internal Revenue Service,
seeking all majors; Case Western Re-

serve Univ. Sch. of Mgt, Master's in
Mgt. Prog. substantial financial aide;
Travelers Insurance Co., all majors;
Voice of America (U.S.I.A.), seeking
students with academic and/or prac-
tical exposure to audio-communications
field.
ANNOUNCEMENT: In addition to
their regular needs, Peace Corps needs
200 teachers fluent in French to teach
English in W. African Countries (teach-
ing cert. not req.); also needs 50 peo-
pe with MA in French or applied Lin-
guistics, teachers in math & science,
industrial arts and vocational teach-
ers and craftsmen in all manual arts;
see campus Peace Corps recruiter, or
write Peace Corps/Action, Washington,
D.C. 20525, or call toll free 800-424-8580.
Michigan Union
Welcomes
CLEVE WASHINGTON
Afro-cuts and regular
MONDAYS 8:30-5:15 P.M.

SISTER ELIZABETH McALLISTER talks on conspiracy to a
local group.
AFTER 5 MONTHS
U' minority commission
achieves little progress

(Continued from Page 1)
has said the University, as a pub-
lic institution, is subject to the
"spirit" and not the "letter" of
the law.
If the appointment were made,
it is unclear how it would affect
the status of both the women's'
and minorfties commissions, al-
though Fleming said Friday, "It's
not a question of abolishing any-
thing."
"If we go the route of appoint-
ing an officer, we have to rethink
the roles of the commissions and
see if there are alternatives to the
present roles," says Fleming.
Just what those present roles
are and the degree of their effec-
tiveness is a question many Com-
mission members have been ask-
ing.
On the positive side, Chairwo-
man Nordin lists the following as
the three most concrete accom-
plishments of the Commission:
-The file review procedure, de-,
signed to locate and correct sal-
ary inequities between male and
female employes;
-The establishment of the
complaint procedure, through
which an employe may register a
complaint; and-
-L a s t November's Women's
Fair, a day - long information
event.
Less concrete, but equally im-
portant, is what Nordin describes
as "the impact the Commission
has rade in changing the climate
of opinion through the personal
contact with the various depart-
ments and officers."
But even in these major efforts,
some members feel they have en-
countered problems.
Zumeta cites the status of the
file review as a prime example.
Misrepresented as an inquisition
board for sex discrimination, it
actually consists of a computer
review which identifies women
with low salaries, and an analysis
of individual files.
In addition, a woman may re-
quest a review herself. In such
cases, the requested reviews are
mixed in with computer files to
achieve anonymity.
When the Personnel Office, the
supervisor, and the Commission
fail to reach an agreement on
whether a salary adjustment
should be made, the case goes be-
fore-1a review board.
Since it began last July, only
one case is pending a salary in-
crease as a result of the self-re-
quested review.
The insignificant number is at-
tributed to the long, involved pro-
cess which registering a complaint
involves.

Zumeta, who has been process-
ing the review almost entirely on
her own, advocates an across-the-
board raise for all women to re-
place the file review.
"We know the percentage dif-
ference between male and female
salaries, so just up the salaries by
that amount," she says.
The suggestion, however, has
gained little support.
In a memorandum released re-
cently, Fleming reaffirmed April
15 as the deadline for review ques-
tions and July 1 as the deadline
for the computer-run review.
Obvious disagreement between
University officials and Commis-
sion members stems from this
area.
Spokeswoman Sally Buxton de-
fines the conflict. "Women are
taught that they shouldn't make
waves and shouldn't aspire to
higher positions.
Buxton says women employes
have told the commission stories
of supervisor retaliation when wo-
men attempt to transfer to an-
other department.
Zumeta adds that while the
University is willing to admit that
minority programs should be es-
tablished in order to account for
cultural differences, they are not
willing to admit the same for
women.
Yet, she says, "It is valid to
make the cultural deprivation
theory apply to women except
when it is called socialization
differences."
Nordin believes some officers
erroneously see women simply as
"slightly smaller men."
The executive officers feel the
criticism is unjust. "The executive
officers are willing to listen and
give consideration to commission
recommendations," says V i c e
President for State Relations and
Planning Fedele Fauri.
"I haven't always agreed with
them, but I'm glad they've been
around," he adds.
When asked to comment on the
criticism, Vice President f o~r
Academic Affairs Allan Smith,
said, "I'd like to ask what they
have recommended that we have
not supported?"
Fleming, Fauri, and Smith all
agree that the major contribution

of the commission is the increas-
ing campus-wide awareness of the
affirmative action program.
Recently, each executive offic-
er appointed a member of his own
office to ensure that each new of-
fice hire complies with the af-
firmative action program.
Smith also points to his office's
personnel review which resulted in
salary increases for 52 academic
women.
Aside from criticism of admin-
istration attitudes, the Commis-'
sion has many disagreements
with the Personnel Office. They
charge that their recommenda-
tions are impeded and any change
is a needlessly slow process.
For example, commission in-
vestigation revealed certain em-
ployment practices which hinder
the hiring and promotion of wo-
men.
The study said women have tra-
ditionally been left out of consid-
eration for higher positionspbe-
cause such jobs are usually pub-
licized by word of mouth.
Last fall, a Commission commit-
tee recommended changes that
included provisions for public
job posting for both academic and
non-academic positions.
Also included were . proposed
changes in transfer procedures.
Currently, an employe is required
to obtain the present supervisor's
signature before a transfer could
be considered.
This, says committee chairwo-
man Judy Milestone, "deterred a
lot of women from attempting a
transfer because they didn't want
their boss to know they were
shopping around."
There -were also cases reported
of supervisors refusing to sign the
form.
Since recommended last fall,
they have met all types of bar-
riers, and according to Milestone,
won't go into effect until the end
of the fiscal year.

WARD CHAPMAN
Chief trial lawye.r-Genesee County
Prosecutor's Office
THE PROSECUTOR'S ROLE
IN SOCIETY
Wed., March 1, 4:15 p.m.
LAW CLUB LOUNGE
The Center for Continuing Education of Women
and the Department of Physical Education
PRESENT
SELMA JEANNE COHEN
Historian of Dance; Editor, Dance Perspectives
"Woman as Artistic Innovator:
The Case of the Choreographer"
8 p.m., Wednesday, March 1
Rackham Amphitheatre

"Women in Perspective" Lecture Series
PUBLIC INVITED

*
'S

FREE

I

(Continued from Page 1)
equal employment action and said
the suggested officer would be,
"the most functional, effective
method" of bringing about equity
if he had the power to penalize
financially unco-operative groups.
However, members disagreed as
to whether the commission should
continue to exist if the single
officer plan is implemented. Dr.
William Cash Jr., assistant to the
president and chairman of the
Minority Commission, favors con-
tinuation.
"I think it's worth keeping for
the purpose of constantly monitor-
ing the affirmative action pro-
gram," Cash says. Other members
said a single officer could take
over the functions of the commis-
sion.
Since its first meeting in Octo-
ber, the commission has concern-
ed itself with discussions of salary
equality, hiring, and promotion in
various departments with respect
to minority group members.
"The accomplishments at this
point haven't been of any extent,"
remarked commission m e m b e r
Shirley Martin, administrative as-
sistant in the Medical School.
Martin cited problems of finding
a meeting time convenient for the
members, many of whom have ex-
tensive teaching or job commit-
ments.
Meeting every two weeks, the
commission usually draws between
50 and 75 per cent attendance,
Cash said.
Members agree that the commis-
sion has the capacity to be effec-
tive once it gets warmed up, how-
ever. Romance Language Prof.
Raleigh Morgan says the commis-
sion has spent its time since Oc-
tober "identifying things we'd like
to do."
He says the commission has
needed the time since its estab-
For the student body:
FLARES
by
Levi
Farah
Wright
Lee
Male

lishment to familiarize itself with
the organization of tht University,
and to gain contact and influence
with the various schools and de-
partments.
Martin too said she thought the
commission was now in the posi-
tion to become effective, although
she doubted it could "tackle any
major blocks."
Opinion varied among members
as to the commission's major ac-
complishments. Cash praised the
group's effectiveness in avoiding
duplication in data collection by
close co-operation with the wo-
men's commission. He said this.
co-operation cut costs and added
to the information available to the
minority commission.
Lavastida cited the recent de-
mand of regional HEW spokesmen
for minority group salary and pro-
motion information as a major
success for the commission, which
had proposed a similar study.
Many HEW requests for infor-
mation have anticipated commis-
sion needs, Cash said.

I

6

I'

I

HILLEL PRESENTS A DEBATE ON
"Internationalizing the Latke
and the Hamentash"
PRO- Dr. Marvin Feiheim
Prof. of English
and
Prof. Gerda Seligson
Classical Studies
ANTI- Dr. Harriet Mills
Assoc. Prof. of Chinese
and
Dr. James O'Neill
Prof. of French
8:30 P.M. Monday, Feb. 28 at HILLEL, 1429 Hill

ROUND TRIP JET FROM DETROIT
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DEPART/RETURN
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COST
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CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

Anyone interested in this cultural situation may
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Applicants should phone 764-0166 between
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For All Flights, The Following DAILY Connecting Flights Are Available:

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ON THE WATERFRONT
Marion Brando, Karl Malden, Eva Marie Saint, Lee J. Cobb, Rod Steiger
Crime and Corruption on the New York waterfront. Winner 8 Academy

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