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February 27, 1972 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-27

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Page Two

Three by Foon
featured at RC

Forest fires berm
more than trees

By M. L9 DlUC J. LAINE
Bad reviews are so much more
fun to write than good ones. It
is therefore, much to my cha-
grn, I am forced to admit that
Foon Fair is fantastic. Consid-
erifig the muck that passes it-
self off as theatre in this town,
FOn Fair is a pleasant (if
unexpected) surprise.
Opening night. V'arious A n n
Arbor nobility assume t h e i r
bokes and loges in the Residen-
tial College Auditorium. Some
noise and seated in the house
is a rather curious looking gen-
tlemann asking, ever so politely,
if you might care for some
bananas or peanut shells. I de-
'dined. Lights out.
Two figures in white tights
climb- down a rope suspended
.from the balcony and ."Snow,
Flake" begins. Running through
the house, tumbling over seats
and rspectators, taunted by en-
emy *potights our, two tight
clad hero seek an escape. Safe
for an instant they find refuge
on the stage. A moment of re-
treat. They vat their bananas
and peanut shells. Safe for a
little while. Safe to think and
remember. To remember t h e
pa aland lose themselves in one
another and the sea. Then an
.incredible thing happens. Two.
actors (author Dennis Foon and
:Patrick McCord, as his o t h e r
half)- turn the stage -into an un-
dulating fabric of ocean waves.
The swaying body replaces the
cumbersome need for words. We
are lost in. -the fluid rhythm of
space. Brilliantly directed by
Richard Sale, I am reminded of
Artaud's theatre; playing not
only to the audience but with it
and among it until the stage be-
cpmes, 'just one small aspect of
the larger . theatre -- the one

you are siting in as you read
this review. Patrick McCord has
been acting in Ann Arbor for
three years that I can remember
here. Sometimes he's on and
sometimes he's not. This is a
good part for him and he plays
it well. Very strong and increas-
ingly graceful, he manages to
transform movement into. dance..
More spotlights. The enemy for-
ever present, consuming and be-
ing consumed.
No light and we awaken in
the world of "Grumpy", author
Dennis Foon. Grumpy is Rich-
ard Sale (yes, the same one)
and Richard Sale is, for the most
part, Grumpy. Grumpy is a
cripple and Grumpy is in pain
and Grumpy is trapped in a
world of imbecile clowns and'
shrewish females. But there is
an escape: it's as easy as turn-
ing into a monkey. If you think
about it - it's the only way.
Of course, eventually you real-
ize that you are acting like a
monkey. The conscious mind re-
gains control, you just don't
feel comfortable as a monkey,
and that's when you blow it.
You force yourself back down
and when you get there, y o u
find someone waiting; waiting to
attack. The, enemy awaits -
but you need an enemy for the
struggle, for the show, to get
you off. And so now grumpy
realizes he needs his enemy. It
is at that moment when t h e
enemy decides he no longer
wishes to be the enemy. He de-
cides to leave. And when that
happens - well, there isn't too
much left to do. Unless, that is,
you just feel like hanging out.
Director, Richard Lehfeldt did
not do, all that he could have.
A general lack of movement left
the characters awkwardly an-

ru
RES. COLLEGE
Q CREATIVE ARTS
FESTIVAL
FREE E
FOON
0 FAIRv
3 original plays
7Jp.m.
THURS., FEB. 24
FRIt., FEB. 25
USAT., FEB. 26
v East Quad Aud. FREE!
Join The Daily

hom*annPictufws
Presents
HAROWD
and
MAUIE

chored -in picturesque but dra-
matically useless positions,
meanwhile the pace occasionally
gets lost -in the lack of snuffle.
Save for Mr. Sale's presence
and power of character, "Grum-
py" would not have succeeded
as its does. But before Mr. Leh-
feldt's loyal fans and family
commence their poison pen let-
ters addressed to my humble
self, please be advised that as
the lead character, Rome, in
"Rebecca" (the final F o o a
Fantasmagorical) he is quite
charming. A Quaint little story
about butterflies who rip out
your eyes, a father and son re-
union and the tender love of
three men and one little girl for
a dismembered little beauty that
called herself Rebecca - though
everyone knew her as "dolly".
The play is as macabre as it is
singularly witty and funny.
Directed by Patrick McCord
(yes . . .) the action moves in-
terestingly enough, though again,
from time to time the actors
find themselves caught in un-
likely and not particularly pleas-
ing places. Bolin, the brutal sim-
pering father, is ani excellently
written character. Unfortunate-

ly, Bob Zarzar (zar) throws
away many opportunities to
create and build Bolin's bstre)-
erous personality, Mr. Zarzar
hurries through his part as if
he were anxious to get off stage
(an entirely unacceptable and
ignominious concept to actors).
Well, give Mr, Foon the gold-
en apple from the top of the
glass mountain. He is the eve-
ning's hero. A young playwrite
who can create theatre good
enough not to be produced at
the Power Center; imagine that.
Accolades to Richard S a 1 e,
Patrick McCord and the vener-
able Mr. Lehfeldt for perform-
ances equal to their determina-
tion to do something well. As
for the good Christians - to the
lions.
6th WEEK NOW!
At State and Liberty
pTogfATE
Program Information 662-6264

-Daily-Terry McCarthy
For the Student Body:
SALE
* Jeans
" Bells
" Flares
'/z off
[CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

UAC-Daystar Presents
ALICE
COLTRANE
LEON
THOMAS
Contemporary
Jazz Quintet
MARCH 11, FRIDAY
8 p.m. Hill Aud.
2.00-3.50-4.00-4.50
Reserved Seats Now On Sale
Mich. Union 12-6 p.m. M-F

Color by Tehnicolor'
AT 1-3-5-7-9
DIAL8-6416

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women Now
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Fine Winter Jazz'

By GENE ROBINSON
Last July 18 thousands of
California music fans enjoyed a
rare presentation of the very
best-in jazz. -World renowned
jaez .mUsicians gave virtuoso
perfotmanes in a special "Sum-
'mer Jazz" concert. Tonight,
rea jazz fans will see a similar
concert, as a "Winter Jazz" con-
cert will be held in Detroit's
Ford Aud. at 8 p.m.
.The performance will feature
such jazz luminaries as guitarist
George Benson, trumpeter BFred-
die Hubard, flutist Hubert Laws,
'tenor saxophoiis-t Stanley Tur-
rentine, 'saxophonist hank Craw-
fotd; organist Johnny Hammond,
Bassists Ron Carter, percussion-
fst Afirtb, alto saxophonist Grov-
er Washington, Jr., singer Es-
ther Phillips and drummer Ber-
nard Purdie.
'This concert was organized be-
cause of the success of the sum-
mer jazz program. A newsalbum
has recently been released of
the . "Summer Jazz" presenta-
- tion. Called "California C o n -
cert," the album effectively cap-
tures the extraordinary vitality
-and usicianship of the summer
ioncert, and predicts the greatA
music to come out of Detroit to-
night.
The album is a professional,
finely-hbned presentation from
start. to finish, but still captures
much of the excitement of the
' performance itself. Soloists Ben-
son,, Hubbard, Laws, Turrentine,
Crawford and Hammond impro-
.ise, beautifully throughout, lean-
ing heavily on a solid rhythm
section of Carter, Airto and
drummer Billy Cobham.
The album opens with an
avant-garde arrangement of
James Taylor's "Firs and Rain."
The number is kicked off with
a slow, eerie solo by Laws, mak-
ing the song sound more like it
came from the jungle than from
? the back woods of North Caro-
klina. The band then goes into
t up-tempo improvisations on the

song's basic theme, with Laws
and Benson soloing. The num-
ber ends as it began, with Laws'
unworldly flute sounds.
Then comes 'the showpiece of
the album, "Red Clay." Writ-
ten by Hubbard, the song shows
the musicians at their best. Tur-
rentine and Benson each offer
fluid, beautiful and innovative
solos, but the true star of the
song is Hubard himself: Long
one of the best trumpeters
around, Hubbard is finally begin-
ning to challenge' the great
Miles himself for first chair. His
solo here is perhaps the best
on the entire albumi - always
moving, always new, always
alive.
Then comes a more traditional
jazz number, "Sugar" by Tur-
rentine. He of course is the star
of this one, playing his sax for
all it's worth. While his solo is
not especially new, it is re-
markable for its clarity,- and
fluidness. Hubbard takes anoth-
er solo on this one, again play-
ing very well. Benson shows his
talent here also, in one of t h e
more imaginative guitar solos
I have heard.
Here a word must be said
about the extraordinary rhythm
section, highlighted by Carter's
bass. Carter is unquestionably
one of the very best bassists in
the world, and is especially ef-
fective throughout with s u c h
fine musicians supporting him.
His too infrequent solos are
imaginative and different. Cob-
ham and Airto play flawlessly
throughout.
The remainder of the double
album is a bit anticlimactic, es-
pecially after the dynamite first,
two sides. "Blues West",, which
takes up all of side three; sounds
contrived and stilted from t h e
start and cannot be saved even
by some excellent solos. "Leav-
ing West," which makes up side
four,comes off much better, as
Carter sets an interesting back-
ground for solos by Turrentine

z Detroit
and'Benson.
Grover Washington, Jr., sched-
uled to apear in Sunday's con-
cert, is a very capable saxo-
phonist and should add signmfi-
cantly to the excitement. His
new album, "Inner City Blues,"
displays some excellent work,
especially on the title song, and
on "Better Days," a beautiful
piece.
Also to appear and also with
an album just released is singer
Esther Philips. The album,
"From a Whisper to a Scream."
is in places, a bit too slick,
but Phillips' voice is always
true, always excellent. H i g h -
lights of the disc include a fast-
moving version of "Home is
Where the Hatred Is," and th
beautiful title song.
The summer concert was crit-
icized harshly as jazz purists
claimed the artists were selling
out by asembling for such a one-
shot performance.rBuththe al-
bums described above, even
though commercially successful,
have lost no musical integrity.
They are as true as any jazz al-
bums around. Tonight's "Winter
.Jazz" concert should be even
better. I wouldn't miss it..

I

OPEN1 p.m. SHOWS AT
1 :15-3:10-5-7-9 P.M.
Feature Starts 5 min. later

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LAST CHANCE-2:30!

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The Damned depicts the moral corruption of Hitler's rise to
power. Directed by Luchino Visconti, and including an inter-
national cast, it is a movie of importance not for its timeli-
ness, but as Visconti suggests, "because we must see to it,
that what happened in those days in Germany must not
come again."
Although it is not a documentary, The Damned utilizes a
number of historical events to expose the corruption and
perversity that characterized Hitler's reign.
The story deals with an aristorcratic German family whose
fortune lies in the success of their steel and munitions plant.
Forced by the changing political temper of the country to
alter their way of life, the leadership of the family is thrown
into turmoil. After the apolitical head of the family is killed,
there is a struggle between the remaining members for power.
The presidency is first given to an ambitious industrialist
(Dirk Bogarde) who with the help of an aging widower
(Ingrid Thulin) believes he can run the plant free of outside
influence.
However, the presence of a Nazi protagonist (Helmut Griem)
Is too overbearing and in the end the widower's son (Helmut
Berger) is taken in by the Nazi movement and -..
Visconti, who also had a hand in writing the script, has
parallel dthe external destruction of Germany with an equally
devastating ruination of internal order, which closely re-
sembles a Macbethian air of power-hungry individuals. As
Hitler's forces deceitfully overrun their rivals, so is the family
destroyed by corruption and favors seasoned with ulterior
The film is cataclysmic in exhibiting the Nazi experience as a
motives.

breeding ground for perversities. And the movie is more than
properly titled for it is the damnation of those persons who
preached Nazism that Visconti attacks.
Besides Visconti's expert handling of the material, special
consideration must be given to the cast for their perform-
ances.
Thulin, as the perfect Lady Macbeth type, is haunting in her
portrayal. She is probably the best known for her work in
Ingrid Bergman films, like The Hour of the Wolf, but her job
in The Damned definitely adds yet another notch to her
number of accomplishments.
'The star of the film must be newcomer Berger. He is marvel-
ous as the mentally disturbed grandson. Even though he is
surrounded by formidable peers, he is still able to steal many
a scene and make an impression on the audience as a memor-
able actor.
It is frightening to think that such a blood-thirsty revolt as
world, and it is at the same time fortunate that a man of
that which beseiged Germany could occur in the modern
Visconti's caliber can retell the story in order for us all, to
learn a lesson.
Many of today's young movie audience has little but a his-
torical knowledge of how Hitler corrupted Germany and the
world, yet it is important that we go beyond the facts and
figures and reveal the repulsive ugliness of that moment of
history. The Damned may seem dull and out of date to those
caught up in the acceleration of day to day living, but it a
brilliant film in structure and purpose. And it remains to be
seen whether the world has learned from this experience.
-DONALD KUBIT, The Michigan Daily, May 12, 1970
(Reprinted by permisison of the author)

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"Dustin Hoffman's
performance since
night Cowboy'

finest
'Mid-

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TUESDAY! - February 29th - ONLY!
auditorium a, angell hall a 35mm Color Cinemascope Z 7& 9:45 p.m.-75c

"A DELIGHTFUL COMEDY!"

NAME 1

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