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February 20, 1972 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

lunch
non-profit cooperative
conspiracy
coffeehouse-theater
330 Maynard Street
UM Film Society

Termpaper Arsenal, Inc.
Send $1.00 for your descriptive
catalog of 1,300 quality termpapers
519 Glenrock Ave., Suite 203
Los Angeles, Calif. 90024
I (213) 477-8474 477-5493
I "we need a local salesman"
i

!?

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

P

Liti~rigan

hault

page three

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Sunday, February 20, 1972

j DIAL 8-6416
S2 FUN FESTS
"The funniest movie I've seen this
year! Just go, run to see it!"
New York Post

.A' ,, AND "B ES
# 00
TODiSHOWN AT
1-5-9:05 d7 p.m.
Claude Chabro# s

LA FEMME INFIDELE

(1969)

A graceful and engrossing story of a suburban couple and
their disenchanted cottage in the woods near Versailles. The wife
is still young and beautiful. The husband watches dopey pro-
grams on the little television set that sits in the mouth of their
enormous, unused fireplace. Beauty and boredom don't mix for
long.
"Claude Chabrol demonstrates how to make a civilized
thriller. He serves up the sensuality and adultery with the
elegance of a master."-Paulirie Koel
NEXT WEEK: Fri. & Sat.: Bunvel's Tristona
Sun.: Conrad Rook's underground classic, Chappaqua
MATINEE
Ann Arbor
DANCE THEATRE
CONCERT

news briefs
by The Associated Press
PRESIDENT NIXON has ended the Congressional ban on aid
to Pakistan, stating that conditions in Pakistan are returning to
normal.
The President's action has led to mounting concern among Con-
gressmen that an early resumption of military aid to Pakistan is
planned.
In a vote last summer, Congress barred all aid, except humani-
tarian, from the country until the East Pakistani refugees be allowed
to return to their homeland from India.
THE NAVY HAS FORBIDDEN its officers to take government-
financed graduate courses at colleges that are terminating Navy
ROTC.
The order resulted from pressure applied by the House Armed
Services Committee, according to the Navy.
The committee reported that, "It is morally wrong for the mili-
tary to spend dollars sending students to a particular college or uni-
versity which has chosen not to cooperate with the military services."'
THE INDIAN GOVERNMENT has issued a blanket invita-
tion to Pakistan to enter into direct peace talks.
The proposal was contained in a letter sent to U.N. Secretary-
General Kurt Waldheim, released yesterday.
The letter stresses a preference for a bilateral conference thatt
would be arranged and conducted by the two nations, without any
third country assistance.
India's two-week war with Pakistan last December resulted in the
creation of the independent, Indian-supported state of Bangladesh.
* * *
ARGENTINA HAS BECOME THE FIFTH LATIN-AMERI-
CAN country to recognize the People's Republic of China, agree-
ing with Peking that mainland China is "the only legal govern-
ment of China."
Argentina favored the admission of Communist China to the-
United Nations but voted against the expulsion of Nationalist China.
E-last year.
East Quad Martha Cook
residents
WE'D LIKE TO MEET YOU!
TUES., FEB. 22 Room 20
7:00 p.m.EAST QUAD
BUSINESS STAFF

Viets dealt loss;
U. S. resumes air
raids over Laos

0

SAIGON ( - South Vietnamese forces suffered one of
their worst defeats in months yesterday in a battle at the out-
post in Ba Xuyen Province, about 110 miles south of Saigon.
The Communist attack opened up with mortars followed
by a ground attack against the outpost defended by several
hundred militiamen. Field reporots listed 27 soldiers and four
civilians killed.
The South Vietnamese command reported 38 Communist
attacks during a 24-hour period ending yesterday morning.
A series of battles in the Mekong Delta left 34 South Vietna-
mese dead and 87 wounded. Communist losses were not known.
In the central highlands, South Vietnamese rangers bat-
tled about 150 North Vietnamese troops three miles south of
Fire Base 5 near the border,--
In the air war, U.S. bombin~
raids shifted from South Viet-
nam to Laos, touching off "pro- oren i v
tective reaction" strikes over
neighboring North Vietnam for
the third successive day. Ir S orm
Six anti-aircraft artillery guns
were destroyed or damaged over
the North after they opened fire
across the border at U.S. planesn-
bombing the Ho Chi Minh trail,
the U.S. Command said, reporting
no damage to US. aircraft.

-Associated Press
Comimnunist Party convention
U.S. Communist Party president Bus Hall addresses the party's
convention yesterday as its nominee -for president in the 1972
election.

GUAM STOPOVER:

r

Nixon en route to
China; hotline likely

FEB. 18, 19-8:30

FEB. 20-2:30

Residential College Auditorium

ADULTS $2

STUDENTS $1

Tickets available at: Stangers, Jacobsons, and at
the door

HONOLULU (A') - President
Nixon and his party left Hono-
lulu last night for Guam, onenof
his last stops before reaching
mainland China.
After an overnight stay on
Guam, the Nixons will fly to
Shanghai to pick up a Chinese
navigator and go on to Peking
for the summit talks.
Press secretary Ronald Zieg-
ler emphasized yesterday that no
dramatic results should be ex-
pected from the President's
meetings with Chairman Mao
Tse-Tung and Premier Chou En-
Lai.
However, he quoted Nixon as
saying he wants to set up "an
ongoing communications belt"
between Washington and Pek-
UI
Saturday and Sunday
SATYAJIT RAY'S
THE MUSIC
ROOM
Dir. Satyajit Ray, 1965.
Indian, Bengal; subtitled.
Story of India's aristo-
cracy with music by Ravi
Shankar.

ing which has been isolated from
normalrcontact with Americans
for more than 20 years.
Ziegler neither confirmed nor
denied speculation that the Nix-
on visit might produce a capi-
tal-to-capital hotline similar to
that between Washington and
Moscow.
The United States, however, is
laying the groundwork for the
potential establishment of such
a link by granting RCA Corp. a
license to export to China a
permanent ground station that
would multiply China's commu-
nications with the rest of the
world.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day throughSunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier. $11 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tLion rates: $5 by carrier, $6 by mail.

Explaining the shift in air at-
tacks from Vietnam to Laos, one
military source said, "During the
dry season, the Ho Chi Minh trail
is the most lucrative target."
SThe 10 tactical air strikes in
South Vietnam during a 24-hour
period ending yesterday morning
was about the average number of
raids in the South for the four
months prior to Feb. 9.
After that date, the air strikes
reached an average of 150 a day.
The command said the increased
air strikes were designed to coun-
ter a Communist buildup along the
western borders of South Vietnam.
The Viet Cong radio reported
that five American pilots who were
shot down in raids over North Vi-
etnam this past week were pre-
sented at a news conference in
Hanoi yesterday.
The pilots were identified as Lt.
R a 1 p h Galati, Capt. William
Shwertfager, Capt. Kenneth Frase
or Fraser, Capt. James Cutter, and
Capt. Edwin Hawley. No home
towns or serial numbers were giv-
en.
The U.S. Command, although
acknowledging t h r e e fighter-
bombers were shot down over the
North last Wednesday and Thurs-
day, declined coment
However, the Pentagon confirm-
ed the five were missing.

Northern Ireland Protestants sign-
ed up yesterday in an armed mili-
tia pledged to fight any move to-
ward a united Ireland.
At one enrollment, Billy Hull,
veteran labor union chief and lea-
der of the Protestant hard-line
Ulster Vanguard movement an-=
nounced, "We will fight to stay
British, and when I say fight, I
mean exactly that."
British authorities view the Van-
guard movement as the beginning
of the long fore-told Protestant
backlash against the fight by the
outlawed Irish Republican Army to
bring Ulster under control of the
nainly Roman Catholic Irish Re-
public.
The movement adheres to the
principle of Protestant rule, veto-
ing British suggestions that the
province's domestic parliament be
reorganized to give the Roman
Catholic minority a guaranteed
place in government.
Meanwhile, across the province
violent incidents were reported. In
Londonderry, a British soldier shot
in the head by a sniper was re-
ported in critical condition.
In Belfast, terrorists planted a
dummy body packed with explo-
sives. When an army patrol went
to inspect the "body',, it exploded
and the troops came under fire.
One civilian was reported in-
jured.

$1-3 PREVIEWS TUES. & WED.

A/i . Il/ !r

La;I7

"A DELIGHTFUL COMEDY !"
(Geo. White-Head, Eugene O'Neill Foundation)

PLUS A SHORT:
SATYAJIT RAY
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7 and 9 p.m. 7

4 PERFORMANCES
Thurs.-Sun., Feb. 24-27

JI l

,! 1

N1: ISM

5c

i I

I

the ann arbor film cooperative

I

HELD OVER! Special additional engagement of KEN RUSSELL'S
WOMEN IN LOVE
with GLENDA JACKSON (Academy Award: Best Actress), OLIVER REED, ALAN BATES

I

MONDAY !-February 21st-2 SHOWINGS ONLY !

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