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February 15, 1972 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1972-02-15

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Tuesday, February 15, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

G T'

I

*

cagers
By GEORGE HASTINGS l lance of that form that made him
After half the Big Ten schedule such a devastating rebounder last
had passed, there iwere still quite year, and whether Michigan as a
A few doubts among sports fpllow- team was ever going to find its
ers about, the Michigan baskeetball shooting touch.
team, even though it was only a The answers came Saturday at
half game out of the conference Crisler Arena where the Wolver-
lead. ines ran Illinois off the court, 105-
The most discussed topics in- 83. Wilmore had an incredible
cluded whether Henry Wilmore game at guard, Brady dominated
was ever going to play a good game the backboards, and the whole
at guard, whether Ken Brady was team shot the eye out of the bas-
ever going to return to a semb- ket.
busted

fan

fire

in

Wilmore came up with his best
Big Ten effort of the year, pump-
ing in 31 points while playingy
he played a real guard rather than
an out - of - place forward, play- s
making and controlling the of-
fense. He and fellow guard Wayne
Grabiec put on a passing display NIGHT EDITOR:
as the Wolverines moved the ball'
as well as they have all year. FRANK LONGO
Brady's strong performance came
at an especially crucial time for verines have a team which will at
Michigan, the week after it had least make a run at the Big Ten
been completely dominated on the crown. To Orr, it was unquestion-
inside in a loss to Purdue. But the ably his team's finest hour. "We
Big Fella came up with his peak looked capable of beating any-
performance of the year, pulling one," he. crowed, "I'll tell you, we
down 17 rebounds, to lead the Wol- could win it."
verines in a big 55-42 rebound edge However, the Wolverines' two
over the Ilini. biggest rivals also had fine per-
The 6-9 center also got help formances on Saturday, as Ohio
from John Lockard, who contrib- State barely nosed out Purdue in
uted 13 boards as well as scoring a thriller 64-62, and Minnesota
22 from the inside. When Brady's blew Northwestern out of the gym;
14 points and Ernie Johnson's 11 784-55.-
are added in, the game represented The Ohio State-Purdue match
a sterling effort by the Michigan could have gone the other way.

leagu(
shot and cost them the game. "It
was the first time I ever forgot
my chalk," he muttered.
Actually, it was the outside
shooting of Ohio State which was
more decisive than the lack of
chalk. In the face of a tenacious
3-2 zone defense which prevented
the ball from getting inside too
often, the Buckeyes clamly sat
outside and took long shots, mak-
ing enough of them to stay with
the Boilermakers until the final
action. Alan Hornyak did the main
long range damage, scoring 18,
but Dan Gerhard and Mark Minor
also added 10 apiece
Meanwhile, Minnesota stayed
tied with Ohio State at 7-2 (Mich-
igan is third at 6-2) by coming up
Dear John?
Hey sports fans! Are you
sick and tired of what you read
in the Daily sports pages? Do
you have any wild ideas? Do
you want to see your name in
print? Do you like to write
obscene letters?..........
Well, write it down and send
it to Ffats Strops, c/o Sports
Editor, 420 Maynard, in the
city of trees.
Read FFATS ST R O P S
MAILBAG, beginning n e x t
week on the sports page.

race)

FACE BROWNS:

Suspensions.
... what a waste
al shackelford
L LMOST A MONTH ago Michigan coach Johnny Orr kicked
sophomore guards Terry Tyler and John Bridges off the
basketbafl team. He later confided to a group of sportswriters
that, had rnam Brady and Mike Weaver been academically elig-
ible, they would have been included in the purge.
The suspensions surprised the rest of the team, who hadn't
been included in Orr's lofty decision-making process, but have
now become a pretty dead issue in light of Michigan's im-
proving play. Whether the Wolverines need the four banned
sophomores on the court or not, it is still the plain truth that
they've gotten a raw deal in a number of ways.
First of all, all four have at various times during the
year acquired the "bum" tag, something that happens to a
lot of black athletes who get into academic or social diffi-
eulty (social difficulty can be loosely defined as speaking
out).
Orr subconsciously maligned Tyler following the North-
western game when he mentioned to writers that Terry had, as
a freshman, been suspended for a couple games by frosh coch
Dick Honig: The implication of this comment is that Tyler is
suffering from long-term attitudinal problems and Orr isn't the
only one who's had trouble handling him.
Ditto with Brady, Bridges and Weaver: I've had the feeling
ever since basketball practice opened last fall that these four
sophomores have been lumped together as the team's prob-
lem children. Often one or two of the four were absent from
prctice, and Michigan's coaching staff (Orr and assistant
coach Fred Snowden) offered various explanations. One was
in the infirmary, another had a sick' father, another was
having grade trouble . . . an infinitum. Orr once offered that
sophomores often have problems, thus bolstering the "sopho-
more slump" theory which has floated around college campuses
for years.
But the bad publicity which has hovered over the four
sophs is more a matter of what hasn't been said. Many people
look at the absence of one or all of the sophs from action and.
infer -that Orr has been beset with troublemakers.
But the banned sophomores have legitimate grievances,
mostly centering around Orr's unwillingness to use' them
when Michigan was in the throes of a barely .500 season,
and some experimentation seemed called for. They won-
dered aloud why they weren't getting a chance on the floor
and their questions weren't adequately answered by the
goschft staff.
Whether the sophs should have been playing or not is not
particularly relevant, since it is a question which calls for a
purely subjective opinion. But it does seem reasonable that
players like Tyler and Brady, who were recruited after highly-
successful schoolboy careers, get a chance to show their stuff
and even, in Tyler's case, to start. Especially back in 1971 when
the Michigan backcourt was about as productive as a spayed
hound-dog.
Unhappy with the lack of playing time, one of the sopho-
mores would occasionally show up late for practice, or cut it en-
tirely, or maybe play healf-heartedly when he did come. A
cotple of the suspended sophs even recall that the coaches
were concerned with their failure to smile in practice.
Orr explains why it was necessary for him to suspend the
sophomores as follows: "Our team was getting in the same
attitude problem as those guys Were. That kind' of attitude
is infectious. We waited as long as we could wait." Orr has
commented many times that the decision was an agonizing one,
and considering what a nice guy Johnny Orr is, I'm sure this
is true.
The manner in which Orr booted off the sophs is up
for question. One of them maintains that he wouldn't
be so riled up over his suspension if Orr had told him,
"Either improve your attitude or I'll kick you off the team."
At least Orr should have talked the matter over with the
rest of the team; if this had been done, perhaps the sus-
pensions could have been avoided.
Who knows if any of the four sophs will play at Michigan
again? Brady r and Weaver are now academically ineligible.
Tyler and Bridges are trying to work something out with Orr,
and may be back in Wolverine uniform any day now. Regard-
less of who returns, the suspensions were handled with a very
W heavy hand, and some good basketball players have every right
to be unhappy about it.

with an excellent effort against
Northwestern, in their finest of-
fensive showing of the year in the
Big Ten. The Gophers, who have
relied mainly on defense in their
title bid, got 25 points from Clyde
Turner to lead the rout.
In other action, two teams which
started out poorly in the confer-
ence climbed towards respecta-
bilitywith winsdSaturday. Michi-
gan State evened its record at 4-4
by downing Iowa 100-91, while In-
diana 'won its third straight after
four losses by stopping Wisconsin
in overtime, 84-76.
The Spartans at one point blew
a 21 - point lead, allowing the
Hawkeyes to rip off 16 straight
points in the process, but came
back on the strength of Mike Rob-
inson's 38 points to take the win.
Michigan State was aided when
Iowa's two top scorers, Rick Wil-
liams and Kevin Kunnert, both
fouled out in the final minute.
The script for the Indiana win
was similar as the Hoosiers also
squandered a big lead, this one of
13 points, and were forced into
overtime before they finally tri-
umphed by hitting on eight of ten
foul shots in the extra period. In-
diana's big front line of John Rit-
ter, Steve Downing, and Joby
Wright was the difference, scoring
17, 16, and 13 points, respectively.

front line.
Shooting-wise, it was also Mich-
igan's best day of the Big Ten
season. The Wolverines shot at a
sizzling 61 per cent clip in the first
half, then went on to shoot 55
per cent for the game. Leading the
way here was Wilmore, who made
14 of 23.
For Johnny Orr, Michigan's be-'
leagered coach, the game was a
welcome tonic, as it finally con-
vinced .everybody that the Wol-
t :Sg". .. ;.jtorf"w }"..rr.; r+1r ";" "r,. .

but for a pair of rebounds in the
final minute which went to Luke
Witte of the Buckeyes instead of
Purdue's Bill Franklin.
'With 57 seconds to go, OSU's
Mark Minor missed a .foul shot
with the score tied at 62-62, but
the 7 - foot Witte outjumped
Franklin for the rebound and put
the ball back in to give the Bucks
a two-point margin.
Then, with less than ten sec-
onds to go, Purdue's Frank Kend-
rick missed a jumpshot, and.
Franklin fouled Witte in an at-
tempt to take the rebound away
from him, thus sealing the Boiler-
tmakers' fate.
9 Purdue's coach George King ad-
mitted that "Witte's rebounding
at the end killed us," but he blam-
ed the loss on a missing piece of
chalk. King said that the absence
of a piece of chalk with which to
diagram a play for Purdue's final.
shot resulted in a poor-percentage

Stadium hosts
Lions again
Professional football returns to chance to see two NFL teams in
the 101,000- seat University of person," added Thomas. "It drew,
Michigan Stadium at Ann Arbor from all over the state, especially
on Sunday afternoon, August 20. from the w e s t e r n areas. The
That is when the Detroit Lions Browns have many followers in
meet the Cleveland Browns, de- southern Michigan and northern
fending champions of the Central Olio. This ganme will provide those
Division in the American Football fans an opportunity to see them
Conference,. who will be making play the Lions in a renewal of a
their first appearance in Michigan long rivalry."

since 1967 and their only one in
1972.
Announcement was made today
by Don Canham, U-M athletic di-
rector, and Russ Thomas, Lion
general manager, following agree-
ment of contract terms with Pres-
ident Art Modell of the Browns.
"The initial NFL game played
at Ann Arbor last year was a fan-
tastic success from all angles,"
said Canham. "We feel the game
this year will be another great
one."
The Lions defeated the Balti-
more Colts, 23-20, last August in
the first pro football game ever
played at U-M, with a touchdown
in the final 18 seconds before 91,-.
745 fans in an upset of the de-
fending Super Bowl champions.
"The game last year gave thou-
sands of out-state fans their first
I SC ORES
COLLEGE SCORES
Marquette 90, Butler 76
Virginia Tech 76, Tulane 55
Notre Dame 92, Bowling Green 65
Vanderbilt 90, Florida 74
Kentucky 63, Miss St. 55
Navy 70, Georgetown 66
Oral Roberts 103, Trinity 82
NBA SCORE
Houston 130, Philadelphia 116

#Professional League Standings

Cleveland, led by their great
running back Leroy Kelly, fash
ioned a 9-5 record last season to
win their divisional title for the
third time in four years before
losing to Baltimore in the chami.
pionship playoffs. Detroit wound
up with a 7-6-1 second place fin-
ish in the NFC Central Division.

M handball
takes second
Steve Smith swept past defend-.
ing intercollegiate ,national .handA
ball champion Wes Yee 21-17 end
21-16 to capture first in the Mid-
west Intercollegiate Divisional
class A singles and lead Michigan
to a second place finish behind.
Lake Forest College (Ill.).
The Foresters, defending na-
tional champs in ,intercollegiate
play, grabbed 16 points to take
the team trophy. Michigan fol-
lowed with 10, nine of them on,
Smith's strong performance. Da-
vid Lieberman added a point in
class B singles, while the doubles
team of Jim Best and Joe Walsh
clicked for the consolation trophy
after falling in their first round
match in regular play.

"i .ti
Big T
Ohio State
Minnesota
MICHIGAN
Mich. State
Purdue
Indiana
Illinois
Wisconsin
Iowa
Northwestern

en Standings .
Conference'All-Games

W L Pct
7 2 .718
7 2 .778
6 2 .750
4 4 .500
3 3 .500
3 4 .429
2 4 .333
2 4 .333
2 6 .250
2 7 .222

w
14
13
11
9
11
11
9
8:
4:

L
4
5
7
7
6
5
7
10
13

NHL
East Division
WL T Pts
Boston 39 9 87
New York 35 11 9 79
Montreal 31 13 11 73
Detroit 24 23 9 57
Toronto 23 24 11 57
Buffalo 11 32 14 36
Vancouver 15 34 5 35
West Division
Chicago 37 13 6 80
Minnesota 30 18 9 69
California 18 23 11 47
St. Louis 19 30 8 46
Philadelphia 17 28 10 44
Pittsburgh 16 31 9 41
Los Angeles 15 47 7 47.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games.
New York at Vancouver
California at Boston
Chicago at St. Louis
onlyagames scheduled
NBA

GF
228
238
211
181
182
151
136
187
153
155
156
135
139
.145

GA
123
127
147
176
179
214
192
113
128
260
188
144
185
228
GB
5
19
25
3
(6
9
12
27
14%
15
28
37%

Monday's Game
Houston at Philadelphia
Only game scheduled
Tuesday's Games
Houston at Baltimore
Atlanta at Detroit
Cincinnati at Los Angeles
Boston at Portland
Only games scheduled
ABA
East Division
W L Pct
Kentucky 46 12 .793
Virginia 37 24 .607
New York 28 32 .467
Floridians 23 36 .390
Carolina 23 37 .383
Pittsburgh 21 37 .362
West Division
,Utah 40 20 .667
Indiana 35 25 .583
Dallas 29 34 .460
Denver 24 36 .400
Memphis 23 36 .390
Monday's Games
Floridians at Utah
Oily game scheduled

GB
102
19
231
24
25
5
122
15%
16

Former Judge who resigned from the
bench because of FLAGRANT UN-

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct
Boston 43 19 .654
New York 37 23 .617
Philadelphia 23 37 .383
Buffalo 17 43 .283
Central Division
Baltimore 24 .34 .414
Atlanta 22 38 .367
Cincinnati 18 41 .305
Cleveland 17 45 .274
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
Milwaukee 50 13 .794
Chicago 44 18 .710
Phoenix 38 25 .603
Detroit 22 39 .361
Pacific Division
Los Angeles 50 8 .S0
Golden State 37 24 .607
Seattle 37 25 .597
Houston ' 23 37 .353
Portland 15 48 .238

TV & Stereo Rentals
$10.00 per month
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FREE DELIVERY, PICK UP
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CALL:
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FAIRNESS AND INJUSTICES
THE COURT SYSTEM

OF

<" ". ,

WEDNESDAY-4:15 p.m.
Lawyer's Club Lounge

i i

U~ 16I

1I

-Daily-Terry McCarthy
OF COURSE dunking's illegal, but you could have fooled someone
with this picture which seems to have caught our own John Lockard
in the aftermath of a satisfying stuff. Watching the proceedings
with interest are Michigan's 6-8 forward Ernie Johnson and four
somewhat immobile Illinois defenders.

Free Instructions
Pocket Billiards
THURSDAY
7-9 P.M.
Michigan Union

Man Adapting to the Small Planet
SEMINAR SERIES
DR. JOHN TODD
Director of the New Alchemy Institute
DESIGN OF ENVIRONMENTALLY
ADAPTING COMMUNITIES
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 16, 7:30 P.M.
UGLI MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
sponsored by ECOLOGY CENTER & COMMUNITY ORGANIC GARDEN

I

LUNCH-RAP-JAZZ SESSION

TUESDAY, Feb. 15
U.M. International Center

12:00 Noon

"-

with
MODUPEOLA AFOLABI "ART" ALADE, Visiting Nigerian ;T.V.
Producer and Leader of Dixieland Jazz Ensemble
"THE JAZZ PREACHERS" Cost: 50c
Reservations must be made, call 662-5529. Seating capacity
limited, so please call to be sure of lunch and seating.
Sponsored by Ecumenical Campus Center & the International Center

I

I

I

Graduate School and
UN EMPLOYMENT

i

-1

The Rackham School of Graduate Studies and the Rackham
Student Government are co-sponsoring a Symposium on Graduate
and Professional Education and. Manpower Policies to be held
May 24-25 in the Rackham Building.
A COMMITTEE IS NOW BEING FORMED TO DO THE PLANNING FOR
THE SYMPOSIUM WHICH WILL COVER SUCH QUESTIONS AS:
" What inequities'inefficiences exist in current Federal
programs for support of graduate and professional training?
i Where should American universities make cutbacks in their
graduate,/professional programs?
. How can training programs be reformed to prepare students for
n w.mr-znrtri m fin.,4 'kz

s
f

So Good It's

I

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