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February 20, 1972 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-20

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Sundtoy, Ftbruary 2'0, 1972

THE MICHIU^N vAILY

pogi Five

Sunc~y, F~bruory 20, '1972 THE MICHI.,AN VAILY Pog~ Five

the sunday daily

0 a nd at I
fBy RiCH LEVY in fact going.to China "to promote
and LES AOSS peace and understanding." To cri-
JULY 11, 1971, President ticize the trip would be like cri-
ixon appeared on nation-wide ticizing Mother and Apple Pie and
television and announced that. he could only tarnish the image of
would soon make atrip to Peking. a nation united behind its Presi-
uldnescrnmke a a trprisoek no.dent After the initial announce-
This news came as a surprise notme thWheHusstf p.
only to the American people and ment, the White House staff spe-
to the allies of the United States, cifically asked that speculation
but also to everyone in the U.S. about the trip be kept to a mini-
government with the exceptions of mum. In this manner, Nixon hoped
Nixon himself, Henry Kissinger:byo the inevitable criticism
and a small handful of presidential by his opponents had he presented
confidants. the plan for discussion and ap-

home

poses of the trip began to be some-' The President's China Trip,

istence of) not because it will pro-, sible left within the Republican

what obfuscated. The continued
publicity given to the great "break-j
through" by our great "peace-
maker" President continued to;
draw attention away from the con-

Nonetheless, at present Nixon is tect South Vietnam, not because

still using the China trip to divert
attention away from the economic
and political problems -onfront-
ing the U.S. Television specials on

it will pressure Nortn Vietnam in-

possessed a familiarity with Chi-
nese politics and whose function!
it was to advise the government
on p o 1 i c y decisions regarding
China, Nixon prefered to rely on
a small group of White House ad-
visors headed by his favorite sec-
ret agent, Henry Kissinger. In this
situation, Kissinger openly return-
ed to Peking, to negotiate a time
and agenda for the talks..
i~t'T t!'+T t77.'C'A Tsivr ar .n_'

tinuing war, and the increasing air China and the President's u p
war, in Indochina; as well as from have replaced specials dealing with
Nixon's economic problems both the war and with domestic prob-
at home and overseas. For exam- lems. Even the Indochina War is
ple, the coverage of the President's frequently covered as a 4idelight
announcement of his trip to Pe- to Nixon's trip. For example, the
king virtually obliterated further anticipated Tet offensive is report-
news coverage of the P.R.G.'. ed not as an integral part of the
Seven Point Peace Plan. Indochina War but rather as an
To many people it seemed that effort by the Vietnamese to dis-1
whenever Nixon's critics got too rupt the President's trip to China.
loud in their criticisms about de- Similarly, Westmoreland now jus-1
valuation, unemployment, infla- tifies the intensified bombing 'of

to releasing American prisoners of
war, but because it will prevent
the Vietnamese from turning Nix-
on's trip into a flop. News cover,
age and analysis upon Nixon's
return will no doubt be so exten-
sive as to crowd news of the war'

party.
But the purpose of the trip is
not merely to get Nixon re-elected.
It will also have some affects on
American foreign policy and some
benefits for segments of American
society.
NIXON HAS already suggested

When Nixon told the world of his
trip in this nianner, the elected
and appointed officials in Wash-E
*ington-both supporters and oppo-
nedts of Nixon-found themselves ;
freed with a fait accompli; the:

proval in Washington prior to pre-
senting the plan to the Chinese.
Having silenced most of the
critics, of his trip, Nixon proceeded
with his plans to realize the trip.
Rather than take into his confi-

BUT1BTWEN Nxon gn-tion, racism, price controls ad in-
nouncement of the trip and Kis- finitum, the White House would
singer's return to Peking, the pur- roll out that old publicity magnet

alleged
trations
officers

Communist troop concen-
(which most American
in Vietnam deny the ex-

1
it
7
1
t
,:t
{

Japan: Facing a change

and economic problems off the that no major agreements will be
front pages. reached on this trip (this is part
of his argument that he should be
NIXON'S DESIRE to propel a re-elected to continue the dia-
worldwide image of "Nixon The logue).
Peacemaker" is amply revealed But what will the American peo-
in his style of handling the China m
tri. B deidng ot o tkeany, ple- gain from Nixon's trip to
trip. By deciding not to take nChina? Perhaps it will implement
other elected officials on his trip cultural and scientific exchanges
to China, but rather to take a large between the two countries. But
number of hand picked newsmen, unless China "changes color" (that
Nixon is working towards several is, decides to give up the quest
goals. First, he will be the only for a communist society) the trip
elected official who has had any will not in any way presage the
contact with Chinese officials. This,'elimination of the major contradic-
in conjunction with Kissinger's re- Ibons between American imperial-
cently announced intention to re- ism and the Peoples' Republic of
tire from his role of presidential China.
advisor, will strengthen Nixon's
claim for re-election as the only_ ____
man who has established a rapport
with the Chinese.
Nixon has also been using the
trip in another way to improve
moving away from his old position
of virulent anti-communism and
beginning high level negotiations A
with the Chinese, he has drawn
criticism from the extreme right
wing. L : rebutting this charge, WEDNESDAY
Nixon can pose as the rational
man in the middle between the Student Gallery-
paranoid right and the irrespon- f

For the Student Body:
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President of the United States was
Indochint
fContinued from Page 5)
the 1955-57 period (when Nixon
was Vice-President).
Although t h e ambassadorial
talks in "Warsaw were begun and
an agreeinent on the mutual re-
patriation of prisoners was nego-
tiated during that period. the gov-
ernment did not respond favorably
to additional Chinese initiatives
which were aimed at improving
Sino-American cultural, economic
and political relations.

dence government officials who (Continued from Pagt 5) tion, the most important of whichdistracted by his tourism in the
his China policy on its merits, is the balance of forces within Ja- People's Republic of China, we
and could not. But Sato, fortu- pan. At the least we can observe must keep our eyes on the Indo-
effects Tnately, is not Japan. He is not ev- that the post-occupation domi- chinese situation. But we should
whom they are confident will pre- en the whole of the ruling conser- nance of the conservative party, also recognize and attempt to con-
vail. vative party. His main political bolstered by American political solidate the trip's beneficial ef-
Thus the Chinese would have no support comes from the right wing support and a military alliance, fects. Central, of course, is the re-,
'reason to suggest to the Indochi- of the party, that segment which has not prevented a gradual mili- duced likelihood of Sino-American
nose that they settle the war on 'embodies the greatest personal and tary build-up. Have Nixon's trip hostilities. Other effects will come,
American terms for the sake of ideological continuities with pre- and other recent jolts to Japan- probably not in Indochina, but in
imnroving Sino-American rela- 1945 leadership. ese-American intimacy opened the America's client countries else-
tions. This is all in line with the If we widen the focus and con- floodgates of rearmament? On the where around the Pacific rim of
Chinese concet of a revolutionary sider the Japanese scene as a contrary, the rate of military ex-w Jt ic rim of
foreign policy: supporting the ef- whole. the impact of the Sino- pansion has recently been cut back Asia. Japan in particular will be
forts of peoples to liberate them- American dentente has been in-' (Asian Survey, Jan. 1972, p. 52). encouraged to peep out from un-
seves but not advocating the lib- vigorating. The tired policy of fol-E There are political as well as der American wings and try ad-
era tion of other peoples by Chi- lowing Washington's lead in all economic reasons for this. Nixon's just to the changes wrought in'
nes- efforts. things is undergoing its strongest trip and the Sino-American thaw East Asia by America's failure in

I

dents
rafts. Fair
V, FEB. 23rd
1st Floor, Union

IF THE CHINESE believe that Another likely topic of discus- postwar challenge. An internation-
the U.S. intervention in Indochina sion will be the role of Japan in al posture based more on Japan's
is doomed to defeat. then what will East Asia (see separate article). interests than on American cold-
be the results of this trip? Within war anxieties has a chance of em-
the last week the Chinese seem to' TN THE FINAL analysis. Nixon's erging. After all, on what grounds
have indicated a higher priority trio will have almost no effect on can Japan continue to be guided
for the Taiwan issue than for In- ' resolving the major conflicts be-. by cold-war dictates when Nixon
dochina. This position is in con- tween the U.S. and China. The is chatting amiably with Peking's
trast to that expressed less than Chinese are most interested in leaders? Parts of Japan's conserv-
a year ago when Indochina was Taiwan but Nixon has already rul- ative leadership have their own
felt by the Chinese to be the prob- ed out any major concessions on reasons for a strongly anti-Com-
lem of the highest priority. Thus this tonic. The Indochinese con- munist stance 'in East Asia, but
tht principal topic of discussion flict will not be settled in these their line has become much hard-
between Nixon and the Chinese talks. Even if he wanted to. Nixon er to justify.
will most likely be the removal of could not give the Chinese the A common liberal American ar-
U.. forces and support from'Tai- guarantees against. a resurgence of gument against any loosening of
wan. Nixon has already stated that Javanese militarism which they the Japanese-American tie has
he will not make any concessions seek. Therefore the only likely ef- been that Japanese. rearmament
to the Chinese in this regard. fects of this trip are the further would follow. George Ball raised
Tht Indochina War will most'normalization of Sino-American this spector in his recent critique
certainly also be discussed al- relations and an increase in con- of Nixon's trip (New York Times
though the Chinese may well tell tacts between the peoples of the Magazine, Feb. 13. 1972). There
m o countries. are many factors in this situa-
Nixon that the people for him to!
deal with are the Indochinese him
themselves. Thus the intensifica-
tion of the air war by the U.S. and
Nixon's recent hardening of the
'0., negotiating position wouldbe Enroll in U . of M
seen by the Chinese as issues
whhhuld prily be del New EuropeanSessions
with by the Indochinese peoples

not only remove the central ra- Indochina and China's new inter-
tionale for Japan's rearmament,
China's bellicose image. They also national eminence.

i
!,
I'
a
3i
t'
f

make it politically incumbent up-
on any Japanese government to
appear to be making solid steps
toward better Sino-Japanese re-
lations. Rapid military expansion
such as envisaged in Tokyo's
"fourth defense buildup plan,"
doesn't fit, as Chou En-lai has
been assiduously reminding the
Japanese public.
WHEN NIXON would have us
- -
*
*

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$1 .00 for those who set up their displays with-
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$2.00 for those who desire to use tables
The Gallery will be open at 11:30 AXM., Wednesday
for those participating in the Fair
For further info: Cail the UAC office-
763-11 07 or stop by the Art Gollery'
Registration Deadline-Tues., Feb.'22 at 4:30

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