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February 25, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-25

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Friday, February 25, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Friday, February 25, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

Wings
By The Associated Press
DETROIT -- Red Berenson and
rookie Marcel Dionne each scored
yesterday as the Detroit Red'
Wings whipped the Vancouver
Canucks 2-0 and regained sole pos-
session of fourth place in the Na-
tional Hockey League's East Divi-
sion.
Detroit climbed two points ahead
of Toronto in the race for the final
playoff spot in the East and the
Red Wings still have two games
in hand.
Berenson scored his 25th goal
I of the season at- 10:05 of the first
period on a setup from lnemate
Guy Charron.
Dionne clinched the victory with
his 19th goal of the season at 8:33
of the final period, skating the
length of the ice and firing a hard
Apply ,nowz!
NEW YORK (P-Walter Kn
Kedy, commissioner of the Na-
tional Basketball Association,
said yesterday' that any under-
graduate who wishes to be elig-
r ble for the league's hardship
college draft- must apply to the
NSA office by March 30.
slap shot past goalie Dune Wilson.
The Red Wings now have lost
only once in their last 118 home
starts.
Hawks stabbed
BUFFALO, N.Y. - The Buffalo
Sabres erupted for four goals in
the lust nine minutes of the third
period yesterday to stun ,the Chi-

wallop,

2-0

TAYLOR, BEHAGEN WAIT:
Gopher case in limbo

flaily
sports
WrrnYWT 'flnvmnn

NIG T EITR:
CHUCK BLOOM
cago Black Hawks 5-3 in a Na-
tional Hockey League game.
Rick Martin, who sets a record
for rookies every time he scores
a goal, slammed in what proved to
be the winner, connecting for his
40th of the season with about two
minutes to play. Danny Lawson
then sealed the victory with i n
empty-net tally 10 seconds from
the buzzer..
Steve Atkinson put the Sabres
in front after just nine seconds of
play but Chicago grabbed a 2-1
lead before the first period ended
on scores by Dennis Hull and Bill
White.
After a scoreless second period,
Mike Byers tied it for Buffalo at
the 11:13 mark of the third and
the Sabres went ahead less than
two minutes later on Don Lace's
goal.
But Hull, :getting his second of
the night and 20th of the season,
brought the Black Hawks back
into a tie before Martin's un-
assisted goal. After the shaky first
period, Roger Crozier was bril-
liant in the Sabres goal, facing 40
Chicago shots.

Hqbs happy
MINNEAPOLIS - Claude La-
rose's third-period goal fired into
an open net blunted a Minnesota
rally, and iced a 4-2 Montreal vic-
tory over the North Stars i a
National Hockey League game of
changing fortunes yesterday.
'Montreal took a 3-0 lead as it
dominated the first half of the
contest with some close fore-check-
ing. The North Stars rallied for
two goals in the second period,
only to have the Canadiens sur-
vive the charge on Larose's goal
at X9:02 of the final period and
some stellar netminding by big
Ken Dryden.
Dryden had just repulsed two
open shots by Dennis Hextall and
Bill Goldsworthy when Jim Rob-
erts swept in on Minnesota goalie
Cesare Maniago, who slid out to
knock away his shot. In recover-
ing, Maniago left the net unat-
tended and in the flurry Larose
trammed home the decisive goal.

By The Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn.-Athletic
directors or their representatives
from all, Big Ten- Conference
schools began a closed-door meet-
ing yesterday morning to consider
the playing eligibility of two Min-
nesota basketball players who have
been under suspension since the
Jan. 25 brawl with Ohio State.
Three athletic directors were
missing, Elroy Hirsch of Wiscon-
sin, George King of Purdue and
Biggie Munn of Michigan State.
J. Bert Smith, who is acting ath-
letic director at Michigan State
because of Munn's incapacitation,
represented that school. Hirsch
was represented by an assistant,
Robert Bell, and Ray Eddy, an
assistant at Purdue, represented
King.,
Minnesota Athletic Director Paul
Giel was the last to arrive at
the meeting and after he entered,
the doors were locked and curtains
drawn on corridor windows.
The athletic directors of Ohio
State, MichiganandrMinnesota
agreed to withdraw from voting
on the playing eligibility of two
Minnesota basketball players, Mar-
vin "Corky" Taylor and Ron Be-
hagen.
W.H.H. "Tippie" Dye, North-
western athletic director, said Ed
Weaver of Ohio State, Paul Giel
of Minnesota and Don Canham of
Michigan had decided to abstain
from voting.
The session broke up after a
couple hours. The athletic direc-
tors adjourned for lunch and said
they would resume their delibera-
tions at 1:30 p.m.
Information about what was go-
ing on within the room, where they

This Weekend in Sports

TODAY

- rt

HOCKEY-at Notre Dame
TRACK--Michigan Open, Yost Fieldhouse, 6:30 p.m.
WRESTLING--Big Ten Championships, at Bloomington
GYMNASTICS-at,Michigan Stage,
SWIMMING-at Southern Methodist
TOMORROW
BASKETBALL--Minnesota, Crisler Arena, 2 p.m.
FRESHMAN BASKETBALL-Central Michigan, Crisler Arena,
11:45 a.m.
HOCKEY-at Notre Dame
WRESTLING-Big Ten Championships, at Bloomington
GYMNASTICS-Illinois, Crisler Arena 4 p.m.
TENNIS-Michigan Alumni-Varsity Match at Huron Valley
Tennis Club, 1 p.m.
SWIMMING-at Texas (Austin)
MONDAY
FRESHMAN BASKETBALL-at Michigan State

I I . I,; , -In

-Associated Press
DETROIT'S MICKEY REDMOND skates past two Vancouver
Canucks in last night's 2-0 shutout in the Olympia. With the win,
the Red Wings climb back into fourth place.

McDANIELS RESTRAINED:
Allen signs White Sox contract

sat around a long table, was
sketchy. 'Curtains were' drawn to'
windows facing onto a hotel corri-
dor and newsmen were told not
to enter the corridor.
Pat Mueller,. University of M n-
nesota physical education direc-.
tor, talked to the group for 20
minutes but there was no word on
what he said.
Attorneys for the players had
asked, in advance of the meeting,
that Weaver and Canham be pre-
vented from voting oecause they
had prejudged the case.
Byron Gregory, Big Ten attor-
ney, said a written decision of
their findings on whether to con-

tinue the suspensions of the two
University of Minnesota basketball
players will be made available be-
fore 6 p.m. today.
U.S. District Court Judge Earl
R. Larson had ordered Big Ten
Commissioner Wayne Duke to pro-
vide' a hearing on charges by, 6
p.m. today, or the season-long sus-
pensions would automatically be
lifted.
Both Taylor and Behagen were
present at yesterday's hearing at
a Minneapois hotel, and apparent-
ly explained their ,side of the
action.

SProfessional League Standings

NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Boston 46 23 .667
New York 41 24 .631
Philadelphia 25 41 .379
Buffalo 18 47 .276
Central Division
Baltimore 28 37 .431
Atlanta 25 40 .385
Cincinnati 22 44 .333
Cleveland 19 48 .284
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division

GB
3
19/
26
3'
6Y2
10
5/
12
29 4
14^
14
28
41

Tonight's Games
Boston at Buffalo
Portland at Cleveland
Atlanta vs. Philadelphia at
Hershey, Pa.
Phoenix at Chicago
Cincinnati at Los Angeles
NHL
East Division

By The Associated Press
SARASOTA, Fla.-Chapter I in
the Chicago White Sox' courtship
of Richie Allen apparently ended
satisfactorily yesterday with the
commitment by the oft-controver-
sial Allen's agent to a $100,000-
plus contract, tops. in the Pale
Hose's 71-year history.
However, there still remains for
Allen, acquired from the Los An-
geles Dodgers, to show up in the
White Sox camp and formally put
the pen to terms accepted via tele-
phone by Alfred Morris, a Phila-
delphia accountant representing
well-traveled Richie.
After a 15-minute conversation
with Morris, Sox general manager
Stu Holcomb said yesterday a ver-
bal agreement was made for a
1972 salary in excess of $100,000.
* * *
McDaniels bedeviled
SEATTLE-Jim McDaniels, the
7-foot jumper from the American
Four Figure Cowboy
Les Witte became the first Wyo-
ming Cowboy ever to score over
1000 career points in basketball
when he passed that mark in 1934.

Basketball Association, may be the
most restrained ballpalyer in the
National Basketball Association.
A restraining order obtained by
the Carolina Cougars of the ABA,
McDaniels' old team, Was served
last night on the Seattle Super-
Sonics' newest emigre from the
ABA.
However, the Sonics also have
a restraining order of their own
,o keep McDaniels playing.
"We'll have to study this and
then figure where we go," said
Sonics' attorney Mel Monheimer.
Oral Roberts scores
NEW YORK-Dwight Lamar of
Southwestern Louisiana is setting
a fast individual scring pace for
major college basketball teams,
but it's nothing compared with

that of the Oral Roberts Univer-
sity team.
Oral Roberts, a free-wheeling
team with a 20-1 record, looks like'
a sure bet to set the all-time scor-
ing record, according to figures
released yesterday by the National
Collegiate Sports Services.
The relatively new Oklahoma
university is averaging 105.8 points
a game and needs only moderate
performances in the remaining
games to become the sport's new
offensive all-time champion.
Termpaper Arsenal, Inc.
send $1.00 for your descriptive
catalog of 1,300 quality termpapers
519 Glenrock Ave., Suite 203
Los Angeles, Calif. 90024
(213) 477-8474 477-5493
"we need a local salesman"

Boston
New York
Montreal
Detroit
Toronto
Buffalo
Vancouver

W L T.
45 8 9
40 11 10
34 14 12
27 25 9
26 27 11
13 .35 14
16 38 5
West Division

Pts GF
99 259
90 266
80 226
63 201
61 160
40 159
37 148

Milwaukee
Chicago
Phoenix
Detroit
Los Angeles
Golden Stat
Seattle
Houston
Portland

53 15
47 20
41 27
23 43
Pacific Division
54 11
to 40 25
41 26
26 39
15 54

.779
.701
.603
.348
.831
.615
.612
.400
.217

GA
141
143
158
190
172
228
210
128
140
201
231
187
197
242

For the Student Body:
LEVI'S
Corduroy
Bells

Chicago 38 16 7 83
Minnesota 32 20 9 73
St. Louis 21 32 9 51
California 18 30 14 50
Philadelphia 18 31 11 47
Pittsburgh 18 34 9 45
Los Angeles 16 40 7 39
Yesterday's4Results
Buffalo 5, Chicago 3
Detroit 2, Vancouver 0
Montreal 4, Minnesota 2

198
165
169
171
146
147
155

Yesterday's Results
Cincinnati 106, Buffalo 97
Detroit vs. Golden State, inc.
Only games scheduled

Swimmers journey into 'Texas
to take on Southern Methodist

We have the BEST
REPAIRS and SERVICE
around-TRY US
SPORTS CAR SERVICE
OF ANN ARBOR, Inc.
4705 Washtenaw
(next to Ypsi-Ann drive in)
434-01 10
T-W-F-8-6; M and Th 8-9
CHINA PROGRAM
" FILMS on China
" DISPLAYS: including caligraphy
and acupuncture
* SLI DES of a recent stay in China
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22-7:30 P.M.
ANN ARBOR PUBLIC LIBRARY

I

State Street at Liberty

", -

By CHUCK BLOOM
According to Michigan swim coach Gus
Stager, two weeks ago the Wolverinesdidn't
stand a chance against Southern Methodjst. But
after last weekend, Stager can afford to be a
little more optimistic.
The Wolverines pulled themselves together,
after the whipping received at Indiana, to beat
a strong Ohio State squad, 63-53. Meanwhile,
the Mustangs wentover to Tennessee and were
soundly defeated, 80.5-32.5.
"To say the least, SMU swam terribly," says
mentor Stager. "I know Tennessee is good, but
so is SMU. Their times have been going up
steadily. I really think we have a chance to
:beat them."
The Mustangs have several blue-chip swim-
mers, and beside having the home advantage,
they are better than the Wolverines.
"There is no doubt that they are better than
w are", Stager said, "but they are swimming
poorly. If we can get the breaks like we did
at Ohio State, we'll win this thing."
At Columbus, key races were swum by Ray
McCullough in the 200 yard freestyle and Chris
Hansen in the 200 yard backstroke. Stager had
especially high praises for Hansen's perform-
ance as being one of the key to that victory.
Southern Methodist has an abundance of fine
tankers. Perhaps the best is Jerry Heidenreich,
a versatile freestyler. Heidenreich swims both

sprints and long endurance races. Michigan's
Jose Aranha will meet him in the 50 yard free-
style while McCullough, innthe 200d will at-
tempt to reproduce another superlative effort.
Stu Isaac will have his hands full in both the
200 yard individual medley and breaststroke.
The Mustangs' John Rubbottom will test the
Amherst, N.Y. native severely in the I.M. while
Larry'Driver is Isaac's opponent in the breast-
stroke.
Michigan's butterfly trio of Byron MacDon-
ald, Augusto Gonzalez and Larry Day should
give Michigan the top two places in that event.
One of the constantly improving areas on the
team has been diving. It was Joe Crawford
finishing second in both the one-meter and
three-meter events, who sparked the OSU win.
The Mustangs' number one diver is Cal Locke,
who made it to the NCAA finals two years ago.
But Locke was beaten by a pair of Tennessee
divers, not of the same caliber.
According to diving coach Dick Kimball,
"Locke can be beaten, and Crawford has done
it before. We might even take one-two, if we're
lucky."
Luck seems to be the key to tonight's meet
in Dallas. The tankers should have no prob-
lem in Austin when they meet Texas. But as
Stager said, if they can hold their own in the
first half of the meet, take the key races in the
second half, Michigan will be victorious in the
Lone Star State.

.People are not just the cause
of the"ouainproblem"

"

They're also thms.

om

NO

MARCH

JUST RECEIVED-
Raichie Boots
(one style only)
for men and women-
Price starts at $24.00

Traffic jams. Overcrowded
schools. Inadequate housing.
Increasing unemployment.
Pollution. Almost any urban,
social and environmental
problem you can name is fast
becoming a nightmare.
And in one way or another
affects us all.
Of course, these problems
would still exist even if popula
tion growth were zero, because
population growth is not their
basic cause. Therefore solving
them must obviously become
society's number one priority.
However, the pressures of an
ever-increasing population tend
to intensify our problems. And
make them harder to solve.
(By the year 2000, Census
Bureau projections estimate
our population could grow close
to 300 million. That's about 100
million more people to house,
transport, educate, feed and
clean up after!)
This intensifying of problems
by sheer numbers of people can
also occur in individual house-
holds. For just as "too many
people" make society's problems
more difficult to solve, the
problems of raising a family..
are not made easier when there
are "too many children."
Under the circumstances, we
foal +iIfb ' l n1 nar ann fn

RENT

ALL TENANTS of the following management compan-
ies are advised to deposit March rents into the Tenants
Union Rent-Freez-Violation Escrow Account:
Hall Management Co.-Ambassador Co.-Ann Arbor Trust-
Arbor Forest-Campus Management-Charter Realty-Dahl-
mann Apartments-Hamilton Apartments-Summit Associates-
Walden Management-Wilson White Co.-Bell Development-
Student Inns Inc.-Post Realty-McKinley Associates-Roberts
Managers-Art Carpenter-Raymond Harary-Sarah Seingold

Photo by Leonard ong~
There's-also oly one time to
have that child: when it's
wanted. When it can be a
welcome addition rather than
an accidental burden.
Unfortunately, research has
consistently shown that not
enough Americans (from every
walk of life) are aware of the
benefits of family planning.
Or even how to go about it.
That's what we're all about.
And frankly, we can use all
the help we can get.
Especially from thoughtful
people who understand how
unplanned pregnancies can
intensify the already severe
problems society has still
to solve.
People who will, at the very
least, help others understand
that the population problem not
only has a cause. It hasvictiis.

By denositinn vnilr rprt intn Pcrrn"-w vni r Ammnnctrnta vn, it 'jnnnr fnit fi nrr4

I

1

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